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19 Districts 72 Principals WHY STUDENTS DROP OUT  Most empirically robust predictor of drop out is academic failure (Allensworth & Easton, 2005; Berktold,

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Presentation on theme: "19 Districts 72 Principals WHY STUDENTS DROP OUT  Most empirically robust predictor of drop out is academic failure (Allensworth & Easton, 2005; Berktold,"— Presentation transcript:

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2 19 Districts 72 Principals

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4 WHY STUDENTS DROP OUT  Most empirically robust predictor of drop out is academic failure (Allensworth & Easton, 2005; Berktold, Geis, & Kaufman, 1998; Harlow, 2003; Jordan McPartland, & Lara, 1999; Kemple, Herlihy & Smith, 2005; Markow & Scheer, 2002).  Students who drop out are NOT connected to school (Berktold, Geis, & Kaufman, 1998; Harlow, 2003 : Jerald, 2006; Bridgeland, DiIulio, & Morison, 2006).  24% of students who drop out are unable to identify an adult in the school by whom they feel supported (2006 High School Survey of Student Engagement).

5 “Students who quit school don’t just suddenly drop out; it’s more of a slow fade. Typically it begins in the ninth grade if not earlier, often when life hits a particularly nasty patch and racking up credits in class no longer seems especially compelling or plausible” (Wallis, 2007). According to Layne (2009), high school dropout percentages are a severe issue in the United States. The financial and public costs of dropping out of school are great. Imprisonment, poverty, unemployment, healthcare, and welfare are concerns that seem to subsist in the lives of high school dropouts (Martin, N., Halerin, S., 2006).

6 WHAT DROP OUT COSTS  $10,000 less in average yearly income for students who drop out of school (HHS, 2006).  Each student who drops out costs the federal government $260,000 over course of lifetime (Rouse, 2005).  A 5% increase in graduation rates of male students alone would equate to savings of $8 billion in crime related costs (Alliance for Excellent Education, 2006).

7 STATEMENT OF PROBLEM SIGNIFICANCE OF STUDY Mississippi’s high school graduation rate of 62% is one of the lowest in the nation. The graduation rate of students with disabilities is even more alarming: only 29% of these students graduate with a regular high school diploma. Suspensions and expulsions, which put kids further and further behind in school, undoubtedly contribute to our dropout problem. Research has consistently shown that those dropping out of school are more likely to have been suspended or expelled more than their peers who remained in school through graduation (Mississippi Youth Justice Project [SPLC], 2008). Many situations during early childhood lead to later school dropout. The influences develop from many personal and related risk issues and the harmful relations between them. As students feel forced out of schools, other social conditions such as time with friends, time at home, and the world of work pull at students as more desirable and practical options. Early identification of the needs of specific students, groups of students, families, schools, and communities would contribute to more helpful methods for identifying at-risk populations and communicating with them. (Hernandez & Simbeni, 2008) Dryfoos,1990; Wheelock & Dorman, 1988).

8 Purpose Research Questions  The purpose of this study was to investigate high school principal’s perception of school dropout and to identify factors that contribute to school dropouts in school districts in Central Mississippi.  This study was designed to answer the following research questions:  1. What factors do administrators believe cause the students to drop out of regular school as measured by the administrators’ responses on the SSDS Questionnaire?  2.How do the administrators’ perceptions differ regarding the school factors that caused students to drop out of regular school as measured by the administrators’ responses on the SSDS Questionnaire?  3.How do the administrators’ perceptions differ regarding the academic factors that influenced the students’ decision to drop out of regular school as measured by the administrators’ responses on the SSDS Questionnaire?  4. How do the administrators’ perceptions differ regarding the personal factors that contribute to the students’ decision to drop out of regular school as measured by the administrators’ responses on the SSDS Questionnaire?  5. How do the administrators’ perceptions differ regarding the other related factors that influenced the students’ decision to drop out of regular school as measured by the administrators’ responses on the SSDS Questionnaire?

9  As Willis (2007) stated, students who quit school begin to show signs of problems in the ninth grade if not earlier. According to Layne (2009), there are anticipatory events in place, and steps should be taken to provide assistance to guarantee that every student is afforded the opportunity to finish school, especially since President Barack Obama expressed his support for school completion because of what it means for the prosperity of the United States of America  Table 44 is a presentation of the top ten factors given by the administrators that they believe result in students dropping out of high school.  Bridgeland et al. (2009) reported that lack of support from the home was a factor contributing to dropping out of school. The lack of parental support was also supported by research conducted by Bridgeland, Dilulio, Streeter, & Mason, (2008).

10 RankInfluencers of Dropping OutPercent Students did not attend school on a daily basis before they left secondary school Falling behind or failing course work caused students to leave school early Having a baby or child care was a reason students left secondary school without graduating Family problems caused students to leave school before graduating Being held in the same grade caused students to leave school without graduating The need to stay home to care for a baby or family member caused students to leave school without graduating Lack of success in the state subject area tests caused students to leave school early Mom/dad did not care if the student graduated, and that caused the student to leave school before graduating The use of drugs caused students to leave school before graduating Being incarcerated/in jail caused students to leave school before graduating Top Ten Reasons Influencing Dropouts

11 “Why can’t we finish the last sentence as automatically as we do the others?” John Herner (NASDE President) Counterpoint 1998 “If a child doesn’t know how to read,we teach.” “If a child doesn’t know how to swim, “If a child doesn’t know how to multiply, “If a child doesn’t know how to drive, “If a child doesn’t know how to behave, we teach.” we punish!

12  Behavior is learned and serves a specific purpose.  Behavior is related to the context in which it occurs.  For every year a behavior is in place it takes at least one month for that behavior to have a significant change.  Children comply with the rules 80% of the time. However they are complimented for their behavior less than….. 2% of the time

13 Research indicates that you can improve behavior by 80% just by pointing out what someone is doing correctly.

14 School Rules NO Food NO Weapons NO Backpacks NO Drugs/Smoking NO Bullying Redesign learning & teaching environments


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