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Ninth Street Park Selland Development Housing Programs Overview of process and considerations for development For more information, log on to www.cityofwenatchee.com.

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Presentation on theme: "Ninth Street Park Selland Development Housing Programs Overview of process and considerations for development For more information, log on to www.cityofwenatchee.com."— Presentation transcript:

1 Ninth Street Park Selland Development Housing Programs Overview of process and considerations for development For more information, log on to or download this presentation at ftp://ftp.cityofwenatchee.com/Planning/

2 Agenda for Meeting City staff presentation City staff presentation Neighborhood resident spokesperson (Fred Munson) Neighborhood resident spokesperson (Fred Munson) Ninth Street Park representative (Patrick Pleas) Ninth Street Park representative (Patrick Pleas) Audience will be provided note cards if you have questions to ask of the city Audience will be provided note cards if you have questions to ask of the city PowerPoint presentation can be downloaded at the city’s ftp web site: ftp://ftp.cityofwenatchee.com/Planning/ PowerPoint presentation can be downloaded at the city’s ftp web site: ftp://ftp.cityofwenatchee.com/Planning/ ftp://ftp.cityofwenatchee.com/Planning/

3 Purpose of Meeting To inform and educate, but not to testify or comment To inform and educate, but not to testify or comment To outline the process for annexation and other considerations To outline the process for annexation and other considerations To outline the process for consideration of development projects To outline the process for consideration of development projects To outline the city’s housing needs and programs To outline the city’s housing needs and programs To answer general questions about the process To answer general questions about the process

4 What this meeting is not An opportunity for input on applications (none have been submitted yet) An opportunity for input on applications (none have been submitted yet) Public hearings will be held for input, along with an opportunity to submit written comments at such time as a complete application is submitted to the city Public hearings will be held for input, along with an opportunity to submit written comments at such time as a complete application is submitted to the city

5 Annexation Proposals 1. The city has received an application to annex from Brad Selland for the former Diede orchard property 2. The city anticipates an application to annex from Kamkon development 3. The city will seek to annex the Chrisand Lane area in fulfillment of a sewer annexation agreement entered into by the developers in 2003

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9 Annexation Why Annexation? Why Annexation? Proper annexation of areas adjacent to cities is often crucial to establishing and maintaining urban order and effective government Proper annexation of areas adjacent to cities is often crucial to establishing and maintaining urban order and effective government Facilitates the full utilization of existing municipal resources, such as fire, police, streets, water and sewer Facilitates the full utilization of existing municipal resources, such as fire, police, streets, water and sewer

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11 Annexation Agreements City agreed in 2003 to extend sewer to Pierce and Nelson to facilitate the subdivision of land (Chrisand Lane, etc.) City agreed in 2003 to extend sewer to Pierce and Nelson to facilitate the subdivision of land (Chrisand Lane, etc.) The agreement specifies that the applicant, successors or assigns agree to immediately annex to the city when feasible The agreement specifies that the applicant, successors or assigns agree to immediately annex to the city when feasible If the owners do not agree to annex, the agreement assigns the Power of Attorney to the Wenatchee City Clerk to sign the annexation petition on their behalf If the owners do not agree to annex, the agreement assigns the Power of Attorney to the Wenatchee City Clerk to sign the annexation petition on their behalf

12 Annexation Process Annexation process starts with a petition from property owners representing 10% of the assessed value of the area to be annexed Annexation process starts with a petition from property owners representing 10% of the assessed value of the area to be annexed City council considers petition, sets the boundary by adding or deleting area, and authorizes petitioner to proceed. City council considers petition, sets the boundary by adding or deleting area, and authorizes petitioner to proceed.

13 Annexation Process, con’t. The 2 nd step is a petition from property owners representing 60% of the assessed value; the City Council then sets the date for a public hearing to consider the annexation The 2 nd step is a petition from property owners representing 60% of the assessed value; the City Council then sets the date for a public hearing to consider the annexation The final step is a public hearing on the annexation request. Notice is given by posting the property in 3 locations and providing notice in the paper. Direct notice to property owners or adjacent property is not provided. The final step is a public hearing on the annexation request. Notice is given by posting the property in 3 locations and providing notice in the paper. Direct notice to property owners or adjacent property is not provided. The city has rarely, if ever, denied an annexation request provided that the request makes a logical boundary for the city The city has rarely, if ever, denied an annexation request provided that the request makes a logical boundary for the city

14 Planned Developments The city has not received an application from Kamkon to either annex or develop the property The city has not received an application from Kamkon to either annex or develop the property If an application is submitted, the city anticipates that the application will be for a Planned Development to allow for flexibility and increased density (more homes than traditional subdivision) If an application is submitted, the city anticipates that the application will be for a Planned Development to allow for flexibility and increased density (more homes than traditional subdivision)

15 Purpose of Planned Development Implement goals and policies of Comprehensive Plan Implement goals and policies of Comprehensive Plan Protect and enhance environmental features Protect and enhance environmental features Encourage development of affordable and diverse housing Encourage development of affordable and diverse housing Provide other public benefits Provide other public benefits

16 Planned Development applications reviewed for: Compliance with goals and policies of Comprehensive Plan Compliance with goals and policies of Comprehensive Plan Compliance with the purpose of the Zoning Ordinance Compliance with the purpose of the Zoning Ordinance The development will achieve a public benefit The development will achieve a public benefit The proposal’s harmony with the surrounding area The proposal’s harmony with the surrounding area The proposal is superior to or more innovative than conventional development The proposal is superior to or more innovative than conventional development The proposal provides greater public benefit than required by adopted zoning standards The proposal provides greater public benefit than required by adopted zoning standards Compatible visual effect as seen from neighboring properties Compatible visual effect as seen from neighboring properties

17 Planned Developments shall meet: Lot coverage of the underlying zone Lot coverage of the underlying zone Off street parking requirements Off street parking requirements Permitted uses (residential) Permitted uses (residential) Exterior boundary setbacks Exterior boundary setbacks Landscaping and screening Landscaping and screening Opportunity for 50% density increase based on attributes of the proposal Opportunity for 50% density increase based on attributes of the proposal Complete public improvements (streets, sidewalks, etc) Complete public improvements (streets, sidewalks, etc)

18 Planned Development Review Process State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Environmental checklist identifying impacts Environmental checklist identifying impacts Determination of impact and any mitigation made by city Determination of impact and any mitigation made by city Notice of application provided: Notice of application provided: Written notice to property owners within 300 feet Written notice to property owners within 300 feet Signs posted on property Signs posted on property

19 Planned Development Review Process, con’t. Planning Commission Public Hearing Planning Commission Public Hearing Citizen body holds public hearing, considering the application against the city code Citizen body holds public hearing, considering the application against the city code All people afforded opportunity to present written or oral testimony All people afforded opportunity to present written or oral testimony Planning Commission makes recommendation to City Council Planning Commission makes recommendation to City Council City Council Decision City Council Decision Consideration of the record before the Planning Commission Consideration of the record before the Planning Commission Usually not a public hearing, unless appealed (and then a “closed-record” appeal) Usually not a public hearing, unless appealed (and then a “closed-record” appeal) Decision of Council final, subject to appeal to court Decision of Council final, subject to appeal to court

20 Cluster Subdivisions The city has not received an application from Selland to develop the property (waiting for annexation) The city has not received an application from Selland to develop the property (waiting for annexation) If an application is submitted, the city anticipates that the application will be for a Cluster Subdivision to allow for flexibility due to topography of the site If an application is submitted, the city anticipates that the application will be for a Cluster Subdivision to allow for flexibility due to topography of the site

21 Cluster Development Standards: Minimum subdivision size – 5 acres Minimum subdivision size – 5 acres Meet the overall density requirement of the underlying zone Meet the overall density requirement of the underlying zone Individual lot area may be reduced 25% Individual lot area may be reduced 25% Lot depth & width may be reduced 20% Lot depth & width may be reduced 20% All other zoning standards apply All other zoning standards apply All reductions compensated for with equivalent open space All reductions compensated for with equivalent open space Open space shall be; Open space shall be; Scenic Scenic Recreation Recreation Conservation Conservation Accessible without trespassing Accessible without trespassing Unimproved Unimproved Held in permanent reserve Held in permanent reserve

22 City Circulation Plan Land south of Crawford Street was added to the Urban Growth Area (UGA) in 1999 Land south of Crawford Street was added to the Urban Growth Area (UGA) in 1999 Further expansion of the UGA is contemplated in new draft plan (further up Squilchuck) Further expansion of the UGA is contemplated in new draft plan (further up Squilchuck) As part of the designation of the UGA, the city adopted a circulation plan. This plan added new road connections As part of the designation of the UGA, the city adopted a circulation plan. This plan added new road connections

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24 City Housing Needs City completed a Consolidated Plan for Housing and Community Development in 2005 as required by HUD for federal funds City completed a Consolidated Plan for Housing and Community Development in 2005 as required by HUD for federal funds Chelan and Douglas Counties completed a Ten- Year Plan to Reduce Homelessness in the region in 2005 as required by Washington State Chelan and Douglas Counties completed a Ten- Year Plan to Reduce Homelessness in the region in 2005 as required by Washington State Funding is provided from both the federal and state government for housing needs Funding is provided from both the federal and state government for housing needs

25 Household Income 15% of the total population in Wenatchee was living in poverty in 1999, compared to 11% in the state as a whole 15% of the total population in Wenatchee was living in poverty in 1999, compared to 11% in the state as a whole Between 2000 and 2004, the state’s median income increased by 7%, while Chelan County’s median household income grew by only 1.5%, from $39,172 in 2000 to $39,737 in 2004 Between 2000 and 2004, the state’s median income increased by 7%, while Chelan County’s median household income grew by only 1.5%, from $39,172 in 2000 to $39,737 in 2004 In 1999 the city’s Hispanic population earned a median income that was 25% less than the overall population ($26,127 compared to $34,897) In 1999 the city’s Hispanic population earned a median income that was 25% less than the overall population ($26,127 compared to $34,897) The incidence of poverty among Wenatchee families with children headed by females is much greater than in the state and the U.S.: 44% of the City’s female head of households with children under 18, and 54% of those households with children under the age of five, were living in poverty The incidence of poverty among Wenatchee families with children headed by females is much greater than in the state and the U.S.: 44% of the City’s female head of households with children under 18, and 54% of those households with children under the age of five, were living in poverty

26 Housing Trends & Conditions At 58%, home ownership in Wenatchee remained significantly below the countywide rate of 65%. 61% of white householders lived in housing they owned or were buying, while 35% of non-white householders lived in housing they owned or were buying At 58%, home ownership in Wenatchee remained significantly below the countywide rate of 65%. 61% of white householders lived in housing they owned or were buying, while 35% of non-white householders lived in housing they owned or were buying Almost half (44%) of renter households in Wenatchee paid more than 30% of their income for rent in both 1990 and In 2000, 19%, or 885 renter households, paid more than 50% of their income for rent Almost half (44%) of renter households in Wenatchee paid more than 30% of their income for rent in both 1990 and In 2000, 19%, or 885 renter households, paid more than 50% of their income for rent

27 Consolidated Plan Goals and Objectives Goal 1: Provide decent affordable housing Goal 1: Provide decent affordable housing Increase the supply of affordable housing available to the community’s lowest-income households Increase the supply of affordable housing available to the community’s lowest-income households Improve the quality of rental housing available to the community’s lowest-income households and individuals Improve the quality of rental housing available to the community’s lowest-income households and individuals Expand homeownership opportunities Expand homeownership opportunities

28 Consolidated Plan Goals and Objectives, con’t. Goal 2: Improve the quality of life throughout the community Goal 2: Improve the quality of life throughout the community Revitalize neighborhoods Revitalize neighborhoods Provide support for integrated high priority public services and community facilities Provide support for integrated high priority public services and community facilities

29 Consolidated Plan Goals and Objectives, con’t. Goal 3: Increase individual and community self- sufficiency Goal 3: Increase individual and community self- sufficiency Increase the number of living wage jobs available within the community Increase the number of living wage jobs available within the community Provide lower-income persons with assistance in obtaining the education and skills needed to compete for living wage jobs Provide lower-income persons with assistance in obtaining the education and skills needed to compete for living wage jobs

30 Ten-year Plan to Reduce Homelessness The goal of the Ten-year Homeless Housing Plan is to reduce homelessness by 50 percent in Chelan and Douglas Counties The goal of the Ten-year Homeless Housing Plan is to reduce homelessness by 50 percent in Chelan and Douglas Counties Priorities: Priorities: Reduce the number of Homeless Families Reduce the number of Homeless Families Reduce the number of Homeless Youth Reduce the number of Homeless Youth Reduce the number of Chronically Homeless Individuals Reduce the number of Chronically Homeless Individuals Reduce the number of Non-chronically Homeless Individuals Reduce the number of Non-chronically Homeless Individuals Reduce the number of Homeless Farm workers Reduce the number of Homeless Farm workers

31 Homelessness Strategies Housing Strategy Housing Strategy Services Strategy Services Strategy Prevention Strategy Prevention Strategy Income Strategy Income Strategy Health Strategy Health Strategy

32 Short-term activities Pursue options for evicted mobile home park residents Pursue options for evicted mobile home park residents Other activities: Other activities: homeless outreach homeless outreach mental health and substance abuse mental health and substance abuse homeownership opportunities homeownership opportunities Privacy Law Exemptions Privacy Law Exemptions Homeless Youth Homeless Youth SSI and Medicaid benefits following jail release SSI and Medicaid benefits following jail release

33 Long-term activities: Create 35 "floating" additional units of transition-in-place housing Create 35 "floating" additional units of transition-in-place housing Develop a strategic plan for Mobile Home Park closures Develop a strategic plan for Mobile Home Park closures Use flexible funds to provide short-term rental assistance Use flexible funds to provide short-term rental assistance Identify or build a 16 unit permanent supportive housing project Identify or build a 16 unit permanent supportive housing project Create a "Drug Court" for parents with drug and alcohol convictions and create a jail discharge plan Create a "Drug Court" for parents with drug and alcohol convictions and create a jail discharge plan Increase the number of rental assistance vouchers Increase the number of rental assistance vouchers Add incentives to local planning regulations to encourage development of affordable housing Add incentives to local planning regulations to encourage development of affordable housing Provide density bonuses via zoning law to encourage development of affordable housing Provide density bonuses via zoning law to encourage development of affordable housing Negotiate with providers on their policies to identify and enroll eligible individuals in applicable programs without deterring the person from participation due to restrictive rules and requirements Negotiate with providers on their policies to identify and enroll eligible individuals in applicable programs without deterring the person from participation due to restrictive rules and requirements

34 Ninth Street Park Assessment February 2005 park survey results: February 2005 park survey results: 75 mobile homes – 82% owned or being purchased 75 mobile homes – 82% owned or being purchased 5 travel trailers, 54 singles, 5 doubles, 3 homes 5 travel trailers, 54 singles, 5 doubles, 3 homes 61% agricultural workers 61% agricultural workers 68% preferred to move unit to another park, 5% sell and move to rental, 14% sell and purchase new mobile or home, 13% other 68% preferred to move unit to another park, 5% sell and move to rental, 14% sell and purchase new mobile or home, 13% other 3.28 avg. household size – 94% below low income (78% below very low income) 3.28 avg. household size – 94% below low income (78% below very low income)

35 Relocation Challenges Limited vacancies (20 vacancies noted in survey) Limited vacancies (20 vacancies noted in survey) Many existing homes might not be able to move Many existing homes might not be able to move City does not allow single wides except in approved parks City does not allow single wides except in approved parks Limited options in either Douglas or Chelan counties Limited options in either Douglas or Chelan counties Incomes of residents do not provide many options for traditional housing Incomes of residents do not provide many options for traditional housing

36 City Housing Funds The city administers 3 housing funds that can help residents: The city administers 3 housing funds that can help residents: Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Recording surcharge fees (2 programs): Recording surcharge fees (2 programs): Low-income Low-income Homeless Homeless Applications due August 15 th Applications due August 15 th Go to Go to FundAmount CDBG $ 165,000 Low-income (2060) $ 150,000 Homeless $ 200,000 TOTAL $ 515,000

37 Questions? Please fill out a note card and hand to a staff person Please fill out a note card and hand to a staff person We will work to address it either at this meeting or in writing We will work to address it either at this meeting or in writing Include an or address to send response Include an or address to send response We will handle questions after comments from the neighborhood and park representatives We will handle questions after comments from the neighborhood and park representatives Thank you for your attention!


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