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Instructional Support PPT 1. LEQ: How do I analyze how elements of a story interact? Student Learning Targets: I can identify the elements of a Freytag’s.

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Presentation on theme: "Instructional Support PPT 1. LEQ: How do I analyze how elements of a story interact? Student Learning Targets: I can identify the elements of a Freytag’s."— Presentation transcript:

1 Instructional Support PPT 1

2 LEQ: How do I analyze how elements of a story interact? Student Learning Targets: I can identify the elements of a Freytag’s pyramid and characterization. I am learning to analyze how these elements interact with each other I know how to explain these interactions with text evidence and personal connections to self.

3 Did You Know?  Jules Verne (1828–1905)- considered to be first serious writer of science fiction; imagined devices and human abilities that did not become realities until after his death; characters rode in airplanes and submarines before anyone had seen one; books include Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea & A Journey to the Center of the Earth.  Madeleine L’Engle ( ) wrote A Wrinkle in Time in the early 1960s, when science was a popular topic; United States was trying to be the first country in the world to send people into space; throughout 1950s, the former Soviet Union and the United States competed with each other extensively ; The Soviet Union was the first nation to put a satellite in orbit (Sputnik); to improve its space program, the U.S. government established the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA); U.S. wanted to be first to moon; during this period of early space exploration that L’Engle wrote A Wrinkle in Time.

4 This sets the scene/hooks the reader. Here the writer introduces the characters and setting making sure to provide descriptions and background information.

5 Something happens to begin the action. A single event usually signals the beginning of the main conflict. The inciting incident is sometimes called 'the complication'.

6 This sets the scene/hooks the reader. Here the writer introduces the characters and setting making sure to provide descriptions and background information. Something happens to begin the action. A single event usually signals the beginning of the main conflict. The inciting incident is sometimes called 'the complication'. The story builds and gets more exciting. There can be several events that occur here.

7 This sets the scene/hooks the reader. Here the writer introduces the characters and setting making sure to provide descriptions and background information. Something happens to begin the action. A single event usually signals the beginning of the main conflict. The inciting incident is sometimes called 'the complication'. The story builds and gets more exciting. There can be several events that occur here. The moment of greatest tension in a story. This is often the most exciting event. It is the event that the rising action builds up to and that the falling action follows.

8 This sets the scene/hooks the reader. Here the writer introduces the characters and setting making sure to provide descriptions and background information. Something happens to begin the action. A single event usually signals the beginning of the main conflict. The inciting incident is sometimes called 'the complication'. The story builds and gets more exciting. There can be several events that occur here. The moment of greatest tension in a story. This is often the most exciting event. It is the event that the rising action builds up to and that the falling action follows. Events happen as a result of the climax and we know that the story will soon end.

9 This sets the scene/hooks the reader. Here the writer introduces the characters and setting making sure to provide descriptions and background information. Something happens to begin the action. A single event usually signals the beginning of the main conflict. The inciting incident is sometimes called 'the complication '. The story builds and gets more exciting. There can be several events that occur here. The moment of greatest tension in a story. This is often the most exciting event. It is the event that the rising action builds up to and that the falling action follows. Events happen as a result of the climax and we know that the story will soon end. The character solves the main problem/conflict or someone solves it for him or her.

10 Lesson Focus- Chapters 1-4 What skills, strengths, ideas, or beliefs help you meet everyday challenges? Make a list of 5 things you rely on when faced with a challenge. – perseverance, bravery, trust, parents/adults, guts

11 This sets the scene/hooks the reader. Here the writer introduces the characters and setting making sure to provide descriptions and background information. Something happens to begin the action. A single event usually signals the beginning of the main conflict. The inciting incident is sometimes called 'the complication'. The story builds and gets more exciting. There can be several events that occur here. The moment of greatest tension in a story. This is often the most exciting event. It is the event that the rising action builds up to and that the falling action follows. Events happen as a result of the climax and we know that the story will soon end. The character solves the main problem/conflict or someone solves it for him or her. The ending. At this point, any remaining secrets, questions or mysteries which remain after the resolution are solved by the characters or explained by the author. Sometimes the author leaves us to think about the THEME or future possibilities for the characters.

12 Context Clues Activity WordContext MeaningActual Meaning 1.assimilate 2. tangible 3. diction 4. ephemeral 5. relinquish

13 Sentences: 1.The Borg will assimilate the humans, and they will become a part of the collective. 2.Ghosts are not tangible; your hands will pass straight through them. 3.When you go to a foreign county, the diction of people who speak English as a second language may lead to some confusion. 4.His victory over his older brother was ephemeral. His brother immediately got up and started chasing him again. 5.After a brief tug-of war, my three year old nephew decided to relinquish the scissors in favor of a cookie.

14 How did you do? Remember do not copy definitions, but put them in your own words for your own understanding. If you were close, just draw an arrow from column two to column three. 1.assimilate [ə simə la  ̄ t´] v. to absorb; to understand 2.tangible [tanjə bəl] adj. touchable; real; solid 3.diction [dikshən] n. manner of speaking; pronunciation 4.ephemeral [i femər əl ] adj. short-lived; temporary 5.relinquish [ri linkwish] v. to let go; to abandon


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