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From Reading to Writing + APA Overview Presented by the SSW Writing Tutors Jenny Walden, EDP Writing Tutor | Julia Schneider,

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Presentation on theme: "From Reading to Writing + APA Overview Presented by the SSW Writing Tutors Jenny Walden, EDP Writing Tutor | Julia Schneider,"— Presentation transcript:

1 From Reading to Writing + APA Overview Presented by the SSW Writing Tutors Jenny Walden, EDP Writing Tutor | Julia Schneider, MSW Day/BASW Writing Tutor | Wednesday, October 2, pm | SSW 26/30

2 Today’s Focus Part I: How to Read Effectively - Jenny Part II: Getting Started with the Writing Process - Julia Part III: APA Overview - Jenny & Julia

3 Part I: How to Read Effectively Things we’ll cover: Different strategies for critical reading Grad school reading tips Reading for the prompt

4 What is Critical Reading? Critical reading looks for ways of thinking about the subject rather than looking primarily for information. Critical Reading → Critical Writing

5 Different Strategies for Critical Reading: 1. Read actively Engage, intellectually respond, determine the purpose of the text, and distinguish the kinds of reasonings the text employs 2. Break the linear tradition Rid yourself of the idea of a 3 step linear writing process (read, think, write) Instead, stop to ask questions, challenge the writer, and pay attention to your own responses while reading.

6 Different Strategies for Critical Reading: 3. Enter the conversation Are there gaps in the argument? Do you want to challenge these gaps? Do you want to apply the argument to something the author hasn’t considered? 4. Use the margins Demystify the text by underlining important passages, asking questions, noting connections, drawing arrows, etc.

7 Different Strategies for Critical Reading: 5. Moving outside the text Every text has a context in which it was written. Try to understand the forces that moved the author to write that work. Also, think about how your identity shapes your understanding of the text.

8 "Do I really have to read every article in the syllabus?"

9 Reading Tips Reading a lot in less time ❖ Survey the material. ❖ Read the major elements (introductions and conclusions). ❖ Scan and skim the middle (do first and last paragraphs).

10 Reading Tips Understanding and retaining what you read ❖ Take notes in the margins! ❖ After finishing a reading, write a few sentences summarizing the key point in your own words. ❖ Talk it over with classmates. ❖ Bring questions to your professors and/or class discussions.

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12 Writing a good paper that doesn't address its prompt is like hopping on a one-way cruise- liner headed to the middle of the ocean: it's a nice ride, going nowhere.

13 Reading for the Prompt For focused critical reading Step 1: Understand the prompt ❖ Read the prompt carefully. ❖ Underline key words. ❖ Restate the prompt in your own words.

14 Writing Prompt: HUB Assignment 1 Taking a controversial social issue of interest to you, the assignment asks you to: ●engage with, identify, and begin to critically analyze the social and political ideas shaping the public debate over the issue (and thus related American social policies and programs), using the analytic frameworks (political- economic paradigms and social justice theories) we have learned about in class; and, ●articulate and defend your own position on the issue you selected.

15 Reading for the Prompt For focused critical reading Step 2: Critical Reading ❖ Consider your topic choice. ❖ Pay close attention to prompt themes in the text. ❖ Begin analyzing the text in preparation for writing.

16 Part II: Getting Started with the Writing Process Things we’ll cover: How to get started with a paper How to format a paper/outlining Developing theses and claims Supporting your argument Quoting & paraphrasing - incorporating the readings

17 From Reading to Writing Organizing your thoughts, organizing your paper ●Find your writing process: brainstorm, outline, freewrite, chat with a colleague, etc. ●What about the readings caught your eye? What excited you? What frustrated you? ●Talk it out. Map it out. Draw it out. ●Once you get all of your ideas out, step back and focus in on one specific idea.

18 How to Format your Paper In the words of Professor Jennie Romich, when you write a paper: 1.Tell ‘em what you’re gonna tell ‘em. 2.Tell ‘em. 3.Tell ‘em what you told ‘em.

19 Outlining Intro Paragraph (tell ‘em what you’re gonna tell ‘em) o Thesis Statement Body Paragraph 1 - Supporting Idea/Claim 1 (tell ‘em) o Transition o Topic sentence o Evidence/Quotes  Analyze  Interpret o Evidence/Quotes  Analyze  Interpret Body Paragraph 2 - Supporting Idea/Claim 2 (tell ‘em) Body Paragraph 3 - Supporting Idea/Claim 3 (tell ‘em) Conclusion (tell ‘em what you told ‘em)

20 Outlining Intro Paragraph (tell ‘em what you’re gonna tell ‘em) o Thesis Statement Body Paragraph 1 - Supporting Idea/Claim 1 (tell ‘em) o Transition o Topic sentence o Evidence/Quotes  Analyze  Interpret o Evidence/Quotes  Analyze  Interpret Body Paragraph 2 - Supporting Idea/Claim 2 (tell ‘em) Body Paragraph 3 - Supporting Idea/Claim 3 (tell ‘em) Conclusion (tell ‘em what you told ‘em)

21 Intro Paragraph (aka tell ‘em what you’re gonna tell ‘em) ●Get the reader’s attention. ●Provide background info/contextualize. ●Make thesis statement - topic, claim, main points, evidence.

22 Thesis Statement Create an argument ●A thesis statement is a specific claim that you will argue for and explore in your paper. ● Take a stance; argue a position. ● Arguable claims: (1) are persuasive and convincing. (2) tackle an issue/problem/question for which no easy answer exists. (3) invite a variety of possible perspectives.

23 Thesis Statements Hot tips Choose a topic that interests you! You’re going to spend some time getting cozy with a paper, so make sure you’re actually interested in what you’re going to write. You’re writing these papers for a reason. It’s not just about the class or your grade. Choose something you’re passionate about that will advance your learning as a social worker! Be flexible and open-minded. It’s okay if your thesis and topic change as you go… Writing is a process.

24 Outlining Intro Paragraph (tell ‘em what you’re gonna tell ‘em) o Thesis Statement Body Paragraph 1 - Supporting Idea/Claim 1 (tell ‘em) o Transition o Topic sentence o Evidence/Quotes  Analyze  Interpret o Evidence/Quotes  Analyze  Interpret Body Paragraph 2 - Supporting Idea/Claim 2 (tell ‘em) Body Paragraph 3 - Supporting Idea/Claim 3 (tell ‘em) Conclusion (tell ‘em what you told ‘em)

25 Body Paragraphs (aka tell ‘em) ●Use transitions to guide the reader from one idea to the next. ●State a topic sentence that introduces that paragraph and what ideas you’re going to tackle. ●Make sure each paragraph furthers your argument in a logical manner. ●Provide examples (quotes, summaries, paraphrases, statistics, stories, etc.) from your text or research. Don’t forget to cite anything that didn’t grow in your brain! ●Analyze the example -- why is it important/relevant to your claim and thesis statement? What does it mean? ●Wrap it up -- make a concluding statement.

26 Body Paragraphs Simplified ●Insert a topic sentence. ●Explain your topic sentence. ●Introduce your evidence. ●Insert your evidence. ●Unpack your evidence. ●Explain your evidence. ●Insert a concluding sentence.

27 Outlining Intro Paragraph (tell ‘em what you’re gonna tell ‘em) o Thesis Statement Body Paragraph 1 - Supporting Idea/Claim 1 (tell ‘em) o Transition o Topic sentence o Evidence/Quotes  Analyze  Interpret o Evidence/Quotes  Analyze  Interpret Body Paragraph 2 - Supporting Idea/Claim 2 (tell ‘em) Body Paragraph 3 - Supporting Idea/Claim 3 (tell ‘em) Conclusion (tell ‘em what you told ‘em)

28 Conclusion (aka tell ‘em what you told ‘em… and then some) ● Your last contact with the reader; make it count! ● Restate your thesis. ● Summarize your claims and evidence. ● Show how you proved your thesis statement! ●Create a sense of development or movement to a more complex understanding of the subject of your paper. ● So what? Why does it matter? Discuss implications, relevance, significance, next steps. ● This is the climax of your paper. Don’t just rehash your intro. go out with a bang!

29 Quotes & Paraphrases Incorporating the readings Quotes are: o word for word (verbatim) from the text o in quotation marks (unless a block quote) o usually brief o supportive of your claims, evidence, and examples o used when you just can’t say it any better than the original author did Paraphrases are: o ideas from the text put in your own words o not in quotations o supportive of your claims, evidence, and examples o helpful to condense/summarize a long and/or complex passage or chart

30 Plagiarism What is it? Plagiarism occurs when you use someone else’s words or ideas as your own and do not give them credit (whether on purpose or not). If you got the idea from someone else, you have to acknowledge that.

31 Paraphrasing & plagiarism Don’t accidentally plagiarize when you paraphrase! When you paraphrase something, you aren’t just replacing a few words with synonyms or changing the sentence order. Paraphrases should be a completely new way of expressing the same idea as the original text. Don’t forget to cite your paraphrases! o If the idea isn’t yours, then cite it. o If in doubt, cite it.

32 Part III: APA Overview Things we’ll cover: What it is/who uses it Citations Reference list Software/online generators

33 APA American Psychological Association What is it? Who else uses it? o Social Sciences (Psyc, Socio, Econ, Poli Sci) o Business o Education o Nursing

34 When to Cite When should you cite sources? o “Authors do not present the work of another as if it were their own work” (APA, 2010, p. 16). o According to APA (2010), “Whether paraphrasing, quoting the author directly, or describing an idea that influenced your work, you must credit the source” (p. 170). o “Provide documentation of all facts and figures that are not common knowledge” (APA, 2010, p. 169).

35 Short Quotes less than 4 lines types or <40 words in quotes flow with the rest of the paper period comes after the in-text citation Example: According to Jones (1998), “Students often had difficulty using APA style, especially when it was their first time” (p. 199).

36 Block Quotes 4+ lines typed or 40+ words not in quotes indented ½ inch from the left margin double-spaced closing punctuation mark comes before parenthetical citation Example: Jones’s (1998) study found the following: Students often had difficulty using APA style, especially when it was their first time citing sources. This difficulty could be attributed to the fact that many students failed to purchase a style manual or to ask their teacher for help. (p. 199)

37 In-text Citations: Indirect Quotations (paraphrasing) Kessler (2003) found that among epidemiological samples… Early onset result in a more persistent and severe course (Kessler, 2003). In 2003, Kessler’s study of epidemiological samples showed that…

38 In-text Citations: Indirect Quotations (paraphrasing) Two Authors o In-text: Walker and Allen (2004) o Parenthetical format: (Walker & Allen, 2004) More than Two Authors o First citation: list all authors  Example: Bradley, Ramirez, and Soo (2006) o Second citation: list first author followed by et al.  Example: Bradley et al. (2006)

39 In-text Citations: Short, Direct Quotations “..early onset result in a more persistent and severe course” Kessler (2003) found that among epidemiological samples “early onset result in a more persistent and severe course” (p. 22). Among epidemiological samples “early onset result in a more persistent and severe course” (Kessler, 2003, p. 22).

40 In-text Citations: Short, Direct Quotations Two Authors o In-text: Walker and Allen (2004).... “quote” (p. 15). o Parenthetical format: (Walker & Allen, 2004, p. 15) More than Two Authors o First citation: list all authors  Example: Bradley, Ramirez, and Soo (2006)... “quote” (p. 36). o Second citation: list first author followed by et al.  Example: Bradley et al. (2006)... “quote” (p. 36).

41 Main Takeaway Paraphrases → Author(s), Year, Page Number if known*...(Kessler, 2003). -or- Kessler (2003).... Short quotes → Author(s), Year, Page Number “...” (Kessler, 2003, p. 22). -or- Kessler (2003) “....” (p. 22). *APA encourages you to include the page number, but it is not required.

42 Reference List: Periodical Author, A. A., Author, B. B., & Author, C. C.(year). Title of article. Title of Periodical, volume #(issue #), pp-pp. Herbst-Damm, K. L., & Kulik, J. A. (2005). Volunteer support, marital status, and the survival times of terminally ill patients. Health Psychology, 24,

43 Reference List: Online Periodical Author, A. A., Author, B. B., & Author, C. C. (year). Title of article. Title of Periodical, volume #(issue #) pp-pp. Retrieved from McGowan, J. (2002). Understanding jazz styles through sociolinguistic models. Discourses in Music, 4(1), Retrieved from

44 APA Websites/Generators Useful APA websites o Purdue OWL: APA Formatting o Odegaard’s Writing Resources website o APA Lite for College Papers APA Generators o BibMe: o Son of Citation Machine: o Citefast:

45 References American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6 th ed.). Washington DC: American Psychological Association. Fitzgerald, Peter. (2010). Critical Reading and Thinking. Retrieved from 12/15/critical-reading-and-thinking/ Knott, D. (2012). Critical Reading Towards Critical Writing. Writing at the University of Toronto. Retrieved from Odegaard Writing & Research Center. (n.d.) Claims, Claims, Claims. Adapted from UW Expository Writing Program handouts. Retrieved from Odegaard Writing & Research Center. (n.d.) Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing. Adapted from UW Expository Writing Program handouts. Retrieved from Odegaard Writing & Research Center. (n.d.) Strong Body Paragraphs. Adapted from UW Expository Writing Program handouts. Retrieved from Odegaard Writing & Research Center. (n.d.) Introductions & Conclusions. Adapted from UW Expository Writing Program handouts. Retrieved from

46 Join us for the next Writing Workshop! Topic: 500/501 Papers Led by: Jim and Erin, the course subject tutors! When: Wednesday, October 9th, 5:30-6:30pm Where: SSW 305 B


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