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Presentation on theme: "Photo by rishibando - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License with Haiku Deck."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Photo by rishibando - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License with Haiku Deck

3 Photo by spike Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License with Haiku Deck

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6 Photo by LukePDQ - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License with Haiku Deck

7 The Big Picture

8 P ostsecondary & W orkforce R eady Learning & Behavior Skills Content Knowledge Social Studies & Social Sciences Social, cultural, historical concepts Interpret sources, evaluate evidence, build conceptual frameworks Civic responsibility & political process Interpret from a global perspective Arts & Humanities Shaping of culture Instruments of social & political thought Awareness of innovators Science Scientific method Draw conclusions Core concepts of disciplines Scientific concepts can be challenged Literacy Read with understanding & write coherently Employ English properly & fluently Use logic & rhetoric Access primary & secondary sources Find and Use Information & IT Creativity & Innovation Collaboration Critical Thinking & Problem Solving Civic Responsibility Communication Personal Responsibility Global & Cultural Awareness Work Ethic Mathematical Sciences Be quantitatively literate Algebraic & geometric principles Problem solving Data & statistics Colorado’s interpretation of 21 st Century Skills!

9 Readiness vs. Preparedness National Assessment Governing Board defines preparedness as a subset of readiness “Preparedness focuses on academic qualifications, which are measured by NAEP. Readiness includes behavioral aspects of student performance - time management, persistence, and interpersonal skills, for example, which are not measured by NAEP.” (Technical Panel on 12th Grade Preparedness Research Final Report, 2009)

10 Career and College Readiness – ACT, 2008 The level of achievement a student needs to be ready to enroll and succeed—without remediation—in credit‐bearing first‐year postsecondary courses. And by postsecondary we mean primarily two‐year or four-year institutions, trade schools, and technical schools. Today, however, workplace readiness demands the same level of knowledge and skills as college readiness.

11 Not every student needs exactly the same knowledge and skills to be college and career ready.

12 Colorado's Postsecondary Workforce Readiness Definition: "The knowledge, skills, and behaviors essential to high school graduates to be prepared to enter college and the workforce and compete in the global economy including content knowledge, learning and behavior skills.“ See more at:

13 Key Cognitive Strategies

14 The Four Keys & Measurements

15 Student Ownership of Learning Model Motivation and Engagement Goal Orientation & Self Direction Self-efficacy and Self-confidence Metacognition and Self- monitoring Persistence, Resilience, Tenacity and Grit

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17 Policy Framework

18 Photo by Matt Nazario-Miller - Creative Commons Attribution License with Haiku Deck Video

19 Awareness & Dissemination Developing readiness, creating awareness, conducting training and planning Implementation Making meaning of the ICAP, engaging in activities and process Implementation Continued – embedded into new legislation ICAP Reboot: rethinking the entire process, partnerships, cross-collaboration, systems Refinement 2013 – 2014 ICAPs integral part of school/district culture, revising milestones and indicators Reset 2014 – 2015 ICAPs part of new legislation and grad. guidelines. ICAP workgroup ICAP Journey

20 CDE Grad Guidelines Work Groups Capstone November 2013 ICAP November st Century Skills December 2013 Industry Certificate February 2014 Special Populations February 2014 Assessment May 2014 Endorsed Diploma May 2014

21 Source: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability

22 A document consisting of a student’s (a) course taking and post-secondary plans aligned to career goals and (b) documentation of the range of college and career readiness skills developed. A process that relies on a student’s understanding of the relevance of school courses as well as out-of‐school learning opportunities and provides the student access to career development opportunities that incorporate self-exploration, career exploration, and career planning and management activities. A Quality ILP is…. Source: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability

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27 How do we use ICAP for student engagement and successful transition in Middle School NOW?

28 Why is the transition to ninth grade challenging to students? Academic challenges More rigorous classes, frequent homework assignments Credits count towards graduation More inexperienced teachers compared to other grades Social challenges Larger school, fewer personal connections Stresses of making friends, fitting in Desire for greater independence, less likely to seek out adults 27

29 Why a focus on transition to ninth grade? Compared to other high school grades, ninth grade students nationally have Lowest grade point average Most missed classes Most failing grades Most misbehavior referrals Highest enrollment because 22% are repeating the grade Success in ninth grade is critical to on-time graduation from high school. 28

30 How can schools support transitioning ninth graders? Coordination between middle school and high school Thoughtful and Intentional Course Selection Processes Contagious movement: 8 th grade Career Fairs! Ninth grade orientation, summer academy Ongoing support during ninth grade 29

31 Transition Planning Tool

32 School Counseling Pyramid Individualized Interventions Closing the Gap Small Group Core Curriculum School School Improvement

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37 Individual Exploration I Am Who I Am … And As Others See Me Barriers: What They Are and What to Do about Them Goal Setting Begins with a Dream

38 Photo by C Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License with Haiku Deck

39 INDUSTRY CLUSTER PATHWAYS PLAN OF STUDY PWR Standards!

40 Minnesota: Spectrum of Work-Based Learning Experiences Internships/ Co- Ops: Students participate in paid work experience with employer, school coordinator and student agreeing to follow training plan. Students take vocational and work related classes at school. Entrepreneurship: Students create an alternate work program, are their own boss, earn money, create a project, run their business, and earn high school credit. Rotations: Students work in a number of different departments or for different employers, to explore different occupations within an industry cluster. Tours: Students take part in tours of worksites. Employer-led tours of site which provides students with information on requirements of different jobs. Job Shadowing: Students make brief worksite visits to spend time with individual workers learning what their jobs entail. Mentoring: Students are paired with “adult peers” from the workplace who provide guidance and encouragement on career-related, interdisciplinary projects. Service Learning: Students unpaid work, geared to the public good, integrated with school learning through projects or similar mechanisms. Youth Apprenticeship: The integration of academic instruction and work-based learning. The student commits to one or two years of paid work experience in a specific trade and is registered as a youth apprentice. Rotations Job Shadowing Mentoring Entrepre- neurship Service Learning Internships /Co-Op Youth Appren- ticeship Tours

41 Photo by angela7dreams - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License with Haiku Deck

42 Academic and Career Planning/Management Job Search Skills Youth Development and Leadership Career and Work-Readiness Skills Work-Based Learning Financial Literacy The Art of Communicating -Without Words Do You Have the Universal Skills Employers Are Seeking? Why Should I Hire You? Know What You Want … and What You Have to Offer Getting to the Nitty Gritty with STEM – Informational Interviews Who Needs a Resume Anyway? OK – I Have a Resume, Now What? What Have We Learned & How Do We Use It? Putting It All Together: The Career Development Checklist Thoughtful yearly registration

43 Photo by Alan Cleaver - Creative Commons Attribution License with Haiku Deck Personal Financial Literacy

44 Photo by Kasaa - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License with Haiku Deck PWR Plan/Portfolio

45 � ILPs as an Integral Part of Electronic Career Information Systems ILPs as an Integral Part of Electronic Career Information Systems � Career Portfolios Career Portfolios

46 Career Development REPEATS!

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48 Freshman Year (9th Grade) � Meet your academic advisor and make a four-year plan that includes: � Classes and tests you need to graduate and go to college or another type of higher education � Classes and activities that match your skills and interests � Possible college, job and career goals � Any accommodations you may need � Discuss your plan with family members or other caring adults � Use a planner to help you stay organized � Work with a peer mentor to discover your best learning strategies � Take interest surveys to get to know yourself and your interests better � Build friendships with people who bring out the best in you � Get involved in your community through a fun activity � Find an interesting afterschool or summer job, internship or volunteer position � Learn about bank accounts, open one and start saving for your future! � Become friends with at least one person you feel comfortable talking to when you feel nervous or need help

49 Sophomore Year (10th grade): � With your advisor, review and adjust your four-year plan to include: � Any changes in graduation or college requirements � Any changes in your interests, goals or accommodations � Classes and activities that match your skills and interests � Continue to discuss your plan with family members or other caring adults � Watch/read videos, blogs and books on subjects that interest you � Research three college majors and three careers related to these subjects � Learn about these careers in real life by: � Going on three job-shadows � Meeting professionals for three informational interviews � Try new learning strategies, like starting a study group with friends with similar interests � Sign up for the Preliminary SAT or other prep tests to get a feel for what college entry tests are like � Stay involved in fun activities in your community � Pursue interesting afterschool or summer work experiences � Ask adults for tips on managing your money and keep saving! � Learn about how your health care is paid for and begin to schedule your own doctors’ appointments � Learn how to cook, shop, do laundry and access transportation options available in your community

50 Junior Year (11th grade): � Review and adjust your four-year plan to include: � Your college, job and career goals � Classes, tests and applications required for these colleges � Education and training needed for these careers � Steps you will take to get this education and training � Discuss your plan with family members or other caring adults � Study hard and get good grades � Sign up for the SAT, ACT or other entry tests like the ASVAB � Research available financial aid options � Visit three different types of colleges or technical schools with family or friends � Connect with an adult mentor to help you identify and achieve your goals � Seek opportunities to practice the "soft skills" (like communication and teamwork) you need to find, keep and advance in a job � Take on a leadership position in an afterschool club or community activity � Make time for exercise and stress relief � Find an afterschool or summer work experience related to your goals � Learn how college loans work and keep saving for your future

51 Senior Year (12th grade) � Review and adjust your four-year plan to include: � Any changes to your college, job and career goals � Classes, tests and applications required for these colleges � Education and training needed for these jobs or careers � Steps you will take to get this education and training � Discuss your plan with family members or other caring adults � Study hard and get good grades � Take the SAT, ACT or other entry tests, like COMPASS � Apply to a variety of colleges or jobs � Apply for scholarships and financial aid � Take on a leadership position in an afterschool club or community activity � Keep working with your mentor and seek additional opportunities to develop your soft skills � Talk with your friends, family and other caring adults about supporting your hopes and addressing your fears for the future � Don’t be afraid to ask for help! � Learn about credit scores and keep saving for your future � CELEBRATE YOUR GRADUATION!!! � Begin thinking about your next four-year plan!

52 Photo by mikecogh - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License with Haiku Deck

53 Photo by LVCHEN - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License with Haiku Deck

54 Photo by marsmet543 - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License with Haiku Deck

55 Photo by JD Hancock - Creative Commons Attribution License with Haiku Deck

56 CTE12345 CAREER PATHWAYS12345 PLANS OF STUDY12345 ICAP Middle School Transition How Confident are you in…

57 Photo by marsmet543 - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License with Haiku Deck

58 CTE: Career & Technical Education

59 CAREER PATHWAYS

60 SKIRANCH CIENCECIENCE INESTHETICSINESTHETICS NFO TECHNOLOGYNFO TECHNOLOGY AGAG IBUSINESSIBUSINESS NIMALHUSBANDRYNIMALHUSBANDRY E VIRONMENTALSCIENCEVIRONMENTALSCIENCE AD & CHEMISTRYAD & CHEMISTRY EALTH & HISTROY & HYDROPONICE & HYDRO- ENGINEERING BEER IOLOGYIOLOGY COLOGYCOLOGY NGINEERINGNGINEERING OBOTICSOBOTICS

61 FOOD FEED THC BOSS CREATE CARE STEAMIT TOURISM SAGESOLAR

62 & Guide

63 Photo by marsmet543 - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License with Haiku Deck

64 Photo by abbyladybug - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License with Haiku Deck

65 How can a partnership with you/your entity benefit the school and student body?

66 How do you/your entity keep up with specific needs to accept, place, hire, train, motivate, engage and retain students?

67 With the lens of Career & College Readiness, what do you do best to support the unique community of Eagle (and High Country Consortium)?

68 What barriers do you see are present with our graduates and how do/can you(your entity) make a positive impact?

69 Final Thoughts: Please leave us with an overall message

70 Photo by alexanderdrachmann - Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License with Haiku Deck

71 Photo by Jaclyn Auletta - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License with Haiku Deck

72 Photo by AhmadHashim - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License with Haiku Deck

73 Photo by marsmet543 - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License with Haiku Deck

74 Photo by Jordi Payà Canals - Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License with Haiku Deck

75 Photo by Chris_J - Creative Commons Attribution License with Haiku Deck

76 Photo by SkyFireXII - Creative Commons Attribution License with Haiku Deck

77 Photo by BenLucier - Creative Commons Attribution License with Haiku Deck

78 Photo by ~Urban Prowler~ (www.anshumm.com) - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License with Haiku Deck https://resources.cccs.edu/education-services/career-college-readiness/

79 Photo by Mantissa.ca - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License with Haiku Deck


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