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Improving Student Achievement: Learning Supports Common Agency Learning Session August 16, 2005 Grant Wood Area Education Agency.

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Presentation on theme: "Improving Student Achievement: Learning Supports Common Agency Learning Session August 16, 2005 Grant Wood Area Education Agency."— Presentation transcript:

1 Improving Student Achievement: Learning Supports Common Agency Learning Session August 16, 2005 Grant Wood Area Education Agency

2 2 Learning Supports Learning Supports Planning Committee Julie Barnd, School Social Worker Roxann Dittmer, Early Access Specialist Katie Goddard, School Social Worker Daryl Hanneman, School Psychologist Trish Schultz, School Social Worker Anne Taylor, School Improvement Consultant Denese Toomey, School Social Worker

3 3 Goals for this Session Learning Supports To become acquainted with the concept of Learning Supports Learning Supports To develop an interest in learning more about Learning Supports Learning Supports To plan how we may each contribute to Learning Supports Learning Supports To develop a common vocabulary pertaining to Learning Supports

4 4 We plan to... Learning SupportsDescribe Learning Supports services Identify barriers to learning Discuss some pertinent GWAEA data Discuss internal vs. external LEA data Learning SupportsDiscuss the relationship between Learning Supports and: –Instructional Decision Making (IDM) –Iowa Professional Development Model (IPDM) Learning SupportsDiscuss the research base for Learning Supports

5 5 Additional Learning Supports Information is Available on the GWAEA Website: Go to GWAEA homepage Click on: –Curriculum, Instruction, & AssessmentCurriculum, Instruction, & Assessment –Learning Supports Learning SupportsLearning Supports

6 6 The Vision For every student in every school and community in Iowa to achieve at high levels requires that school districts, in collaboration with their community partners, develop a comprehensive, cohesive approach to delivery of learning supports that is an integral part of their school improvement efforts.

7 7 Point Change is necessary to ensure that all children have an equal opportunity to succeed

8 8  Provides support for the academic development of students  Also has a history of providing support for the social, emotional, and behavioral development of students, including: The Iowa Behavioral Initiative, Success4, Learning Supports,Learning Supports, Spring, present The Iowa Department of Education...

9 9 Additional Background Information Iowa Collaboration for Youth Development (ICYD), 2004 – present –A state-wide interagency partnership designed to better align policies and programs for youth- related issues. Includes: Governor’s office Iowa Department of Public Health Iowa Department of Education Iowa Department of Human Services Iowa Department of Workforce Development Iowa Department of Criminal & Juvenile Justice

10 10 Additional Background Information Federal and state mandates such as No Child Left Behind, the Iowa Accountability Plan, etc. require that all students succeed in school. Since 2003, a great deal of effort has been focused on academic areas such as math, reading, and science. Learning SupportsBeginning this fall, there will be increased efforts to design and implement comprehensive systems of Learning Supports (supports for the learning environment).

11 11 Iowa Department of Education Timeline Phase One, Design: –Concept paper –Multi-agency planning Phase Two, Early Implementation: –AEA capacity building –Field testing in selected sites –Communication and mobilization (commitment building) Phase Three, Scaling Up: 2007 and beyond... –From field test to statewide implementation

12 12 Learning Supports Learning Supports are not: –An initiative –Attached to a distribution of funds Learning Supports Learning Supports are: –A means of strengthening existing resources –A systemic, multi-agency way of doing business –Based on using effective, research-based programs and strategies

13 13 Learning Supports Learning Supports Goals All children and youth in Iowa are… –Successful in school –Healthy and socially competent –Prepared for a productive adulthood –In safe and supportive families, schools and communities

14 14 Pupil Services Special Education Physical Education After-School Programs Psychological Testing Health Education HIV/Aids Prevention Health Services Clinic Nutrition Education School Lunch Program Drug Prevention Drug Services Counseling Smoking Cessation For Staff Codes of Discipline Pregnancy Prevention Social Services Child Protective Services HIV/AIDS Services Community-Based Organizations Mental Health Services Juvenile Court Services Violence & Crime Prevention School Adapted from: Health is Academic: A guide to Coordinated School Health Programs (1998). Edited by E. Marx & S.F. Wooley with D. Northrop. New York: Teachers College Press. Which of these address student learning?

15 15 Learning Supports Learning Supports Defined... Wide ranging strategies, programs, services, and practices that are implemented to create conditions and environments that promote student learning. Learning SupportsLearning Supports: –Promote healthy development for all students –Prevent problems for students –Provide early interventions after the onset of problems –Address the complex, intensive needs of some students –Address barriers to learning –Ensure that all students have an equitable opportunity to succeed in school

16 16 Learning Supports Learning Supports Purpose... Learning Supports To enhance Iowa’s existing system of Learning Supports by embedding it into the Iowa school improvement process so that all students have an equal opportunity to succeed in school

17 17 Learning Supports Implementation of Learning Supports leads to results such as: Enhanced academic achievement Improved school attendance Fewer behavior problems Improved interpersonal skills Better relationships between schools and families Better relationships for students, both at home and at school

18 18 Learning Supports? Who Provides Learning Supports? Learning SupportsIn schools, Learning Supports may be provided by administrators, general education teachers, special education teachers, student service personnel, paraeducators, support staff, and other staff. Learning SupportsProvision of Learning Supports, however, is not limited to school personnel. Families and communities also have critical contributions to make to the successful learning of all children and youth.

19 19 Guiding Principles

20 20 Guiding Principles Schools must address barriers to learning and teaching in order to accomplish their instructional mission. School – Community - Family collaboration is essential. Cohesive leadership and aligned policy are needed at every level.

21 21 Point School-Community-Family collaboration is essential In achieving success

22 22 Our Instructional Mission: To increase student proficiency in reading, math, and science To improve attendance at school To increase graduation rates To increase connectedness to school To foster students’ social and emotional well-being To decrease achievement gaps To decrease dropout, suspension, and expulsion rates

23 23 Steps to accomplishing our mission... Improve instruction Enhance the professional development of teachers and educational leaders Nurture the healthy development of students Systematically address barriers to learning and teaching

24 24 Academic Instruction Component (Direct facilitation of learning) Leadership Component (Governance and Resource Management) Learning Supports Component (Addressing Barriers to Development & Learning) Three Components for Guiding School Efforts to Enhance Student Outcomes All Iowa youth are successful in school

25 25 Point Cohesive leadership and aligned policy are needed at every level to achieve success

26 26 Some students do well in school… Some do not What makes the difference?

27 27 Let’s Brainstorm about Barriers

28 28 Activity On an index card, list five “barriers” that regularly get in the way of students benefiting from instruction in your schools:

29 29 Were these barriers mentioned? Mental health issues Family problems Neighborhood issues Health problems Substance abuse Teen pregnancy Anger management problems Lack of connection to school Lack of relevant curriculum Poverty

30 30 Point Educators must address barriers to learning and teaching to accomplish the mission of success for all students

31 31 A Closer Look at Barriers...

32 32 Achievement Gaps Gaps exist among subgroups listed in the No Child Left Behind legislation: –Students eligible for free and reduced lunch –English language learners –Students with disabilities –Some ethnic and minority groups The Annual Condition of Education Report, 2003

33 33 Poverty is a Barrier Poverty is the leading indicator for poor student performance because of inadequate:  Food  Shelter  Child care  Medical care  Transportation Less exposure to oral and written language Increased mobility Narrowing the Achievement Gap, ”Ed Source”, January, 2003

34 34 Early Childhood Statistics 2000 Family Poverty Data (0 – 5) GWAEACounty Ranking (1 – 99) Percentage Benton176.6 Cedar45.0 Iowa34.9 Johnson287.7 Jones509.5 Linn226.9 Washington308.0

35 35 Poverty Trends in AEA 10 (K-12) % of Students Eligible for Free or Reduced-Price School Meals Source: Iowa Department of Education Benton Cedar Iowa Johnson Jones Linn Washington

36 36 Mobility is a Barrier Students who have changed schools 4 times or more by 8 th grade are at least 4 times more likely to drop out. Problems getting into school may include: –Residency requirements –Availability of school records –Birth certificates –Legal guardianship –Transportation –Lack of pre-school programs –Immunization requirements –Physical examination records “Mobility and Achievement Gap” Skandera and Sousa, Hoover Digest, 2002

37 37 Breaking Down Barriers

38 38 Adelman-Taylor Model UCLA School Mental Health Project Provides useful model for understanding how barriers keep youth from achieving academically –Federally funded resource center for school mental health –Howard Adelman & Linda Taylor –Will be at GWAEA on October 17 to work with AEA and LEA staff and parents

39 39 Barriers to Learning Learning Supports Successful in School Core Instruction Range of Learners = Motivationally ready & able to learn 1 2 = Encounter some barriers and may be lacking prerequisite knowledge & skills 3 = Encounter complex and intensive barriers to learning 1. Supplements to Instruction 2. Family Supports and Involvement 3. Community Partnerships 4. Safe, Healthy, and Caring Environments 5. Transitions 6. Child/Youth Engagement

40 40 Barriers to Learning Learning Supports Successful in School Core Instruction Range of Learners = Motivationally ready & able to learn 1 2 = Encounter some barriers and may be lacking prerequisite knowledge & skills 3 = Encounter complex and intensive barriers to learning Focusing solely on instruction will not help students in groups 2 & 3 succeed

41 41 Task: Increase Student Proficiency Although approximately 70% of Iowa students are proficient in reading and math, the rate of growth is beginning to slow down. Iowa Department of Education, 2005

42 42 Test scores have flattened out... The Plateau Effect

43 43 Point Student proficiency will plateau unless the learning environment is restructured

44 44 Learning Supports Content for Learning Supports Learning SupportsBy organizing the content for Learning Supports into six areas, a unifying framework can be utilized to develop a school-community continuum of supports. Schools and communities are already implementing some programs and services that address the six content areas. However, many of these operate in isolation of one another and do not provide a cohesive, comprehensive approach.

45 45 Learning Supports, cont. Content for Learning Supports, cont. By organizing the supports along a continuum of student needs, schools and communities are more likely to provide the right services for the right students at the right time. Such a continuum encompasses efforts to positively affect a full spectrum of learning, physical, social-emotional, and behavioral problems in every school and community in Iowa.

46 46 Instructional Decision Making Model For all students 70 – 75% For some students 20 – 25% For a few students 1 – 7% SupplementalInstruction IntensiveInstruction Core Instruction Instruction

47 47 The Six Content Areas: 1.Supplements to Instruction: Fostering healthy cognitive, social-emotional, and physical development 2.Family Supports and Involvement: Promoting and enhancing (not blaming) the involvement of parents and family members in education 3.Community Partnerships: Participating with multiple sectors of the community to build linkages and collaborations offering youth development services, opportunities, and supports

48 48 The Six Content Areas, cont. 4.Safe, Healthy, and Caring Environments: Providing environments, school-wide, that ensure the physical and psychological well-being and safety of all children and youth through positive youth development efforts and proactive planning for management of emergencies, crises, and follow-up 5. Transitions Enhancing the school's ability to address a variety of transition concerns that confront children, youth, and their families 6. Child/Youth Engagement Providing opportunities for youth to be engaged in and contribute to their communities

49 49 Point There are six content areas for Learning Supports

50 50 Quick Reflection Learning SupportsName 10 things you have learned about Learning Supports so far:

51 51 Looking at Data

52 52 Pre-Kindergarteners Left Behind (Gilliam, 2005, Yale Child Study Center) Foundation for Child Development: Expulsion rates in state pre-kindergarten programs:  Pre-kindergarten students were expelled 3 times more than children in grades K-12.  4 year olds were expelled 1.5 times more than 3 year olds.  Boys were expelled 4.5 times more than girls.  African Americans attending state funded pre-k were expelled 2 times more than Latino and Caucasian children, and expelled 5 times more than Asian-American children.

53 53 Pre-Kindergarteners Left Behind (Gilliam, 2005, Yale Child Study Center) Foundation for Child Development: In Iowa:  2% of teachers reported expelling at least one pre-kindergartener over the past year.  Iowa’s pre-kindergarten expulsion rate of 2.3 per 1,000 is over 5 times higher than our K- 12 expulsion rate of 0.4 per 1,000

54 Preschool Enrollment Data % of children enrolled in public and private preschool setting AEA 10 County County Ranking (1-99) Percentage Benton Cedar Iowa Johnson952.8 Jones Linn Washington9433.2

55 55 Where can we go to find data about social, emotional, and behavioral issues?

56 56 Sources of Internal Data Office referrals (#’s, reasons, patterns) Referrals to Child Study Team Referrals to GWAEA support staff Referrals to substance abuse professionals Referrals to mental health professionals Referrals to physicians Participation in extracurricular activities Referrals to/results from conflict resolution

57 57 Sources of Internal Data, cont. Graduation rates Dropout rates Attendance records Suspensions/expulsions Weapons/drugs at school Demographic projections School climate surveys Etc.

58 58 Sources of External Data Iowa Collaboration for Youth Development Family and Community Indicator Tracking System (FACITS) Juvenile Court Department of Human Services Kids Count Empowerment/DeCat Committees Search Institute Asset Survey Iowa Youth Survey District Reports GWAEA Learning Supports Links: –http://www.aea10.k12.ia.us/curr/lrngsupports/links.htmlhttp://www.aea10.k12.ia.us/curr/lrngsupports/links.html

59 59 Iowa Youth Survey The Iowa Youth Survey (IYS) is administered to 6th, 8th, and 11th grade students to determine their attitudes and behaviors related to the use of: Alcohol Tobacco Other drugs Violent and disruptive behavior The survey also includes information regarding the students’ perceptions of the factors in their lives which put them at risk for problem behavior, as well as those which protect them from developing such behavior.

60 60 Iowa Youth Survey The IYS has been administered every three years since the 1980s. It will be administered again this fall. Results are disaggregated in multiple ways to meet the needs of educators and community professionals, including school districts, AEAs, judicial districts, de- categorization regions, and prevention regions. 100% of school districts in AEA 10 have signed up to participate this fall. Trend data for 1998, 2002, and 2005 will be available to districts in May, 2006

61 61 IYS Example: Connectedness to School I care about my school. I try to do my best in school. I plan to finish high school. I do the homework that is assigned.

62 62 IYS Example: Staff/Student Support My teachers care about me. Teachers available to talk one on one. Teachers notice I’m doing good job. Students treat each other with respect. School lets parents know if I’m doing a good job. At least one adult at school I could go to with a problem.

63 63 Connectedness to School Sense of belonging & being part of school Liking School Perceiving that teachers are supportive & caring Physical & emotional safety Having good friends at school Engaged in own current & future academic progress Believing that discipline is fair & effective Participating in extracurricular activities Connectedness Attendance Academic performance School completion rates Incidents of fighting, bullying, or vandalism Blum, et al

64 64 Again, Learning Supports Again, Learning Supports align with The Instructional Decision Making Model (IDM) components: –Core –Supplemental –Intensive

65 65 IDM, Academics, & Learning Supports Academic ActivitiesLearning Supports Academic ActivitiesLearning Supports Core/School-wide Activities All students

66 66 IDM, Academics, & Learning Supports Academic ActivitiesLearning Supports Academic ActivitiesLearning Supports Supplemental Services Some students Core/School-wide Activities All students

67 67 IDM, Academics, & Learning Supports Academic ActivitiesLearning Supports Academic ActivitiesLearning Supports Supplemental Services Some students Intensive Services A few students Core/School-wide Activities All students

68 68 Learning Supports Learning Supports also align with The Iowa Professional Development Model (IPDM): –Focused –Ongoing –Research-based Delivery Method –District and building Leadership Teams –Time allocated for professional development –Delivered by AEA and LEA staff collaboratively

69 69 Connecting with School Improvement The Constant Conversation Questions: –What do data tell us about learning needs? –What do we do to meet these needs? –How will we know that learning has changed? –How will we evaluate our programs/services?

70 70 Learning Supports Research Base for Learning Supports Learning SupportsThe Content Network website for Learning Supports will contain research organized into the six content areas. There will be examples of Core, Supplemental, and Intensive within most areas. LEA and AEA staff, along with parents and community partners, will determine what student needs are, based on data collected about students. The Content Network will identify research studies which show evidence that particular instructional practices have had an effect on student achievement. Based on its data, a district should be able to match the area of need to potential content options.

71 71 Learning Supports Will soon be added to the Iowa Department of Education Content Network website: Research Base for Learning Supports Will soon be added to the Iowa Department of Education Content Network website:

72 72 Point A wealth of information is currently available to guide Learning Supports decision-making

73 73 Learning Supports Teams Will Assess needs

74 74 Learning Supports Teams Will Assess needs Map resources

75 75 Learning Supports Teams Will Assess needs Map resources Plan

76 76 Learning Supports Teams Will Assess needs Map resources Plan Implement

77 77 Learning Supports Teams Will Assess needs Map resources Plan Implement Evaluate

78 78 Learning Supports Teams Will Assess needs Map resources Plan Implement Evaluate Provide Oversight

79 79 Learning Supports Teams Will Assess needs Map resources Plan Implement Evaluate Provide Oversight Provide Leadership

80 80 Learning Supports Teams Will Assess needs Map resources Plan Implement Evaluate Provide Oversight Provide Leadership Build capacity

81 81 Learning Supports Teams Will Assess needs Map resources Plan Implement Evaluate Provide Oversight Provide Leadership Build capacity Provide ongoing support

82 82 Point Learning Supports Learning Supports teams are needed for each building or family of buildings

83 83 Putting it all together Learning Supports Learning Supports are: A continuum of core, supplemental, and intensive support services which create and maintain safe and respectful environments in which: –Teachers can teach –Students can learn –Parents and community partners can contribute –Successful social, emotional, behavioral, and learning outcomes are achieved

84 84 Point Motivation for Learning Supports comes from the desire to achieve better outcomes for all youth

85 85 Thanks. Have a great year! Julie, Roxann, Katie, Daryl, Trish, Anne, & Denese


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