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Supporting ePortfolios: No Small FEAT Royce Robertson, Ed.D. Plymouth State University.

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Presentation on theme: "Supporting ePortfolios: No Small FEAT Royce Robertson, Ed.D. Plymouth State University."— Presentation transcript:

1 Supporting ePortfolios: No Small FEAT Royce Robertson, Ed.D. Plymouth State University

2 Before we get started... All of these materials can be found at: Dr. Royce Robertson Plymouth State University

3 ePortfolio Defined Peter Seldin (2004) “...a factual description of [an individual’s] strengths and accomplishments...” “thoughtful not exhaustive” “well-rounded picture of [one’s] effectiveness” “broad range of skills, abilities, attitudes, and values”

4 Town History Presentation Geometry Proofs Revolutionary War Paper Reading Pre-Calc Test Running Mapping Project Brit Lit Presentation Family Poetry Assignment Basketball Team Volume vs. Mass Lab Chess Club Officer Theatre Representation of the Graduate Extracurricular Personal Curricular © R. Robertson, Ed.D., 2006 The Three “Faces” of the Student

5 Three Major Concepts to Remember Purpose is paramount FEAT The 4 Ds

6 “Verb” Purposes of a Portfolio Reflect on the growth and change Demonstrate competence against standards Illustrate skills against set of competencies Illustrate growth and change of one (or more) work sample(s) Illustrate best work in specific academic areas Integrate multiple genres of knowledge and skills into one or more work samples Document and plan individual growth in curricular, extracurricular, and personal areas Different purposes may imply different Educational support, including differences in assessment. For example, in a reflective portfolio different qualities are assessed as compared to a competency based portfolio.

7 Supporting ePortfolio: No Small FEAT Robertson, R. (2006) Technical Functional Educational System Conditions Requirements Infrastructure ePortfolio Tool Process Click Paths Curriculum Scope Sequence Purpose © R. Robertson, Ed.D., 2006 Administrative ePortfolio Support Policy Budget Planning

8 Four D Process Templates Y2Y Flow Select Collect Neglect Reflect (based on Paulson, Paulson, and Meyer, 1991) Review Assess Audience Presenting © R. Robertson, Ed.D., 2006

9 Design Templates –The spectrum of control –Forces of control –How many buckets do you have? –Is this tied to educational initiatives? Year to Year Flow –What reviewers and owners do – based on a timeline

10 Four Year Cycle of Review Process for One Student Year 1 Student: Add work from Freshman Seminar Teachers: Review beginning portfolio development Counselor: Initiate 4-year plan Parent: Visit and provide feedback Student: Teacher: Counselor: Parent: Year 2 Student: Teacher: Counselor: Parent: Student: Teacher: Counselor: Parent: Year 3 Student: Teacher: Counselor: Parent: Student: Teacher: Counselor: Parent: Year 4 Student: Teacher: Counselor: Parent: Student: Teacher: Counselor: Parent: With each year, students, teachers, counselors, and parents, as well as others, will perform grade specific tasks that could include personal, curricular, extracurricular, guidance, or other dimensions of the school’s experience.

11 Good Template Design Connects to purpose Minimizes gaps and overlaps Allows for some repetition with differentiation Accommodates various artifacts and file types Balances choice and control Artifacts can be “put into play”

12 What are some pros and cons of this design? HomepageMy BestPaper Creative Writing ResearchSpeaking Science Lab TestArt Personal Items ResumeLetters Four Year Plan TranscriptAwards

13 Develop Definitions –Artifact –Reflection –Description Time intensive White space design – the more the better A to Z file formats

14 Artifact Actual Item Electronically documented (Extra)curricular Description Factual, contextual Objective narrative Who, What, When, Where? Reflection Personal, thoughtful Describes “so what?” and “now what?” How, Why? © R. Robertson, Ed.D., 2006

15 School Goals Acquire Information Think Critically and Solve Problems Communicate Effectively Participate as Active and Responsible Member of Society Artifact 1Artifact 6Artifact 10Artifact 13 Artifact 2Artifact 5Artifact 11Artifact 4 Artifact 3Artifact 7Artifact 5Artifact 14 Artifact 4Artifact 8Artifact 9Artifact 15 Artifact 5Artifact 9Artifact 12Artifact 16 Curricular Extracurricular Personal

16 Display Connection to Technical domain –Pop Ups –Browser compatibility Connection to Functional domain –Permissions –Feedback Connection to Educational domain –What is the student trying to demonstrate –Steak vs. sizzle?

17 Determine Connection to Design –When? –Who? –How? [RLR: show rubric] Connection to Educational –Growth –Accomplishment –Implications of “regrading”?

18 ePortfolio Support: No Small FEAT Complexity of ePortfolio Team members represent different lenses through which they look Balance between domains Lack of balance increases chance of dissonance Design structure for support programs Planning with balance in mind [RLR: show FEAT-CYI]

19 Supporting ePortfolio: No Small FEAT Robertson, R. (2006) Technical Functional Educational System Conditions Requirements Infrastructure ePortfolio Tool Process Click Paths Curriculum Scope Sequence Purpose © R. Robertson, Ed.D., 2006 Administrative ePortfolio Support Policy Budget Planning

20 Functional “Click Paths” Common Question: How do I add a file (reflection, etc)? Different paths for different tools Drastic differences for common vs. custom tools How does functional support (instruction) integrate with ICT curriculum?

21 Educational “Formal Learning” The connection between the core curriculum and the ePortfolio Often represented through a curriculum map Common question: How does the purpose of the ePortfolio reflect the educational program at the school?

22 Content vs. Intent Answers the question: –Why am I using this artifact?

23 Intent vs. Content Deciding How to Use an Artifact Intent Purpose Function Demonstration How the artifact is being used: Collaboration Communication Technology Knowledge of Material Organization of Material Scope and Sequence Content Knowledge Information Ability to arrange information appropriately © R. Robertson, Ed.D., 2006

24 “Verb” Purposes of a Portfolio Reflect on the growth and change Demonstrate competence against standards Illustrate skills against set of competencies Illustrate growth and change of one (or more) work sample(s) Illustrate best work in specific academic areas Integrate multiple genres of knowledge and skills into one or more work samples Document and plan individual growth in curricular, extracurricular, and personal areas Different purposes may imply different Educational support, including differences in assessment. For example, in a reflective portfolio different qualities are assessed as compared to a competency based portfolio.

25 What the research suggests... Resume *^ Certifications*^ Test results^ Transcripts*^ Classroom management plan* Diversity experience Letters of recommendation*^ Influence on student learning^ Philosophy of teaching statement* Teaching style^ Student teaching evaluations*^ Technology skill artifacts* Introduction page*^ * - rated as top priority in study by Snoeyick and Meyer (2007) ^ - rated as top priority in study by Studer and Wexler (2006)

26 Cycling through Artifacts, Standards, and Reflections Questions for Reflection: What is context for the artifact? What qualities of the artifact demonstrate achievement of the standard? How has this artifact influenced your growing as an educator? 1 Choose the Artifact 2 Choose the Standard 3 Reflect on the Artifact and the Standard Question to consider: What are the details of the standard? Is the standard about “teacher work” or “student work”? What artifacts would naturally support the standard? Questions to consider: What form does the artifact take? Is the artifact “student work” or “teacher work”? Is the artifact your best work or a baseline for growth? © R. Robertson, Ed.D., 2006

27 What This Means in iWebfolio Steps: In Contents, click on Standard category Click on Add Reflection; type or Copy and Paste the Reflection Click Save 2 Choose the Artifact 1 Choose the Standard 3 Reflect on the Artifact and the Standard Steps: In Contents, click on the Standard “category” Use the Introduction page as a way of setting context for multiple artifacts Click on Edit to change; Save&Return to complete Use View Portfolio to see results Steps: In Contents, click on Standard category Click on Add Attachment; Choose File; Add New File Browse, Save, and Attach © R. Robertson, Ed.D., 2006

28 Administrative The Four Ps: –Policy (contracts) –Planning (goals of the implementation) –People (staffing) –Purchasing (budgets, vendors) Top down or bottom up? Encouraging practice or blanket mandate?

29 Technical “Back end” – different from Functional Naively associated with “choosing a tool” System requirements Maintenance In-house vs. outsource?

30 Connection to Educational Media Specialists The L/MC is the hub of the school –Technology support to collect and integrate information which plays out as high quality assessments in the portfolio L/MS also support the goals of the school –This is not just a “technology thing”

31 Institutional Assessment Harvesting Reports [RLR: show one] Accreditation Electronic Exhibit Rooms

32 Alignment of Core Components of the Electronic Portfolio Department A Program 1 Program 2 Standard 1A Standard 1B Standard 1C Standard 1D Course 1 Course 2 Course 3 Artifact A Production B Artifact C Artifact F Production E Artifact D Artifact G Reflect and Document Standard 2A Standard 2B Standard 2C Standard 2D Course 1 Course 2 Course 3 Artifact A Artifact B Production C Prodcution F Artifact E Artifact D Artifact G Reflect and Document Report and Share Chair Program Coordinators (PC) Faculty and Advisors Student Faculty Advisor PC Student PC Extracurriculars © R. Robertson, Ed.D., 2006

33 Questions? All of these materials can be found at: Dr. Royce Robertson Plymouth State University

34 General Ideas Inconsistencies –Each school has its own process –Technological skill of hiring committee Consistencies –Acceptable artifacts –Finalists get more attention Research –Generally qualitative –Inconclusive but informative Personal Approach –Don’t worry about others; manage your own image –Take opinions with a grain of salt –Integrate the invite with a good cover letter or follow up message

35 What the research says... Themes –Candidate reflections –Accomplishment of standards –Stakeholder (including employers) perception Inconsistency –Who looks at it how often –Importance in hiring –Quality and quantity of artifacts

36 What should you do? Reorganize for audience, purpose, and the search Introduce yourself with a unique, professional message Remove all errors Focus the artifacts on planning, management, and impact on students Integrate the link or the invitation into a cover letter or resume Use real pictures when possible not clip art or stock photos Choose artifacts that show breadth of content areas Attempt short, targeted video to show your skills in action (3- 5 minutes) Include student work as part of a cycle of learning Reflect in order to embellish on preparation, provisioning, and student response Be aware that the portfolio is often used at the end of the process not the beginning

37 Introductions Narrative Written like a letter Cover letter qualities Introduce self Provide direction Pictures Quotes Demographic data Succinct List of personal data –Name –Major –GPA –Advisor –Objective –Etc. Pictures Quotes Or, a combination of the two?


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