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Cradle to College and Career Pathway to Success. Cradle to College and Career is… A system of integrated services and professional development, both public.

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Presentation on theme: "Cradle to College and Career Pathway to Success. Cradle to College and Career is… A system of integrated services and professional development, both public."— Presentation transcript:

1 Cradle to College and Career Pathway to Success

2 Cradle to College and Career is… A system of integrated services and professional development, both public and private, that begins in the early years and leads to appropriate postsecondary success for all students that includes academic, occupational, and independent living that benefits the individual and community as a whole.

3 P-16/P-20: Envisioning a Pipeline “If people begin to see the educational system as a single entity through which people move, they may begin to behave as if all of education were related.” Harold Hodgkinson in “All One System’,

4 © The Forum for Youth Investment. Ready by 21 and the Ready by 21 Logo are registered trademarks of the Forum for Youth Investment. Improvements across systems and settings Insulated Educational Pipeline

5 What is the Logic behind P-16/P-20? Regardless of the type of system a state or local community chooses, it is important to note that the goal is the same: to create a system of education that links and coordinates each education level into a seamless system fundamentally guided by the principle that success in college begins in prekindergarten. Education Commission of the States ECS reports that over 37 states now have P-16/P-20 initiatives 5

6 What Keeps Us from Seeing the Pipeline? Focus on our own immediate issues and needs Fragmentation across levels and content areas Divisions across general, special and technical education Ineffective articulation between secondary, post–secondary and employment Lack of relationships that undergird communication Insufficient opportunities to learn about levels that precede and follow our own Infrequent opportunities to track goal attainment throughout the entire pipeline

7 7 © The Forum for Youth Investment. Ready by 21 and the Ready by 21 Logo are registered trademarks of the Forum for Youth Investment. Fragmented Funding Streams Medi-Cal – EPSDT Healthy Families Parent Expansion Child Health & Disability Program Expanded Access Primary Care Trauma Case Funding Co-payments for ER Services Child Lead Poisoning Prevention Program HIV/AIDS Prevention & Education Breast Cancer Screening Food Stamps WIC TANF GAIN, CAL Learn, Cal WORKS, etc. School-Based MH Services for Medi-Cal Kids Probation Officers in Schools Cardenas-Schiff Legislation Health Care Through Probation Mental Health Evaluations Juvenile Halls Child Care – CCDBG, SSBG, Cal WORKS Child Care, etc. After-School Programs – 21 st Century Learning Centers, etc. Promoting Safe & Stable Families Child Abuse & Neglect Programs Foster Care – Transition, Independent Living, Housing, etc. Adoption Assistance, Adoption Opportunities Public Schools ESEA, Title I School Lunch & Breakfast Head Start IDEA After-School Programs Textbook Funding Tests & Achievement Teacher Issues GED Mom Dad 9 year old 5 year old Mom’s sister Boyfriend in trouble Baby 1 1/2 Source: Dunkle, M. (2002) Understanding LA Systems that Affect Families. Los Angeles, CA: George Washington University and the LA County Children’s Planning Council EducationHealth & FoodSocial ServicesChild & Family Services Mental Health & Probation

8 What does it look like? A system of integrated services and professional development, both public and private, that leads to appropriate post- secondary success for all students. This includes academic, occupational, community participation, and independent living that benefits the individual and community as a whole.

9 Why is it important? Every school day, more than seven thousand students leave school. Annually, that adds up to about 1.3 million students. Research conducted by Cecilia Rouse, when she was professor of economics and public affairs at Princeton University, shows that each youth who does not complete high school, over his or her lifetime, costs the nation approximately $260,000.4 Unless high schools are able to graduate their students at higher rates, nearly 13 million students will drop out over the next decade. The result will be a loss to the nation of $3 trillion. If the students who dropped out of the Class of 2009 had graduated, the nation’s economy would have benefited from nearly $335 billion in additional income over the course of their lifetimes. (Alliance for Educational Excellence, Issue Brief 2009)

10 Most dropouts follow identifiable pathways through the education pipeline. The categories of educational risk factors: 1) Academic performance: Students who struggle in the classroom and fall behind academically are more likely to drop out. Low grades, low test scores, F’s in English and math, falling behind in course credits, and being held back one or more times all have been linked to lower chances for graduation. 2) Educational engagement: Students who become disengaged from school and develop disciplinary problems are more likely to drop out. High rates of absenteeism or truancy, poor classroom behavior, less participation in extracurricular activities, and bad relationships with teachers and peers all have been linked to lower chances for graduation. Achieve, Inc., Identifying Potential Dropouts: Key Lessons for Building an Early Warning Data System, A Dual Agenda of High Standards and High Graduation Rates, 2006 Why is it Important?

11 Short “Shift Happens” Videos U&feature=related U&feature=related feature=related feature=related &feature=related &feature=related E&feature=related E&feature=related &feature=related &feature=related

12 Vision for All Requires we redefine or reframe success, and Ensures that demography does not equate destiny

13 Changing how we work starts with changing how we think. Think outside the box. © The Forum for Youth Investment. Ready by 21 and the Ready by 21 Logo are registered trademarks of the Forum for Youth Investment.

14 What does it require? Start with Vision planning - begin with the end in mind and work backwards Understand and practice person centered thinking Increase the effective use of diminishing resources

15 What does it require? (Cont.) Develop social skills along with academic skills Begin career discussions early – foster throughout school experience Engage Vocational Evaluators and Career Assessment Professionals

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17 What does it require? (Cont.) Assessment of values, skills, interests Development of transferable skills Help students build self determination: ―Choice-Making ―Decision-Making ―Problem-Solving ―Goal-Setting & Attainment ―Internal Locus of Control ―Positive Attributes of Efficacy and Outcomes Expectancy ―Self-Observation ―Self-Evaluation ―Self-Reinforcement ―Self-Instruction ―Self-Advocacy & Leadership ―Self-Awareness ―Self-Knowledge

18 What does it require? (Cont.) Adoption of Universal Design for Learning Use of Assistive Technology Development of skills required to reach goals – Resilience – Persistence – Problem Solving – Identifying and using resources – Self-evaluation and adjust

19 What does it require? (Cont.) Adoption of Universal Design for Learning Use of Assistive Technology Development of skills required to reach goals – Resilience – Persistence – Problem Solving – Identifying and using resources – Self-evaluation and adjust

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21 What does it require? (Cont.) Integration AND implementation of SCAN skills across ALL areas of learning Ensure competency - teacher prep Provision of professional development

22 Reflections! Questions? Discussion.


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