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World War I (1914–1918) Imperial, territorial, and economic rivalries led to the “Great War” between the Central Powers Allies (U.S., Britain, France,

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Presentation on theme: "World War I (1914–1918) Imperial, territorial, and economic rivalries led to the “Great War” between the Central Powers Allies (U.S., Britain, France,"— Presentation transcript:

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3 World War I (1914–1918) Imperial, territorial, and economic rivalries led to the “Great War” between the Central Powers Allies (U.S., Britain, France, Russia, Belgium, Serbia, Greece, Romania, Montenegro, Portugal, Italy, and Japan Imperial, territorial, and economic rivalries led to the “Great War” between the Central Powers (Austria-Hungary, Germany, Bulgaria, and Turkey) and the Allies (U.S., Britain, France, Russia, Belgium, Serbia, Greece, Romania, Montenegro, Portugal, Italy, and Japan ). About 10 million combatants killed, 20 million wounded.

4 TWO SIDES OF WWI Great Britain France Russia Serbia Belgium U.S. (later) Italy Germany Austria- Hungary Bulgaria Turkey ALLIESCENTRAL POWERS

5 German submarine sank the British ocean liner Lusitania German submarine sank the British ocean liner Lusitanian More than 1,000 passengers were killed, including 128 Americans.

6 May 17, 1915 A German submarine sank the British ocean liner Lusitania The people of the United States were shocked! Wilson did not declare war asked Germany for an apology* and for a promise not to attack any more passenger ships. May 7, 1915 brought the United States into World War I. A German submarine sank the British ocean liner Lusitania off the coast of Ireland. More than 1,000 passengers were killed, including 128 Americans. The people of the United States were shocked! Wilson did not declare war, but instead asked Germany for an apology*, for damages to be paid, and for a promise not to attack any more passenger ships.

7 US Road to War The Last Straw Zimmerman Note

8 In March 1917, a German official, Arthur Zimmermann, cabled the German ambassador in Mexico, proposing that Mexico ally itself with Germany. In return, Mexico would regain territory it had earlier lost to the United States. TEXAS, NEW MEXICO, AND ARIZONA

9 Turning Point in WW1 In September 1918, Pershing put together the most massive attack in American history, causing one GERMAN position after another to fall to the advancing American troops. In September 1918, Pershing put together the most massive attack in American history, causing one GERMAN position after another to fall to the advancing American troops. On November 11, 1918, Germany signed an ARMISTICE, or cease-fire, that ended the war. On November 11, 1918, Germany signed an ARMISTICE, or cease-fire, that ended the war.

10 RED SCARE RED SCARE After WWI, Americans associated communism with disloyalty and unpatriotic behavior.

11 Trench Warfare The two armies dug trenches to protect themselves from bullets and bombs. Then they put up mazes of barbed wire around the trenches. The area between the trenches was called "no man's land." Soldiers ate and slept in the trenches. First one side, and then the other would try to break through at some point along the line. It was very difficult for either side to win a battle this way, and trench warfare claimed many lives.

12 US Road to War May 7 th 1915 Sinking of the Lusitania

13 Trench Warfare

14 WHEN… Austrian Archduke Francis Ferdinand and wife assassinated by Serbian nationalist, A assassin fromSecret “BLACK HAND SocietyAustrian Archduke Francis Ferdinand and wife assassinated by Serbian nationalist, A assassin from Secret “BLACK HAND Society (June 28). That started a domino effect of wars in Europe.That started a domino effect of wars in Europe. Austria declares war on Serbia Britain declares war on Germany

15 Trench Warfare “No Man’s Land”

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17 NEW WEAPONS OF WWI TANKS – BRITISH FLAME THROWER – GERMANS U-BOATS (UNTERSEEBOOTEN) AIRPLANES GAS POISON MUSTARD MACHINE GUNS TANK TRAPS NEW WAY TO FIGHT – TRENCH WARFARE MINES

18 Government Excess & Threats to the Civil Liberties of Americans Schenck v. US 3. Schenck v. US – in ordinary times the mailing of the leaflets would have been protected by the 1 st Amendment. - BUT, every act of speech must be judged acc. to the circumstances in which it was spoken. - If an act of speech posed a clear and present danger, then Congress had the power to restrain such speech.

19 To prevent strikes, the government established the NATIONAL WAR LABOR BOARD (NWLB) in In exchange for wage increases, an 8-hour workday, and the right to organize unions & bargain collectively, the labor leaders agreed not to disrupt war production with a strike.

20 It was a draft to build up U.S military forces. Passed in May 1917, the act required all men aged 21 to 30 to register for military duty.

21 1.Stripped Germany of its armed forces 2.Pay reimbursement for damages to the Allies 3.Required Germany to acknowledge GUILT for the outbreak and devastation caused by World War I.

22 The fourteenth point, known as the LEAGUE OF NATIONS, called for member nations to help preserve peace and prevent future war.

23 Espionage Act: Specified of antiwar activities that’s demanded fines or imprisonment Sedition (treason) Amendment: Provided punishment to anyone using, “disloyal…, in regard to the U.S government, flag or military.

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25 SUSSEX PLEDGEa promise made by Germany to stop sinking merchant ships, kept the USA out of the war for a bit longer.  The SUSSEX PLEDGE, a promise made by Germany to stop sinking merchant ships, kept the USA out of the war for a bit longer.


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