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Energy Efficiency Education Combustion Safety Testing 1.

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Presentation on theme: "Energy Efficiency Education Combustion Safety Testing 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 Energy Efficiency Education Combustion Safety Testing 1

2 Energy Efficiency Education Your Instructor… Brian Kumer Thermal Imaging Services, Inc E. Brookview Lane Peoria, IL Cell: Office: or 2

3 Energy Efficiency Education Building Science Hot Line Illinois Home Performance Building Science HOT LINE ext. 3 Free to homeowners, renters, contractors, anyone looking for unbiased advice on specific home performance issues and improvements! To learn more go to: 3

4 Energy Efficiency Education

5 Energy Efficiency Education Todays Conversation… BPI’s new standards what that means to you Major changes related to combustion safety When will they become finalized (who knows) Equipment needed for testing Air-Free vs As-Measured CO readings Sources of carbon monoxide CAZ testing procedure Measuring ventilation through baht fans Measured CO limit changes CO exposure limits 5

6 Energy Efficiency Education My Website… or 6

7 Energy Efficiency Education Largest Manometer in the World! 7

8 Energy Efficiency Education Largest Manometer in the World! 8 24” wide x 44” tall Touch screen DG700 manometer Coming to a theater near you!

9 Energy Efficiency Education COSA Carbon Monoxide Safety Assoc. – Not for profit providing CO: Education, Training & Certification GAMA Gas Appliance Manufactures Assoc. NFPA Nation Fire Protection Assoc. – Developed the NFPA 54 National Fuel Gas Code Useful Links 9

10 Energy Efficiency Education Parking Lot Topics Questions you may have about: 1.Problem homes 2.Testing procedures 3.Interpreting results 4.Test equipment 5.Remediating problems 6.Anything, really anything… 10

11 Energy Efficiency Education Future Training Topics 1.Thermography (IR) 2.Duct pressure testing 3.Ventilation 4.Multi-family Blower Door testing 5.Whole House Air Leakage Control Installer 6.Your thoughts????? 11

12 Energy Efficiency Education Changes to the BPI Standards No CAZ depressurization limits No draft measurement No smoking the doors No testing failed spillage under natural conditions No checking the air filter during CAZ Not required to measure CO on both sides of turbulator 12

13 Energy Efficiency Education Effects of Carbon Monoxide in Our Lives 13

14 Energy Efficiency Education What Causes Carbon Monoxide? CO is produced by: Insufficient or excess combustion air (oxygen) Insufficient or excess fuel Flame impingement **When any part of the flame is reduced below 1,128 º F, CO will be produced. 14

15 Energy Efficiency Education Bob Dwyer – Co-Founder of COSA 15 Bob Dwyer Bob Dwyer - former Director of training for the Carbon Monoxide Safety Association, and also Bacharach Inc., a manufacturer of environmental test instruments for 13 years. Author of “Carbon Monoxide, A Clear and Present Danger”

16 Energy Efficiency Education Carbon Monoxide Sources.. 16 There have been carbon monoxide sources and carbon monoxide poisonings dating back to times when people lived in caves. Carbon monoxide is formed by the incomplete combustion of materials containing carbon and can be produced by virtually anything that burns. The more efficient the combustion process, the less carbon monoxide is produced.

17 Energy Efficiency Education Cold Weather Carbon Monoxide Levels 17 The largest numbers of poisonings occur in winter when fireplaces, furnaces and boilers are being used to keep buildings warm. Vehicles are also left idling more during winter. This creates circumstances that can easily cause carbon monoxide levels to rise within a vehicle and the surrounding area (such as a garage).

18 Energy Efficiency Education Power Outages 18 Power outages increase the risk of rising carbon monoxide levels. Power outages and natural disasters greatly increase the carbon monoxide risk as people are placed in unfamiliar circumstances using unfamiliar equipment.

19 Energy Efficiency Education McDonalds Drive Thru ppm 19

20 Energy Efficiency Education 20 After getting his Bronco stuck late one night, Shane and three of his friends die of CO poisoning when the exhaust became blocked with mud

21 Energy Efficiency Education Teak Surfing is be Deadly! 21 Surfers hold onto the teak platform to perform there surfing moves behind the moving boat with no life jacket. When they are overcome by CO they let go and sink into the water. Teak surfing has been outlawed in several states.

22 Energy Efficiency Education Ventless Water Heater???? 22 Do you realize there is no difference between operating this gas water heater with no vent and operating a gas cook stove? Stop Everything! Disable water heater before leaving the house!

23 Energy Efficiency Education 3 Sources of Carbon Monoxide 1.Automobile exhaust66% 2.Faulty heating appliances33% 3.Fire – burning wood, smoking 1% I would assume that the automobile exhaust incidences would increase due to Power-vented replacement furnaces less likely to cause CO poisoning Source: Illinois Department of Public Health 23

24 Energy Efficiency Education The most vulnerable have the greatest risk of CO poisoning and they are… 1.People with existing health problems such as heart and lung disease 2.Elderly 3.Infants 4.Children and pregnant women 5.Smokers 6.Small animals Greatest Risk of CO Poisoning? 24

25 Energy Efficiency Education Health Affects of CO Poisoning When carbon monoxide is inhaled into the lungs and bonds with hemoglobin in blood, which forms Carboxyhemoglobin (COHb). This condition displaces oxygen in the blood stream and affects all major organs and muscles. Carbon monoxide molecules bond with hemoglobin in blood over 200 times more easily than oxygen molecules. Suffocation occurs from the inside out. 25

26 Energy Efficiency Education Symptoms of CO Poisoning 200 ppmSlight headaches, tiredness, dizziness, and nausea after 2-3 hours 400 ppmFrontal headaches within 1-2 hours, life threatening after 3 hours 800 ppmDizziness, nausea and convulsion with 45 minutes. 800 ppmUnconsciousness within 2 hours. Death with 2-3 hours 1,600 ppm Headache, dizziness and nausea within 20 minutes. Death within 1 hour 3,200 ppm Headache, dizziness and nausea within 5-10 minutes. Death within 30 min. 6,400 ppm Headache, dizziness and nausea within 5-10 minutes. Death within min. 26

27 Energy Efficiency Education UL 2034 CO Detector Alarm Levels Detector must ignore CO levels of 30 ppm or less for at least 30 days 70 ppm Unit must sound alarm within minutes. 150 ppm Unit must sound alarm within minutes. 400 ppm Unit must sound alarm within 4-15 minutes. 27

28 Energy Efficiency Education CO Detector Comparison Test 28

29 Energy Efficiency Education UL-2034 vs CO Experts 29

30 Energy Efficiency Education Killer Water Heater… 1,200 ppm + tested before dilution with 100% spillage! 30 Notice the rust on the side of the di-electric fittings from the constant back-drafting

31 Energy Efficiency Education Combustion Basics & Measuring CO ( As Measured & Air-Free ) 31

32 Energy Efficiency Education Combustion Appliance Zone CAZ CAZ is the air space surrounding your natural draft or induced draft heating appliances CAZ pressure testing lets us know what conditions the drafting equipment has to work in 32

33 Energy Efficiency Education 33 A natural draft furnace requires 15 cubic/ft of dilution air for every cubic foot of natural gas it uses. 1 cubic foot (cf) = 1,027 Btu 100 cubic feet (1 cf) = 1 therm (approximate) The operation of a 100k furnace for one hour is the equivalent of operating one 50cfm bath fan operating for one hour Natural Draft Furnace

34 Energy Efficiency Education Air + Fuel + Ignition = Heat HEAT IGNITION FUEL AIR The Three T’s of Combustion 1.Time 2.Temperature 3.Turbulence 34

35 Energy Efficiency Education Our Atmosphere Our atmosphere is made of: 79% Nitrogen 20.9% Oxygen Nitrogen is an inert gas that will not react in the combustion process. 35

36 Energy Efficiency Education What is Perfect Combustion? For perfect combustion all 20.9% of the oxygen was completely used up during the combustion process and 0% of oxygen will be measured in the spent flue gases in the vent. That would be considered perfect combustion. A typical water heater or furnace would measure 6 to 8% oxygen. 36

37 Energy Efficiency Education Excess Air Excess air is the amount of air (specifically oxygen) in the combustion gases in excess of the exact amount needed for perfect combustion. When combustion is perfect, just the right amounts of fuel and oxygen are supplied to the combustion process so that all the oxygen is utilized - no oxygen remains in the combustion gases. 37

38 Energy Efficiency Education “As Measured” vs “Air Free” There are two scales with which to measure CO: one is “As-Measured” and the other is “Air-Free.” As-Measured is the method used by most technicians today. The CO is measured from a sample of combustion gases with no regard for the amount of excess air diluting the CO concentrations. 38

39 Energy Efficiency Education “As Measured” vs “Air Free” The basic problem with the as-measured method is this: As the amount of excess air increases, the as-measured CO value falls for a given source strength of CO. In other words, the amount of excess air in the sample can significantly influence the as-measured value. This can cause a technician to mistakenly think that a hazardous burner is working properly. - Rick Karg 39

40 Energy Efficiency Education “As Measured” vs “Air Free” “As-Measured” – is a CO measurement made in a situation where there is no control of the combustion air entering the combustion chamber of an appliance. You could think of it as measuring the CO from an open flame on stovetop. You are measuring diluted flue gases. The flue gases would then contain large quantities of oxygen (above approx. 15%). An example would be measuring the CO in an oven or the stovetop burners. As Measured CO is always lower than Air Free CO measurements. 40

41 Energy Efficiency Education “As Measured” vs “Air Free” This technician is measuring the CO approx. 15” above the burner in diluted flue gases. This is considered an “As-Measured” CO measurement. 41

42 Energy Efficiency Education “As-Measured” vs “Air-Free” Air-free measurement of CO takes account of the amount of excess air by incorporating an adjustment to the as-measured ppm value, thus simulating air-free (oxygen-free) conditions in the combustion gases. To do this, a reading of oxygen (O 2 ) percentage is taken from the combustion gases along with the as- measured CO reading. 42

43 Energy Efficiency Education “As Measured” vs “Air Free” “Air Free” – is a CO measurement in the vent of a heating appliance where the volume of air entering the combustion chamber is somewhat controlled. These flue gases would typically contain oxygen levels between 4% and 10%. 43

44 Energy Efficiency Education “As Measured” vs “Air Free” If air-free CO is determined with a single meter, the meter will have an integral electronic chip that will calculate the air-free level from as-measured CO ppm and O 2 percentage. 44

45 Energy Efficiency Education Calculating Air-Free CO CO AFppm = ( ) x CO ppm – O 2 CO AFppm = Carbon monoxide, air-free CO ppm = As-measured combustion gas carbon monoxide ppm O 2 = % of oxygen in combustion gas, as a percentage CO = % of carbon monoxide in combustion gas, as a percentage 20.9 – 8% (O 2 ) = 12.9 (20.9 ÷ 12.9) x 23 (CO) = 37 ppm air-free

46 Energy Efficiency Education “As Measured” vs “Air Free” 46 This technician is measuring the CO in undiluted flue gases of this water heater. This is an “Air-Free” CO measurement. The instrument you will be using does have the Air-Free option. No math required!

47 Energy Efficiency Education BPI CO Thresholds Page

48 Energy Efficiency Education Venting Gas Appliances 48

49 Energy Efficiency Education Venting Gas Appliances Venting spent fuel gases to the outside of the home from combustion appliances can be done one of three ways: 1.Masonry chimney 2.B-vent (metal double wall pipe) 3.PVC pipe – high efficiency equipment only! 49

50 Energy Efficiency Education Masonry Chimney A masonry chimney may be constructed out soft brick and it may have a clay tile liner on the inside connecting the heating appliance to outside. Chimneys most times are oversized and take a long time to warm up and promote draft. Installation of a a flue liner will correct this problem. 50

51 Energy Efficiency Education B-Vent Flue “B-vent” is a double wall vent pipe that is routed from the heating appliance or vent connector through the roof to the outside. Commonly referred to as a “flue” 51

52 Energy Efficiency Education Vent Connector to Chimney The vent connector is a single wall metal pipe connecting the heating appliance to the masonry chimney. The vent connector must have a minimum of ¼” rise per foot! 52

53 Energy Efficiency Education 3 Types of Heating Appliances 1.Natural draft - has no fans to assist with exhaust (uses a draft diverter to create draft) 2.Induced draft – metal B-vent flue (80%) 3.Power-vent – PVC flue not sealed combustion - Power-vent – PVC flue sealed combustion 53

54 Energy Efficiency Education Natural Draft Furnace This type of furnace relies on stack-effect (convection) to vent the flue gases out of the home through the B-Vent or chimney. Stopped manufacturing in

55 Energy Efficiency Education 80% Induced Draft Furnace This type of furnace utilizes an induced draft fan to start the venting process then relies on stack-effect (convection) to vent the flue gases out of the home through the B-Vent or chimney. Started manufacturing in

56 Energy Efficiency Education Induced Draft Fan Induced draft fan pulls the gases out of the heat exchanger and gets the flue gases flowing into the vent connector. Once the flue starts warming, stack-effect takes over and draws the gases. 56

57 Energy Efficiency Education High Efficiency / Power-Vent Furnace Often called “Condensing Furnaces”. These furnaces have a second heat exchanger to extract more heat from the flue gases. The cool gases (115° max) condense in the flue pipe requiring PVC pipe for a flue. Positive Pressure flue! 57

58 Energy Efficiency Education Condensing Furnace (2 heat exchangers) 58

59 Energy Efficiency Education Hummmm… 59 The power-vented furnace (positive pressure vent) and natural draft water heater (negative pressure vent) can not be vented into the same flue! Homeowners!

60 Energy Efficiency Education What is Back Drafting? The spilling of flue gases from natural draft or induced draft heating appliances into the home High concentrations of CO flue gases going up the flue do not pose an immediate health problem? 60

61 Energy Efficiency Education What Allows Gas to Flow Up & Out?? Answer: Convection / stack effect Important: Until the vent is purged of the cold air from the flue or chimney the appliance will spill! 61

62 Energy Efficiency Education The Flue is a “Vacuum Generator” Negative CAZ pressure 62

63 Energy Efficiency Education Causes for Appliances to Back Drafting? Excessive negative pressure in the CAZ Poor flue design No flue liner in masonry chimneys Blockage in the flue Orphaned water heater Minimal rise of the flue “Spillage” The definitive test for pass or fail 63

64 Energy Efficiency Education Max. Vent Connector Length The maximum horizontal vent connector length equals 1.5’ of run for each inch of connector diameter. Example: 3” (dia. vent) x 1.5’ = 4.5’ length of vent connector Never install a smaller diameter vent connector than the draft diverter outlet! 64

65 Energy Efficiency Education Calculation for an Oversize Flue… The flow area of the largest section of vertical vent or chimney shall not exceed 7 times the smallest listed appliance categorized vent area, flue collar area, or draft hood outlet area. Example: DWH with a 3” diameter draft hood Formula: R x R x ⫪ = area of a circle 1.5” (R) x 1.5” (R) x 3.14 (⫪) = 7 sq” 7sq” x 7 (7 times draft hood dia.) = 49 sq” 65

66 Energy Efficiency Education Vent Pipe Area Chart 4” – ” – ” – ” – ” – ” – ” – 78.5 Vent pipe diameters 49 sq” is the max. area 7” max. dia. vent 66

67 Energy Efficiency Education Correctly sized flue liner heats up quickly and starts drafting almost immediately! Why Installation of a Flue Liner? Oversized masonry chimney hard to draft, cold and condensation on the inside, rotting of mortar joints, ect… Installation of a flue liner run from the top down into the basement connecting the heating appliance to outside. 67

68 Energy Efficiency Education Furnace Heat Exchanger (all furnaces) A heat exchanger allows the transfer of heat (btu’s) from burning gases into the air stream flowing across the outside of the heat exchanger and into the home. The flue gases and the warmed air cannot mix. 68

69 Energy Efficiency Education Cracked Heat Exchanger This cracked heat exchanger can allow flue gases into the air stream flowing into the home. This condition is usually caused by lack of air flowing across the heat exchanger overheating the heat exchanger due to an air flow restriction to the furnace blower. 69

70 Energy Efficiency Education Look for Flame Interference At the time the blower turns on observe the burners for flame for interference. Higher pressure air from the blower blows in through a crack in the heat exchanger and changes the normal appearance of the flame. Have the assumed cracked heat exchanger verified by a professional!! 70

71 Energy Efficiency Education Combustible Gas Leak Detection 71

72 Energy Efficiency Education KaBoom…… 72

73 Energy Efficiency Education CGD (Combustible Gas Detector) 73 Location of the sensor. It takes about a minute to warm up On/Off – sensitivity adjustment Batteries Visual lighted sensitivity scale Flexible wand BPI refers to a gas leak detector as a “CGD”. This is the same CGD you will be using.

74 Energy Efficiency Education Combustible Gas Leak Detection In the absence of manufacturer instructions, perform gas leak testing as follows: Hold the wand of the CGD within an inch of the line, starting at the first joint closest to the outlet of the LP tank or natural gas meter outlet. Move the wand in a 360-degree circle around the entire joint at a rate of 1” per second. All connections thereafter shall be tested in the same manner. 74

75 Energy Efficiency Education Combustible Gas Leak Detection The gas leakage inspection shall include the following components: All accessible gas piping fittings from the outlet of the natural gas meter or LP tank to a point where the supply line connects to the gas valve of all appliances. Do not move appliances. 75

76 Energy Efficiency Education Gas Leak Detection Check the gas meter and outdoor gas pipes for leaks. Note: Natural gas is lighter than air. Hold the tip of your sniffer near the top of the pipe. Propane is heavier than air. Holder your sniffer near the bottom of the pipe 76 To pinpoint gas leaks use soap and water.

77 Energy Efficiency Education Personal Safety During Testing 77

78 Energy Efficiency Education Combustion Safety – 4 Tests 1.Combustible Gas Detection 2.CAZ worst case test – entire house 3.Spillage – use smoke or mirror at diverter 4.CO – measured before dilution 78

79 Energy Efficiency Education Safe Entry & Working Conditions Immediately upon entering the building, a sample of the ambient air shall be taken to determine the level of CO in the building by conducting measurements in the occupied space and including utility rooms. Gas leak detection: Indoor air shall be sampled in at least one location per floor of occupied space upon entering the home. 79

80 Energy Efficiency Education Personal CO Monitors The auditor shall comply with CO exposure action levels specified in the manufacturer’s instructions and, in any case, shall not proceed with work when time weighted average CO concentrations in the work environment exceed 50 ppm for one hour and/or 200 ppm for eight hours. 80

81 Energy Efficiency Education Time Weighted Average (TWA) The time weighted average (TWA) is the accumulated reading of the gas concentration since the monitor was turned on, divided by 8 hours. 81

82 Energy Efficiency Education Indoor Ambient CO Levels The following slides will state certain indoor ambient CO levels measured within the home. This is not be confused with the CO levels measured in the ambient air at the time of testing heating appliances. The Stop Work level is 35 ppm

83 Energy Efficiency Education Ambient CO Below 9 ppm If the CO instrument indicates ambient CO below 9 ppm, the auditor shall proceed with the audit. 83

84 Energy Efficiency Education Ambient CO 9 – 35 ppm If the instrument indicates an ambient reading between 9 ppm and 35 ppm, the auditor shall advise the occupant that CO has been detected and recommend that all possible sources of CO be checked and windows and doors opened. Where it appears that the source of CO is a permanently installed appliance, the appliance shall be inspected and the owner shall be advised to contact a qualified servicing agent. 84

85 Energy Efficiency Education Ambient CO 36 – 69 ppm If the instrument indicates an ambient reading between 36 ppm and 69 ppm, the auditor shall advise the occupant that elevated levels of ambient CO have been detected and recommend that all possible sources of CO be turned off immediately and windows and doors opened. Where it appears that the source of CO is a permanently installed appliance, the appliance shall be turned off and the owner shall be advised to contact a qualified servicing agent. 85

86 Energy Efficiency Education Ambient CO 70 ppm or Greater If the instrument indicates an ambient carbon monoxide level of 70 ppm or greater, the auditor shall immediately terminate the inspection, notify the occupant of the need for all building occupants to evacuate the building; the auditor shall immediately leave the building. 86

87 Energy Efficiency Education Combustion Appliance Zone Testing 87

88 Energy Efficiency Education Monitor Your Breathing Zone Ambient CO shall be monitored at all times during the test. If measured CO levels exceed 35 ppm as measured at any time during the test, testing shall stop. You breath with your nose and mouth not your butt! Abort if CO goes over 35 ppm! 88

89 Energy Efficiency Education Condensed BPI Standards Version… 1.Close exterior doors & windows, turn off all exhaust fans and air handlers 2.Close all interior doors except doors to rooms with an exhaust fan or a return 3.Measure CAZ pressure WRT outside Record Pressure 4.Turn on dryer (clean lint trap) and exhaust Record Pressure 5.Turn on air handler Record Pressure 6.Open CAZ doors (check with smoke) Record Pressure 7.Put CAZ into worst case condition for testing 89

90 Energy Efficiency Education My Interpretation with BPI’s Input 90 Water heater Furnace Kitchen range hood flow rating is 400 cfm 0

91 Energy Efficiency Education Water Heater (Warm vent) Spillage & CO Testing 91

92 Energy Efficiency Education Pre-spillage Test Checklist… It would be a good idea to do the flowing items before you start testing: Observe vent design issues Drill holes as needed while flue is still cool Check for gas leaks 92

93 Energy Efficiency Education Observe Flue Design Issues 93

94 Energy Efficiency Education Water Heater Spillage Fire appliance and check for spillage at the draft diverter in two places (min.) with smoke or a mirror starting with the smallest btu appliance first Appliance has 60 seconds to prove draft 94

95 Energy Efficiency Education Check for Spillage Here Water Heater Draft Hood Water Heater Chimney Check for spillage here Vent Connector 95

96 Energy Efficiency Education Spillage Testing – (Water Heater) Starting with the appliance with smallest BTU input rating, follow lighting instructions and place in operation. Adjust the thermostat or control so the appliance will operate continuously. 96 Abort if CO goes over 35 ppm!

97 Energy Efficiency Education Spillage Testing – (Water Heater) Domestic Water Heater or Warm Vent Spillage shall be assessed and CO Air Free measurement of undiluted flue gas shall be taken at 1 minute of main burner operation and again at 2 minutes. CO Air-Free measurement of undiluted flue gas shall continue be taken at 1 minute intervals for a total of 5 minutes. 97

98 Energy Efficiency Education Action Levels – (Water Heater) If spillage ends at 1 minute of main burner operation and CO Air Free level is at or below the CO thresholds established in Section 7.8.5, Table G.6 throughout testing period, no action is required. 98

99 Energy Efficiency Education Action Levels – (Water Heater) If spillage occurs at 1 minute of main burner operation, but spillage stops at 2 minutes and the CO Air Free level falls to a point at or below the CO threshold established in Section 7.8.5, Table G-6 at the 5 minute interval, recommend that the appliance be serviced by a qualified professional. 99

100 Energy Efficiency Education Action Levels – (Water Heater) If spillage occurs at 2 minutes and/or the CO Air Free level is above the CO thresholds established in Section 7.8.5, Table G.6 at 5 minutes of main burner operation, the auditor shall notify the homeowner that it is imperative the appliance be serviced immediately by a qualified professional. 100

101 Energy Efficiency Education BPI CO Thresholds Page

102 Energy Efficiency Education Test Next Bigger Appliance Cool the vent before testing the next higher btu appliance Let the Worst Case depressurization cool the vent or, turn the Blower Door on for a few minutes Test appliance for: spillage & CO under Worst Case conditions 102

103 Energy Efficiency Education Furnace (Warm vent) Spillage & CO Testing 103

104 Energy Efficiency Education Natural Draft Furnace Test here for CO in each chamber Test for spillage here Measure CO in each port. Record highest level to compare to BPI Action Levels 104

105 Energy Efficiency Education 80% Induced Draft Furnace 80% Furnace 1.Spillage 2.CO Where do you test for spillage and CO with this configuration of heating equipment? 105

106 Energy Efficiency Education Direct Vent & Power-Vented CO Test If the outlet of the exhaust is accessible, include a CO test on all direct vented and power- vented appliances (without atmospheric chimneys). No spillage test. 106

107 Energy Efficiency Education Spillage & CO Testing – (Furnace) Cold Vent (Except Domestic Water Heaters) Spillage shall be assessed and CO Air Free measurement of undiluted flue gas shall be taken at 1 minute of main burner operation and again at 1 minute intervals for 5 minutes. 107

108 Energy Efficiency Education Action Levels – (Furnace) If spillage ends and CO Air Free level is at or below the CO thresholds established in Section 7.8.5, Table G-6: at 1 minute of main burner operation and remains at or below the CO threshold at 1 minute intervals for 5 minutes of main burner operation, no action is required. Note: If CO measurements continue to rise after 5 minutes of operation, the auditor shall advise the homeowner that the appliance must be serviced by a qualified professional. 108

109 Energy Efficiency Education Action Levels – (Furnace) If spillage occurs and/or CO Air Free level is above the CO thresholds established in Section 7.8.5, Table G.6 at 1 minute of main burner operation, but spillage stops and CO Air Free level falls to a point at or below the CO threshold by the 5-minute interval of main burner operation, recommend that the appliance be serviced by a qualified professional. 109

110 Energy Efficiency Education Action Levels – (Furnace) If spillage continues and/or CO Air Free level is above the CO thresholds established in Section 7.8.5, Table G.6 at 5 minutes of main burner operation, the auditor shall notify the homeowner that it is imperative the appliance be serviced immediately by a qualified professional. 110

111 Energy Efficiency Education BPI CO Thresholds Page

112 Energy Efficiency Education Measure CO Every Minute If the CO level is going over approx. 500 ppm pull out your probe to protect you combustion analyzer!

113 Energy Efficiency Education What if You Fail the Spillage Test? 113

114 Energy Efficiency Education What If Appliance Fails Spillage? “If” an appliance fails the 60 second spillage, test again under “Natural Conditions” If the appliance fails in Worst Case, but passes under Natural Conditions what could be the problem? If the appliance fails under both conditions what could be the problem Not a BPI requirement! 114

115 Energy Efficiency Education Birds Nest 115

116 Energy Efficiency Education House Depressurization Chart Present Condition Improved Condition -7 Pa Increased House Pressure Source: The Energy Conservatory Blower Door Operators Manual – page

117 Energy Efficiency Education 117 Retro Make-up Air Damper MD6TU (6”, 8” & 10”) Range Hood Make-Up Air

118 Energy Efficiency Education Testing Gas Ovens For CO 118

119 Energy Efficiency Education Gas Oven CO Combustion cooking appliances shall be tested for ambient and vented CO using the testing procedures and action levels specified in the procedure detailed in Section **The following standard mentions how to measure of the stovetop burners. You do NOT have to do that. 119

120 Energy Efficiency Education Gas Oven CO With appliance off, inspect oven cavity and range-top exhaust vent for blockage with aluminum foil or other materials With appliance off, inspect cooktop is free from grease build-up With appliance on, measure CO above each burner and at the oven exhaust vents after 5 minutes of main burner operation. The CO should not exceed the threshold in Section 7.8.5, Table G

121 Energy Efficiency Education BPI CO Thresholds Page

122 Energy Efficiency Education Oven Vent Location 122

123 Energy Efficiency Education Typical CO Measurements From Ovens 123

124 Energy Efficiency Education Test the Garage to House Connection 124

125 Energy Efficiency Education Test the Garage to House Connection With the home depressurized to Pascals while standing in the garage test with smoke for possible connections to the house. No supply or return ducts allowed in the garage! Use a separate heating system for the garage. High priority air sealing!! 125


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