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 ELECTRICAL SAFETY Gerald P. Robinson Jr., P.E. – Hatch Mott MacDonald.

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Presentation on theme: " ELECTRICAL SAFETY Gerald P. Robinson Jr., P.E. – Hatch Mott MacDonald."— Presentation transcript:

1  ELECTRICAL SAFETY Gerald P. Robinson Jr., P.E. – Hatch Mott MacDonald

2   Electrical Safety Statistics – Annually about 8000 electrical injuries are sent to hospitals. – Over 2000 workers are sent to burn centers from electrical related injuries – One person is killed by electrocution in the U.S. each day. – Approximately 2/3 of the workers killed by electrocution were not electrical workers. Electrical Safety in the Municipal Water and Wastewater Environment

3  Results of a Safety Survey conducted by NFPA – Survey of 1200 electricians: 97% had experienced an electrical shock 26 had witnessed an electrical injury 58% were exposed to the possibility of an electrical injury every day Electrical Safety in the Municipal Water and Wastewater Environment

4  Electrical Safety in the United States Based on Three Principals – All Electrical Equipment and Conductors shall be Listed/Labeled and Acceptable for Safe Electrical Operation – All Electrical Equipment and Conductors shall be installed in accordance with Nationally Accepted Codes and Standards – All Electrical Equipment and Conductors shall be Operated & Maintained in accordance with Nationally Accepted Safety Standards Electrical Safety in the Municipal Water and Wastewater Environment

5  Listed/Labeled and Acceptable Equipment – National Electrical Code (NEC) requires equipment and conductors to be “Acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction (AHJ)” Listed / Labeled by an Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory (NRTL) Evaluated by the AHJ and determined to be “Acceptable” – OSHA – 29CFR and 29CFR Electrical equipment is acceptable only if it is listed, labeled, or certified as safe by a NRTL Electrical Safety in the Municipal Water and Wastewater Environment

6  Effects of Sandy on NRTL Listed & Labeled Electrical Equipment – Did the NRTL listing remain in force after the electrical equipment was submerged in saltwater? (Listing Agency is UL for this equipment) “…the answer to the above questions is that the Listing on the equipment can no longer be considered valid, since the equipment was subjected to a condition of being submerged in water with other contaminants or exposed to significant damp conditions that were not within the equipment or component listing. “ (UL Field Evaluation of a piece of submerged electrical equipment from Sandy) Electrical Safety in the Municipal Water and Wastewater Environment

7  Installed in accordance with Nationally Accepted Codes and Standards (sample of a few codes) – National Fire Protection Association NFPA 70 – The National Electrical Code NFPA 820 – Standards for Fire Protection in Wastewater Treatment and Collection Facilities – Great Lakes Upper Mississippi Board of State Public Health and Environmental Managers Recommended Standards for Wastewater Facilities Recommended Standards for Water Works Electrical Safety in the Municipal Water and Wastewater Environment

8  Operated & Maintained in accordance with Nationally Accepted Safety Standards – OSHA - General Duty Clause states that an employer must protect its employees from recognized hazards. – NFPA 70E – Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace Electrical Safety in the Municipal Water and Wastewater Environment

9  NFPA 70E – Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace – In 1976 OSHA and NFPA began working together to address electrical safety in the workplace – In 1979 the first edition of NFPA 70E “Standard for Electrical Safety Requirements for Employee Workplaces” was published – NFPA 70E has become the “STANDARD” for Electrical Safety in the Workplace and is used by OSHA to evaluate electrical safety in the workplace using the General Care Standard Electrical Safety in the Municipal Water and Wastewater Environment

10   Responsibilities – The “Employer” is responsible for: Electrical Safety Program –Up to date drawings and diagrams –Arc Flash Analysis (updated every 5 years) –Lockout / Tagout Safety Policies and Procedures Safety Training and Retraining Personal Protective Equipment(PPE) – The “Employee” is responsible for: Following procedures established by the “Employer” Wearing Employer Provided PPE

11  Basic Electrical Hazards in the Workplace – Shock Hazard: A dangerous condition associated with the possible release of energy caused by contact or approach to energized electrical conductors or circuit parts. – Arc Flash Hazard: A dangerous condition associated with the possible release of energy caused by an electrical arc. Electrical Safety in the Municipal Water and Wastewater Environment

12   OSHA & NFPA 70E Each have Requirements for Working on ‘Live’ Equipment – Qualified electrical workers shall not be asked to work on equipment that is “hot” or “live” except for two demonstrable reasons: De-energizing introduces additional or increased hazards (e.g.* cutting ventilation to a hazardous location* emergency alarm systems or) Infeasible due to equipment design or operational limitations (e.g.* voltage testing for diagnostics * start up testing) Electrical Safety in the Municipal Water and Wastewater Environment

13  Operations – Circuit Breakers in Panelboards or Motor Control Centers with the covers closed rated 600V and below (Cat 0 PPE) – Motor Starters in Motor Control Centers and Individual Enclosures with the covers closed rated 7.2kV and below (Cat 0 PPE) – Opening hinged covers to expose energized electrical conductors or parts on equipment rated 240V or below (Cat 0 PPE) Electrical Safety in the Municipal Water and Wastewater Environment

14  Cat 0 PPE – (Natural Fiber Clothing) Long Sleeve Natural Fiber Shirt Natural Fiber Long Pants Safety Glasses Hearing Protection Leather Gloves Electrical Safety in the Municipal Water and Wastewater Environment

15  Operations – Energized Work on parts and conductors in equipment operating between 240V - 600V (Cat 2 PPE) – Circuit Breaker Operation on metal clad switchgear with the door closed rated 1kV through 38kV (Cat 2 PPE) – Work on 120V Control Circuits in metal clad switchgear rated 1kV through 38kV (Cat 2 PPE) Electrical Safety in the Municipal Water and Wastewater Environment

16  Cat 2 PPE – (Min Arc Rating of 8 cal/cm2) Arc Rated long sleeve shirt Arc Rated pants or coveralls Arc Rated Face Shield Hard Hat Safety Glasses Hearing Protection Leather Gloves Leather Work Shoes Electrical Safety in the Municipal Water and Wastewater Environment

17  Operations – Removal of Bolted Covers on energized MCCs operating at 600V and below (Cat 4 PPE) – Insertion or Removal of a Energized MCC Bucket on MCCs operating at 600V and below (Cat 4 PPE) – Work on Control Circuits Greater than 120V in metal clad switchgear rated 1kV through 38kV (Cat 4 PPE) – Circuit Breaker Operation with door open on metal clad switchgear rated 1kV through 38kV (Cat 4 PPE) Electrical Safety in the Municipal Water and Wastewater Environment

18  PPE – Category 4 (Min Arc Rating of 40 cal/cm2) Arc Rated Coveralls or Flash Suit Arc Rated Flash Suite Hood FR Hardhat Liner Hard Hat Safety Glasses Hearing Protection Arc Rated Gloves Leather Work Shoes Electrical Safety in the Municipal Water and Wastewater Environment

19  Traditional Duplex Pump Control Panel – Inner Door only designed to provide Voltage Protection – No Arc Flash Protection – Outer Door to be opened by Qualified Persons Only – Typical PPE Required (arc flash analysis required) Cat 0 to open outer door Cat 2 to open inner door Electrical Safety in the Municipal Water and Wastewater Environment

20  Effective Electrical Safety Program Needs to Include: Management Commitment to De-Energize all Electrical Equipment for Service Up to Date Electrical Drawing Arc Flash Analysis Employee Training Personal Protective Equipment Electrical Safety in the Municipal Water and Wastewater Environment

21  Questions ? Electrical Safety in the Municipal Water and Wastewater Environment


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