Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Faculty Academic Advising: Affirming the Role of Faculty Advisors Dr. Wes Habley Tom Brown.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Faculty Academic Advising: Affirming the Role of Faculty Advisors Dr. Wes Habley Tom Brown."— Presentation transcript:

1 Faculty Academic Advising: Affirming the Role of Faculty Advisors Dr. Wes Habley Tom Brown

2 “If a boy has enough intelligence he should consider studying for the ministry, unless when he goes to the university he is given to carousing, drinking, and wenching, in which case he ought to consider law.” J. Collyer 1761

3 Topics for Today’s Webinar Key events in faculty advising Factors that shape faculty role in advising Potential of faculty advising What do faculty say about advising? What do students say about faculty advising? Importance of an advising mission statement Organizational models for advising

4 Key Events in Faculty Advising Morrill Act establishes land grant colleges Johns Hopkins establishes first formal system of faculty advisors Harvard initiates program of faculty advisors for freshmen Johns Hopkins University President appoints first "chief of faculty advisors ” (continued)

5 University of Illinois appoints first Dean of Men to handle disciplinary duties, extra-curricular activities, and to resolve academic problems Harvard and Johns Hopkins report the use of counselors to supplement the work of faculty advisors 1950s - dramatic influx of students due to the GI Bill 1960s – Civil rights movements brings increasing numbers of historically under-represented minority, women, and low SES students to college 1979 – National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) chartered Key Events in Faculty Advising (cont.)

6 Factors Which Shaped Faculty Role in Advising Diversity of institutional types Diversity of students Evolution of the curriculum Changing expectations for faculty performance

7 Potential of Faculty Advising Frequent faculty-student contact in and out of the classroom is the most important factor in student motivation and involvement. (Chickering and Gamson) Frequent interaction with faculty related more strongly to satisfaction than any other type of involvement or characteristic of the student or the institution. (Astin) Students who leave college are less likely to have had quality interaction with faculty. (Flannelly and Sanford) Quality interaction with faculty the single strongest predictor of success for at-risk minority students (Levin & Levin) (continued)

8 Potential of Faculty Advising (cont.) Academic advising is the only structured activity on the campus where every student has the opportunity to develop an on-going, one-to-one relationship with a concerned representative of the institution. (Habley) Academic advising involves intellectual matters, the most important area of concern raised by students. (Frost ) The quality of academic advising is the single most powerful predictor of satisfaction with the campus environment. (Kuh)

9 Potential of Faculty Advising (cont.) Good advising may be the single most underestimated characteristic of a successful college experience (Light) Advising, rather than an extension of the educator’s role is integral to it. It is teaching which stretches beyond instruction (Berdahl) For community college students, frequent interaction with faculty and advisers outside of class had a positive impact on preventing students from dropping out. (Regina Deil Amen)

10 Research has shown that advising improves student retention rates through the establishment of relationships with faculty or staff members who help students to clarify their academic and career goals. Noel Levitz 2006

11 There is a relationship between advising and retention. (n=1594) Agree/strongly agree86% Disagree 4% Brown Survey, Faculty see a relationship between advising and retention

12 Why do students leave college? Isolation Inability to connect with significant members of the campus community….

13 The more interaction students have with faculty and staff, the more likely they are to learn effectively and persist toward achievement of their educational goals. Community College Survey of Student Engagement

14 Why do students leave college? Incongruence What I experienced is not what I expected.

15 Academic advisors can mediate the gap between student experiences and their expectations. Habley

16 Community college students frequently described occasions when they considered dropping out of college. Asked why they persisted they typically referred to a strong early connection to someone at the college. Very often they even offered that person’s name. Kay McClenney, 2011

17 Most faculty report having had little or no training or other preparation prior to beginning their work in advising…. What do Faculty say about advising?

18 Faculty members are left to sink or swim when it comes to effective student advising—they are blamed for something they lack the professional training to do. Dr. Yolanda Moses, President, AAHE Faculty Advising Examined, 2003

19 When I first began to advise, I had adequate preparation and training. (n=1570) Strongly agree/agree30% Disagree/strongly disagree 53% Brown Survey,

20 The majority of institutions do not require advisor development programs. Those that do, offer programs at the beginning of the Fall term for one day or less. Sixth National Survey on Academic Advising

21 Some insights into faculty perceptions of advising and their advisees

22 There is a relationship between advising and retention. (n=1594) Agree/strongly agree86% Disagree 4% Brown Survey,

23 Relationship between advising and retention? More faculty members need to know this…. Brown Survey,

24 Even if there are no conventional rewards for conscientious performance, faculty members can be motivated if the issues are significant, and they can feel they are making a contribution. Universities in the Marketplace, Derek Bok, 2003

25 Making the Most of College Good advising may be the single most underestimated characteristic of a successful college experience. Richard Light, 2001

26 Integration of Learning Do Students recognize the value of general education requirements? (n=1555) Strongly agree/agree21% Disagree/strongly disagree52% Brown Survey,

27 Making the Most of College The faculty members students identify as having had a powerful influence on their thinking and on their lives are those who helped them make connections between the curriculum and their personal lives, values, and experiences. Richard Light, Making the Most of College, 2001

28 Students usually have a realistic understanding about the demands of academic work and what is required to be successful in their classes. (n = 1587) Strongly agree/agree13% Disagree/strongly disagree69% Brown Survey,

29 Students usually have a realistic understanding of careers and how to prepare for them. (n=1574) Agree/strongly agree58% Disagree17% Brown Survey,

30 Advising is more meaningful when treated as a teaching process rather than a product. Susan Frost, Academic Advising for Student Success: System of Shared Responsibility

31 Teaching and advising need to be part of a seamless process, sharing the same intellectual sphere, informed by a relatively consistent educational philosophy. Robert M. Berdahl, Historian and President University of California, Berkeley Teaching Through Academic Advising: A Faculty Perspective, 1995

32 What do students say about advising? Next to the quality of instruction, academic advising is consistently the next most important area of the college experience to students. National Student Satisfaction Report Noel Levitz 2006

33 What do students say? National Student Satisfaction and Priorities Report 2011 >600,00 students 819 two- and four-year institutions Noel-Levitz

34 Career & Private Institutions 2011 (Noel-Levitz) Instructional effectiveness (6.29) Concern for the individual (6.25) Academic advising (6.24) Admissions and financial aid (6.24) Student centeredness (6.23) Campus climate (6.21) Registration effectiveness (6.18) Service Excellence (6.12) Academic Services (6.05) Safety & Security (6.02)

35 Community College Student Priorities 2011 (Noel-Levitz) Instructional effectiveness6.21 Registration effectiveness6.19 Academic Advising/Counseling6.17 Concern for the individual 6.11 Academic services6.08 Admissions and financial aid6.08 Safety and security6.05 Student centeredness6.01 Campus climate6.01 Service excellence5.99 Campus Support Services5.50

36 Four-year Private Institutions 2011 (Noel-Levitz) Instructional effectiveness (6.36) Academic advising (6.33) Student centeredness (6.21) Recruitment and financial aid (6.21) Registration effectiveness (6.20) Safety and security (6.19) Concern for the individual (6.18) Campus climate (6.18) Campus support services (6.06)

37 Four-year Public Institutions 2011 (Noel-Levitz) Academic advising (6.38) Instructional effectiveness (6.37) Safety and security (6.32) Registration effectiveness (6.25) Recruitment and financial aid (6.21) Concern for the individual (6.17) Campus climate (6.16) Student centeredness (6.14) Campus support services (6.10)

38 What do students say about faculty advising? 1.Sample based on 44,867 students from 70 colleges in 32 states that administered the survey between August 1, 2005 and July 31, 2010.User norms--not representative norms 3.1,769 records were deleted to guarantee that no single institution would be overrepresented 4.Surveys were administered in different ways, to different groups of students 5.Faculty advisors represented an N of 25,937

39 Advising Needs (18 items) Have not discussed, and do not need to Have not discussed, but should have Have discussed Satisfied with Advisor's Assistance –Very Satisfied (5) –Satisfied (4) –Neutral (3) –Dissatisfied (2) –Very Dissatisfied (1) Part A: Part B: (completed by those who checked "have discussed" in Part A)

40 Have not discussed, no need Items where the highest percentage of students selected this response were: –Withdrawing/Transferring (68.2%) –Dealing with personal problems (67.1%) –Obtaining employment on campus (63.1%) –Obtaining remedial/tutorial assistance (61.9%) And lowest percentage of students : –Scheduling/Registration procedures (8.8%) –Meeting graduation requirements (17.9%) –Dropping/Adding courses (30.5%)

41 Have not discussed, but should have: Items where the highest percentage of students selected this response were: Finding a job after college/job placement (30.9%) Continuing my education after graduation (25.1%) Identifying career areas which fit my skills, abilities, and interests (24.5%) Matching my learning style to courses and instructors (23.0%) Obtaining course credit through non-traditional means (20.6%) Clarifying my life/career goals (19.5%)

42 Have discussed: Items where the lowest percentage of students selected this response were: Withdrawing/transferring from this institution (14.6%) Obtaining employment on campus (15.0%) Obtaining remedial/tutorial assistance (18.6%) Dealing with personal problems (18.1%) Finding a job after college/job placement (19.2%)

43 Have discussed: Items where the highest percentage of students selected this response were: Scheduling/registration procedures (75.6%) My academic progress (61.8%) Meeting requirements for graduation, student teaching, certification, etc. (56.3%) Dropping/adding courses (53.8%)

44 Student Ratings on Topics Discussed with Faculty Advisors Mean ratings for all 18 needs were at or above 4.0 (satisfactory) Mean for all 18 items was 4.18 Highest Levels of satisfaction: –Dealing with personal problems (4.33) –Identifying career areas (4.26) –Matching learning style to courses (4.25) –Clarifying my life/career goals (4.23)

45 Impressions of Your Advisor (36 items) Advisors traits and characteristics Rating scale: –Strongly agree (5) –Agree (4) –Neutral (3) –Disagree (2) –Strongly disagree (1)

46 Items with the lowest mean agreement ratings were: Takes the initiative in arranging meetings with me (3.44) Encourages my involvement in extracurricular activities (3.52) Encourages me to talk about myself and my college experiences (3.58) Helps me explore careers in my field of interest (3.60) Anticipates my needs (3.68)

47 Items with the highest mean agreement ratings were: Respects my right to make my own decisions (4.23) Keeps personal information confidential (4.22) Is a good listener (4.18) Is approachable and easy to talk to (4.17) Has a sense of humor (4.16) Respects my opinions and feelings (4.15) Provides a caring and open atmosphere (4.11)

48 Summary of Student Opinions of Faculty Advisors 1.Faculty advisors would do well in focusing on those advising needs with the highest percentages of students responding "have not discussed, but should have." 2.Faculty advisors are satisfactorily meeting student needs. 3.Students have favorable impressions of the traits and characteristics of their faculty advisors.

49 IF practices which support faculty advising are far from exemplary, YET student satisfaction with and impressions of their faculty advisors are moderately favorable, THEN what impact would faculty advising have on students and institutions if practices were enhanced?

50 Recommendations for Faculty Advisors Develop strategies which: Increase student contact with faculty advisors Involve more faculty advisors in comprehensive training Assess the effectiveness of faculty advisors Reward exemplary performance by faculty advisors (continued)

51 Encourage faculty advisors to: Recommendations for Faculty Advisors (cont.) Become more active in outreach to students Become better at anticipating student issues and concerns Seek ways to personalize the advising relationship with each advisee Help students connect with all facets of the campus community Help students explore the external contexts related to their college experiences

52 IMPORTANCE OF A MISSION STATEMENT

53 What is a mission statement? A mission statement describes…. – Our reason for being – Who we serve – What we hope to achieve

54 Why do we need a mission statement? A mission statement guides the decisions we make about what we do and how we accomplish what we do

55 MISSION STATEMENT

56 GOALS/OUTCOMES

57 MISSION STATEMENT GOALS/OUTCOMES Advising Program Strategies and Criteria

58 MISSION STATEMENT GOALS/OUTCOMES Advising Program Strategies and Criteria Organization

59 MISSION STATEMENT GOALS/OUTCOMES Advising Program Strategies and Criteria OrganizationDelivery Roles/ Responsibilities

60 MISSION STATEMENT GOALS/OUTCOMES Advising Program Strategies and Criteria OrganizationDelivery Roles/ Responsibilities Training and Tools

61 MISSION STATEMENT GOALS/OUTCOMES Advising Program Strategies and Criteria OrganizationDelivery Roles/ Responsibilities Training and Tools Program and Advisor Assessment

62 MISSION STATEMENT GOALS/OUTCOMES Advising Program Strategies and Criteria OrganizationDelivery Roles/ Responsibilities Training and Tools Program and Advisor Assessment

63 Mission Considerations The advising mission statement must be consistent with the institutional mission statement (vision, strategic plan). –What does the institutional mission statement say about students? –How can our advising program contribute to the realization of this mission?

64 Mission Considerations Development of the advising mission statement must include a wide variety of constituents. –Those who deliver advising –Those who receive advising –The who support the delivery of advising

65 Mission Considerations Assessment is critical to the realization of the mission CAS Standards state that the mission statement –must include student learning –must be prominently displayed and promoted –must be regularly reviewed and, if necessary, revised

66 ORGANIZATIONAL MODELS FOR FACULTY ENGAGEMENT

67 Faculty Only Model Faculty Student

68 Supplementary Model Faculty Student Advising Office

69 Split Model Advising Office Academic Sub-unit Student AStudent B Academic Sub-unit

70 Dual Model Faculty Student Advising Office

71 Total Intake Model Advising Office Student Academic Sub-unit

72 Satellite Model Academic Sub-unit Advising Office Student AStudent B Academic Sub-unit Advising Office

73 Self-contained Model Advising Office Student AStudent B

74 The Big Three…. Training, Evaluation, Reward It is impossible to do a job well if… –no one sets expectations or provides you with tools or resources to do the job –you receive no feedback on your effectiveness –you receive no recognition or reward for exemplary work

75 Many key competencies are developed after educators arrive on campus. Therefore, colleges must assume the responsibility for teaching and developing their own educators to enhance student learning inside and outside the classroom by providing professional development programs. Brown and Ward, 2007

76 What’s needed is a different way of thinking about professional development— not as special occasions offered on a periodic basis but as an integral part of institutional work. Carnegie Foundation, 2008

77 Topics for Today’s Webinar Key events in faculty advising Factors that shape faculty role in advising Potential of faculty advising What do faculty say about advising? What do students say about faculty advising? Importance of an advising mission statement Organizational models for advising

78 Thank You!


Download ppt "Faculty Academic Advising: Affirming the Role of Faculty Advisors Dr. Wes Habley Tom Brown."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google