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1 Fit Bodies, Fit Brains! How exercise and brain research impact learning. Arizona Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance AzAHPERD.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Fit Bodies, Fit Brains! How exercise and brain research impact learning. Arizona Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance AzAHPERD."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Fit Bodies, Fit Brains! How exercise and brain research impact learning. Arizona Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance AzAHPERD President Leslie Hicks hicks@azahperd.org www.azahperd.org

2 2 Movement & the Brain 2

3 3 Physical Fitness & Academics 3 Journal of Exercise Physiology online (JEP online ) Volume 8 Number 1 February 2005 Pediatric Exercise Physiology PHYSICAL FITNESS AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT JAMES B GRISSOM. Official Research Journal of The American Society of Exercise Physiologists (ASEP) ISSN 1097-9751

4 4 Physical Fitness & Academics 4

5 55 The Association Between School-Based Physical Activity, Including Physical Education, and Academic Performance The Association Between School-Based Physical Activity, Including Physical Education, and Academic Performance U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Division of Adolescent and School Health www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth April 2010 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The association between school- based physical activity, including physical education, and academic performance. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2010.

6 66 1.School-Based Physical Education Studies 2.Recess Studies 3.Classroom Physical Activity Studies 4.Extracurricular Physical Activity Studies The Association Between School-Based Physical Activity, Including Physical Education, and Academic Performance Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The association between school- based physical activity, including physical education, and academic performance. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2010.

7 77 School-based physical education: To maximize the potential benefits of student participation in physical education class, schools and physical education teachers can consider increasing the amount of time students spend in physical education or adding components to increase the quality of physical education class. Articles in the review examined increased physical education time (achieved by increasing the number of days physical education was provided each week or lengthening class time) and/or improved quality of physical education (achieved through strategies such as using trained instructors and increasing the amount of active time during physical education class). I MPLICATIONS FOR S CHOOLS The results of this review support several strategies that schools can use to help students meet national physical activity recommendations without detracting from academic performance: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The association between school- based physical activity, including physical education, and academic performance. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2010.

8 88 Recess: School boards, superintendents, principals, and teachers can feel confident that providing recess to students on a regular basis may benefit academic behaviors, while also facilitating social development and contributing to overall physical activity and its associated health benefits. There was no evidence that time spent in recess had a negative association with cognitive skills, attitudes, or academic behavior. I MPLICATIONS FOR S CHOOLS The results of this review support several strategies that schools can use to help students meet national physical activity recommendations without detracting from academic performance: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The association between school- based physical activity, including physical education, and academic performance. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2010.

9 99 Classroom-based physical activity: Classroom teachers can incorporate movement activities and physical activity breaks into the classroom setting that may improve student performance and the classroom environment. Most interventions reviewed here used short breaks (5–20 minutes) that required little or no teacher preparation, special equipment or resources. I MPLICATIONS FOR S CHOOLS The results of this review support several strategies that schools can use to help students meet national physical activity recommendations without detracting from academic performance: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The association between school- based physical activity, including physical education, and academic performance. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2010.

10 10 Extracurricular physical activities: The evidence suggests that superintendents, principals, and athletic directors can develop or continue school-based sports programs without concern that these activities have a detrimental impact on students’ academic performance. School administrators and teachers also can encourage after-school organizations, clubs, student groups, and parent groups to incorporate physical activities into their programs and events. I MPLICATIONS FOR S CHOOLS The results of this review support several strategies that schools can use to help students meet national physical activity recommendations without detracting from academic performance: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The association between school- based physical activity, including physical education, and academic performance. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2010.

11 11 Our students should have a kinesthetic brain break every 25-30 minutes. Our students should have a kinesthetic brain break every 25-30 minutes.

12 12 SPARK John J. Ratey, MD The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain From the Beginning

13 13 SPARK The real reason we feel so good when we get our blood pumping is that it makes the brain function at its best, and in my view, this benefit of physical activity is far more important – and fascinating – than what it does for the body. The point of exercise is to build and condition the brain. Building muscles and conditioning the heart and lungs are essentially side effects.

14 14 SPARK Exercise has a profound impact on cognitive abilities and mental health. Research shows that physical activity sparks biological changes that encourage brain cells to bind to one another. Exercise provides an unparalleled stimulus, creating an environment in which the brain is ready, willing, and able to learn. ◦heightened awareness, awake, better mood

15 15 SPARK ACTUAL GROWTH OF NERVE WITH PRACTICEPlasticity of the brain, a fact. Teachers are what I call: Plasticity Guides

16 16 SPARK Exercise influences learning directly, at the cellular level, improving the brain’s potential to log in and process new information. After you finish exercising blood flow almost immediately shifts back to the prefrontal cortex, and this is the perfect time to focus on a project that demands sharp thinking and complex analysis.

17 17 SPARK

18 Recess Policy Legislation from 2010 session requires local school boards to consider recess policy at a scheduled meeting.

19 New statutory language: 15-108. Recess policies A. No later than January 1, 2011, each school district governing board and the governing body of each charter school shall conduct a public meeting to consider the adoption of a policy to provide at least thirty total minutes of recess each day for pupils in kindergarten programs and grades one through five. Each parent or guardian of a child who is enrolled in the school district or charter school, as applicable, shall be provided notice of any public meeting called pursuant to this subsection and shall be provided an opportunity at the public meeting to comment on the proposed policy. After receiving public comment, the school district governing board or the governing body of the charter school shall discuss and vote on the adoption of the proposed recess policy. B. If a recess policy is adopted pursuant to subsection A: 1. The recess requirements shall consist of structured physical activity outside or inside the classroom. 2. Physical education classes may be used to satisfy the recess requirement. 3. Unstructured recess time that occurs immediately after lunch periods does not satisfy the recess requirement. C. School districts and charter schools that do not provide instruction to pupils in kindergarten programs or grades one through five are not required to conduct a public meeting pursuant to subsection A.

20 20 Structured Recess Structured recess is designed to promote an active and safe environment for all students to participate in during the designated recess time. This includes having proper space and adequate amounts of developmentally appropriate equipment per student, and activities available for students of all ability levels. Possible Activities: Create an Implementation Plan, Recess Before Lunch Programs, Structured Recess Zones, and Classroom Activity Breaks. Arizona Department of Education September 1, 2010

21 Why recess? Recess provides children with discretionary time and opportunities to engage in physical activity that helps to develop healthy bodies and enjoyment of movement. It also allows elementary children to practice life skills such as conflict resolution, cooperation, respect for rules, taking turns, sharing, using language to communicate, and problem solving in situations that are real. Furthermore, it may facilitate improved attention and focus on learning in the academic program. (Council on Physical Education for Children, 2001)

22 Health aspects of exercise WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. schools and childcare programs could be required to include daily exercise as part of the new National Physical Activity Plan released on Monday. With two-thirds of adult Americans and a third of children overweight or obese, the need for more activity is dire, health experts said in launching the plan. The plan calls for changes in medical school curricula, local regulations to encourage construction of sidewalks, playgrounds and parks, guidelines for doctors on counseling patients, and a return of organized exercise to school days. The report acknowledged what it said was pressure on schools to improve academic standards. "These pressures, combined with the trend toward children being driven to school and other factors, have reduced the amount of time children and adolescents are physically active during the school day."

23 Studies Studies A study published in the journal Pediatrics studied the links between recess and classroom behavior among about 11,000 children age 8 and 9. Those who had more than 15 minutes of recess a day showed better behavior in class than those who had little or none.study Harvard researchers reported in The Journal of School Health that the more physical fitness tests children passed, the better they did on academic tests. The study, of 1,800 middle school students, suggests that children can benefit academically from physical activity during gym class and recess.physical activity

24 NASBE policy NASBE policy RECESS IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. Recess provides opportunities for physical activity, which helps students stay alert and attentive in class and provides other educational and social benefits. School authorities shall encourage and develop schedules that provide time within every school day for preschool, kindergarten, and elementary school students to enjoy supervised recess. Every school shall have playgrounds, other facilities, and equipment available for free play


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