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William Lentlie – Project Leader (ME) Tim Buckner – Lead Engineer (ME) Hope Alm – Mechanical Engineer Shauna Traxler – Mechanical Engineer Andres Santizo.

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Presentation on theme: "William Lentlie – Project Leader (ME) Tim Buckner – Lead Engineer (ME) Hope Alm – Mechanical Engineer Shauna Traxler – Mechanical Engineer Andres Santizo."— Presentation transcript:

1 William Lentlie – Project Leader (ME) Tim Buckner – Lead Engineer (ME) Hope Alm – Mechanical Engineer Shauna Traxler – Mechanical Engineer Andres Santizo Matheu – Industrial Engineer Faculty Guide: Ed Hanzlik Sponsors: Dr. Mario Gomes EPA P3

2 Project overview System design Actual design summary Testing Conclusions Recommendations Questions

3 To build a small scaled version of tethered hydrofoil to compare with a simulation provided by Dr. Mario Gomes in MATLAB. Create a tow tank capable of moving a platform at a constant specified speed over the top of a stationary body of water in order to recreate a river flow passing over a hydrofoil.

4 ImportanceDescriptionHow its being Accomplished 9 Tow tank must be able to tow a platform above the surface of a stationary body of water at a constant speed Tank size meets specification Motor Speed controlled with driver Driver has different speed ranges Calculated from F=ma+Fdrag 3 The platform must allow an attachment of two different instrumented systems, a set of stationary hydrofoils and a model of a translating hydrofoil system Tank size meets specification Tank weight is below required by floor Interface allows for different attachments 9 Tow length needs to be large enough to achieve steady state Tank size meets specification Tank length = 16ft Driver will control speed and accel/decel can be set for 0-30sec 9 System size should allow for appropriately scaled model testing Tank size meets specification Total approximate weight = 150lbs Calculated from F=ma+Fdrag 3 Platform should be above or to the side of the water with no moving parts under water Cart has multiple attachment points

5 ImportanceDescriptionHow its being Accomplished 9 Platform must allow for bolting of the instrumented model away from the wall of the tank Cart has multiple attachment points 9 Measurements should be of high quality and should be made with appropriate sampling rates and resolution Encoder, DC driver speed sensor Deflection calculations performed in ANSYS Measurement device should match specification DC drive accuracy ± 1/2 rpm, encoder mounted Measurement device should match specification Timed in Labview 9 The tank must be safe for the operator and those around them Ergonomics was considered in the height of tank 9The tank must not damage the surroundings Membrane or sealant will be used to stop leaks 3The tank must be cost effectiveCost meets budget 3Easy to use and to train new users Labview useability will be a priority Users Manual / Video will be provided 9 Tank should not interfere with operation of models P12463 is aware of the size constraints

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7 Sept 11 Planning: Customer Needs & Engineer Specs Sept 11 Concept Development: Brainstorm, Concept Evaluation Oct 11 System Review: Pool vs. Tank, System Architecture Nov 11 Detail Design Review: BOM, Feasibility Analysis Dec 11 Jan 12 Manufacturing: Mini-Tank, Full Scale Tank Feb 12 Testing: Functionality, System Interaction Feb 12 Final Product: Delivery, Final Presentation

8 Proposed concepts for the tank materials. Wood structure and wood panels Steel structure and wood panels Steel structure and steel panels Proposed concepts for rails and cart Angle iron rails and skate bearings 80/20 linear motion system Machined bottom supported rail

9 Forces applied Hydrostatic Force at maximum height Point load of 200 lbf ( N) Constraints Deflection: 1/32” (7.94e-4 m) Yield Stress: 50 ksi (345 Mpa)

10 3/8 in (9.525 mm) thick, 2” SQ. (5.080 cm) Angle iron 1/4 in (6.350 mm) thick, 2” SQ. (5.080 cm) Angle iron 3/4 in ( mm) thick Plywood 16 feet (4.877 m) long 80/20 Aluminum 3/4 hp ( w) Motor 1/16 in (1.588 mm) diameter Aircraft Cable 6 in ( cm) diameter Pulleys

11 Tanks dimensions: 16 feet (4.877 m) long, 2.5 feet (0.762 m) wide, and 2 feet (0.610 m) high. Max cart towing velocity: 3.21 ± 0.10 ft/s (0.950 ± m/s) Max volume of water: 599 US gallons (2,265 L) 2 modular pieces, capable of being disassembled, moved, and reassembled by 2 people

12 Velocity Range Distance Accuracy Start Up Transients Cable Wear

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14 Tank QTYCOST Tank Walls23/32" Plywood - 4' x 8' Sheets4$87.48 Tank Walls23/32" Plywood - 4' x 8' Sheets - Mini-Tank Design1$21.87 Tank Walls#10 x 1in. Flat Head Phillips Drive Wood Screw (100 pcs)1$21.87 Tank Support2" x 2" x 1/4" Steel Angle /8" LG. - Mini Tank & Large Tank4$87.48 Tank Support2" x 2" x 1/4" Steel Angle /4" LG.2$43.74 Motor DC MotorMotion Transfer from Motor1$0.00 DC DriveSpeed control and Power Supply1$0.00 Speed SensorFeedback loop to DC driver1$0.00 Motion System 1/16" CableWire Rope - Aircraft Cable 1/16", 7x7, by the foot100$13.00 Drive PulleyTransfers Motion1$9.16 PulleyPulley with plain bronze bearings1$10.50 Rail and Platform Length Rails1" x 1" T-Slotted Extrusion2$64.88 Width Rails and Supports1" x 1" T-Slotted Extrusion-97"1$29.08 Initial Budget: $2,000 Expanded Budget: $2,500 Final Expenses: $2,169.05

15 Waterproofing plywood Liner management Leak detection Tow cable management Safety

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17 1) Upgrade the plastic liner to a more durable material. 2) Upgrade tow cable and/or drive pulley. 3) Place windows in the tank walls to allow in water visibility. 4) Upgrade the plywood panels (walls) to sheet metal panels or glass panels 5) Improve rail mounting to tank

18 EPA P3 Dr. Mario Gomes Prof. Ed Hanzlik Prof. John D. Wellin Dr. Steven Day Kelsey McConnaghy Rob Kraynik Jan Maneti Dave Hathaway FMS Mahany Welding Supply

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