Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Class Rank Honoring Academic Rigor and Preparation for Success in College Class Rank Honoring Academic Rigor and Preparation for Success in College.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Class Rank Honoring Academic Rigor and Preparation for Success in College Class Rank Honoring Academic Rigor and Preparation for Success in College."— Presentation transcript:

1 Class Rank Honoring Academic Rigor and Preparation for Success in College Class Rank Honoring Academic Rigor and Preparation for Success in College

2 Why Do We Rank Students? Class rank is used solely for the purposes of: college admission college admission scholarship eligibility scholarship eligibility

3 College Success Research shows that the most important factor for success in college is the rigor of coursework taken in high school “The best predictor post-high school success is the quality and intensity of High School curriculum” “The best predictor post-high school success is the quality and intensity of High School curriculum” Cliff Adelman, Answers in the Tool Box, U.S. Department of Education

4 Why Did NEISD Develop the Current Policy? Under the previous policy: Academic and Non-Academic courses had the same value i.e. Office Assistant vs. English Cheerleading vs. Calculus, etc.. Class rank was not a true indicator of rigor and academic preparedness for college success. There was a lack of incentive for taking rigorous coursework, and Multiple students were tied for rank

5 Differences Between the Previous Policy and the Current Policy The current policy uses cumulative weighted rank points for selected courses The previous policy used an overall Grade Point Average for all courses

6 What Does the New Rank Policy Me asure ? The policy measures each student’s academic performance and rigor in selected courses: English English math math science science social studies social studies foreign language foreign language All Pre-AP and AP courses All Pre-AP and AP courses

7 HS Academic Excellence Committee Convened in Responsibilities: Review current rank in class policy Study various ranking scenarios Provide Superintendent with recommendations for change Common Goal Ensure rank in class represents academic preparation for college success Fairness and equity for students

8 High School Academic Excellence Committee High School Academic Excellence Committee Chair: Theresa Miller, Guidance Chair: Theresa Miller, Guidance Central Office Personnel: Mark Scheffler, Campus Support Alicia Thomas, Instruction Central Office Personnel: Mark Scheffler, Campus Support Alicia Thomas, Instruction Jerry Comalander, Athletics David Cook, Data Processing Don Dalton, Curriculum Compliance Carol Harle, School Improvement Judith Moening, Special Education Doris Kays, Curriculum Compliance Michael Lara, Research & Ed Technology Carol Mendenhall, Staff Development Elizabeth Platt, Career & Technology Diana Schumacher, Fine Arts Campus Administration & Staff: Churchill – Joe Reasons, Principal Jeanette Salinas, Assistant Principal Linda Steitle, Dean - English Carl Gustafson, Athletics ISA – Shari Albright, Director Heidi Anderson, Dean – Math/Science Lee – Donna Taylor, Principal Lee Matthew, Assistant Principal Ileana Liberatore, Foreign Language Monica Ruiz, Fine Arts MacArthur – Wendell Watson, Principal Sofia Gallo, Counselor Perry Calloway, Career & Technology David Bordelon, Dean - Science Madison – Bobby Smith, Principal Doug Lansing, Assistant Principal Angelina Kiser, Teacher – Math/Computer Science Jim Streety, Athletics Reagan – Joe Hannon, Principal Elaine Hitzfelder, Assistant Principal Diane Seitz, Counselor Stephen Gibbs, Dean-Social Studies Lori Hollis, Career & Technology Roosevelt – Robert Todd, Principal Melvin Echard, Assistant Principal Natalie Bates, Counselor Barbara Dielmann, DATA Counselor Bill Sturgis, Career & Technology Pam Walls, Special Education Parent & Community Members: Steve Albert Martha Bazan Yolanda Edwards Sybil Pici Becky Roberson Jeannie Wiedenbach Karen Wilson Parent & Community Members: Steve Albert Martha Bazan Yolanda Edwards Sybil Pici Becky Roberson Jeannie Wiedenbach Karen Wilson

9 The student with the most points is ranked #1. How is Class Rank determined? Semester grade x Rank Factor = Rank Points Sum of all Rank Points = Cumulative Rank Points Cumulative Rank Points of each student compared to all students in class = Rank Position

10 2006 Class Rank Clarification Process In Summer 2006, the NEISD Board of Trustees approved revisions that went into effect immediately based on input obtained from parentscounselorsadministrators district staff

11 What Are the New Revisions? Increase existing rank factors for all Advanced Placement (AP), Pre-Advanced Placement (Pre-AP) and Honors courses: Pre-AP/GT-Pre AP/Honors = 1.15 previously 1.1 was used AP/GT-AP = 1.29 previously 1.2 was used

12 What Are the New Revisions? Increase existing rank factors for all Advanced Placement (AP), Pre- Advanced Placement (Pre-AP) and Honors courses:Increase existing rank factors for all Advanced Placement (AP), Pre- Advanced Placement (Pre-AP) and Honors courses: Pre-AP/GT-Pre-AP/Honors = 1.15 previously 1.1 was used AP/GT-AP = 1.29 previously 1.2 was used

13 What Are the New Revisions? Exclude all Summer School and Evening School courses from rank Limit the number of semester courses used in the calculation of class rank to no more than eight per semester (the highest eight ranked grades will be used) Include all AP and Pre-AP non-core courses in calculation of class rank Break any ties between students by using a secondary indicator based on the number of courses taken for which a weight of 1.15 and/or 1.29 was given

14 How Did NEISD Communicate the New Policy? How Did NEISD Communicate the New Policy? Spring 2004 District meetings held at high schools to explain the new ranking policy—middle school parents invited Supporting materials posted on the Guidance Website Fall 2004 Counselors held small group meetings with ninth graders to review important topics including rank Spring 2005 HS and MS counselor held meetings with groups of students to explain graduation requirements and rank General orientation meeting held prior to course fair held in January High school course catalog contained graduation requirements with reference to class rank and a separate rank policy explanation—printed in a special section for incoming 9th graders

15 How Did NEISD Communicate the New Policy How Did NEISD Communicate the New Policy Fall 2005 Counselors held small group meetings with ninth graders to review important topics including rank Spring 2006 HS counselors met with groups of ninth graders to review requirements for graduation and important topics such as class rank General orientation meeting held prior to course fair Detailed letter mailed home with end-of-year report card explaining new policy clarifications Updated supporting documents posted on Guidance website Summer 2006 North East Connections mailed to all residing in NEISD with a special article, “Update: High school rank system changes.” Fall 2006 Students received Class Rank on their report card for 1st nine weeks with an explanatory handout HS counselors held Class Rank meeting for all 10th and 11th graders and their parents

16 How Did The New Policy Influence Rigor? Top 30 Pre-AP/AP Courses

17 Current Sophomores ( ) #1 Position

18 Distribution of Ranked Courses by Level Current Sophomores ( ) in Top 10% N=89

19 Current Juniors ( )

20 Distribution of Ranked Courses by Level Current Juniors ( ) in Top 10% N=86

21 Why not consider an Overall Rank Average?

22 Student AStudent B Rank Example Current Juniors (06-07) Rank Example Current Juniors (06-07) Total Ranked Classes 18 Rank points Ranked GPA Position: Cumulative 206 Position: Ranked GPA 23 Total Ranked Classes 24 Rank points 2277 Ranked GPA 94.9 Position: Cumulative 14 Position: Ranked GPA 211 ALG II-PRE-AP ALG II-PRE-AP BIO PRE AP BIO PRE AP CHEM PRE AP CHEM PRE AP ENG I PRE AP ENG I PRE AP ENG II PRE AP ENG II PRE AP GEOMETRY PRE-AP GEOMETRY PRE-AP LATIN II LATIN II PRE-AP LATIN III LATIN III SPANISH I SPANISH I COMP SCI PR-AP COMP SCI PR-AP W GEO-PRE-AP W GEO-PRE-AP W HISTORY W HISTORY ALG II-PRE-AP ALG II-PRE-AP BIO PRE AP BIO PRE AP CHEM PRE AP CHEM PRE AP ENG I PRE AP ENG I PRE AP ENG II PRE AP ENG II PRE AP GEOMETRY PRE- AP GEOMETRY PRE- AP JAPANESE I JAPANESE I SPANISH I SPANISH I W HIS-PRE-AP W HIS-PRE-AP

23 The Problem with Averaging Rank Points GPA Rank Points GPA

24 Example: Students Sorted by Rank GPA

25 Example: Students Sorted by Cumulative Points

26 Pattern of data suggests that both quantity and quality of coursework are important Conclusion: Many calculation methods are possible for determining students’ class rank. However, a cumulative rank point total honors both quantity and quality of students’ academic course work. Current Sophomores ( ) #1 Position

27 Questions?


Download ppt "Class Rank Honoring Academic Rigor and Preparation for Success in College Class Rank Honoring Academic Rigor and Preparation for Success in College."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google