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Chapter 5 Developing Flexibility A Wellness Way of Life Ninth Edition Robbins/Powers/Burgess © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 5 Developing Flexibility A Wellness Way of Life Ninth Edition Robbins/Powers/Burgess © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 5 Developing Flexibility A Wellness Way of Life Ninth Edition Robbins/Powers/Burgess © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

2 What stage of change are you in? Do you stretch during cool-down?

3 Flexibility The ability of a joint to move freely through its full range of motion. Flexibility tends to decrease with age, disuse, injury, excessive body fat, and muscle imbalances. © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

4 Study Question 1 What are the benefits of and five cautions for stretching? © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

5 Benefits of Flexibility Decreased aches and pains. Enhanced ability to move freely and easily. Possible decreased risk of injury. Recovery from injury. Enhanced athletic performance. Reversal of age-related decline in flexibility. Improved posture and appearance. Decreased muscle soreness after exercise. It feels good. © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

6 Study Question 2 What factors affect flexibility? © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

7 Factors Affecting Flexibility Joint Structure Soft Tissues Inactivity Muscle Temperature Increased Age Genetics Gender Obesity Injury and Scar Tissue Neural Factors © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

8 Study Question 3 What are the two types of flexibility? © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

9 Types of Flexibility Static –Range of motion that is achieved through slow controlled stretching. –Most commonly used and recommended type. Dynamic –Range of motion that is achieved through moving a limb to its limits in a ballistic fashion. –Associated with increased muscle soreness and the stretch reflex. –Used more in athletic competition. Not recommended for personal fitness programs due to risk of injury. © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

10 Study Question 4 What are the four types of stretching? © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

11 Active Static or Active Dynamic vs. Passive Static or Passive Dynamic Active stretching uses your own muscle forces to stretch yourself. Passive stretching uses someone or something else to assist with a stretch (body weight, gravity, strap or leverage). © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

12 Study Question 5 What are some basic guidelines for flexibility development? © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

13 Guidelines of Flexibility Development Frequency – 2 to 3 days a week (up to 7 days if possible). Intensity – slightly beyond the normal range of motion to the point of tension. Time – 10 to 30 second static hold. Repetitions – at least 4 sustained stretches for each muscle group. Guidelines – warm-up first, stretch to prepare for activity, cool-down stretch is most beneficial, stop at the point of discomfort, DON’T bounce, strive for muscular balance. © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

14 Study Question 6 What are the five principles of flexibility development? © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

15 Principles for Flexibility Development Progressive overload –Improvement in joint range of motion occurs when sustained stretching produces elastic and plastic elongation. Specificity –Flexibility is specific to each joint, i.e., an individual could do the splits but have poor shoulder range of motion. Reversibility –If a persons stops stretching, over time, range of motion will decrease. Balance –Muscles can be tighter on one side of the body. Pay attention to flexibility differences and work to improve them. Individual Differences –People vary in their ability to develop flexibility. © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

16 Study Question 7 What are five flexibility exercises for basic fitness? © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

17 Common Flexibility Exercises Hamstring stretch Lower back/hip flexor stretch Spinal twist Quadriceps stretch Calf/Achilles stretch Iliotibial band stretch Deltoid stretch Pectoral stretch Triceps stretch © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

18 Flexibility Exercises Figure 5-1 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

19 Study Question 8 Can you differentiate between the safe and contraindicated exercises illustrated in this chapter? © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

20 Contraindicated Exercises Do not hyperflex or hyperextend the knee, neck, or lower back. Do not twist the knee. Avoid holding your breath. Avoid stretching long weak muscles (abdominals) and shortening short/strong muscles (hip flexors). Avoid stretching to the point of pain. Be especially careful when using passive stretches with another person. Avoid movements that place acute compressional force on spinal discs. Avoid movements that cause joint impingements or cartilage damage. If your sport requires the violation of good mechanics make certain the muscles are as strong as possible. © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

21 Study Question 9 What are the general guidelines for identifying exercises that increase risk of injury? © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

22 Exercises to Avoid Avoid the following exercises: Yoga plow, knee tuck to chest, head roll, hurdler stretch, full squat, standing toe touch, ballet bar leg stretch, windmill toe touches, straight-leg sit-up, double-leg lift, swan arch, donkey kicks Do the following: Single-knee tuck to chest (hugging thigh), half-head rolls, alternative hurdler stretch, half-knee bend, lying hamstring stretch, sitting hamstring stretch, oblique abdominal curls, bent-knee ab curls, single arm/leg raises, modified donkey kicks. There are some exceptions to these guidelines for those who are well conditioned and can minimize risk. © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

23 Study Question 10 How do flexibility and muscular fitness contribute to wellness? © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.


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