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Click to Begin. Merit Badge Counselor Training This training module will guide new and potential merit badge counselors through their responsibilities.

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Presentation on theme: "Click to Begin. Merit Badge Counselor Training This training module will guide new and potential merit badge counselors through their responsibilities."— Presentation transcript:

1 Click to Begin

2 Merit Badge Counselor Training This training module will guide new and potential merit badge counselors through their responsibilities and will give them an understanding of the methods of counseling Scouts. It is intended as a short orientation course for new merit badge counselors before they begin working with Scouts. The course is based on the instructor-led course created and offered by the National BSA. The course will take about 60 minutes to complete. NEXT PREV

3 Training Objectives At the end of this lesson, you will be able to: Understand the aims of Scouting, the BSA advancement process, and the role of the merit badge counselor. Know a merit badge counselor's duties and responsibilities to the BSA and to the Scout. Understand and complete the requirements to be a registered merit badge counselor with the BSA. List methods of counseling and coaching. Successfully guide a Scout through the merit badge process. NEXT PREV

4 Before we start… Let's take a short quiz to see what you already know about the Boy Scout Merit Badge program. Click Next. NEXT PREV

5 Quiz Take out a piece of paper and jot down your answers to the next twelve short questions: 1.True or False: A merit badge counselor may be a counselor for only up to six merit badges. 2.True or False: A merit badge counselor may not coach his own son or close relative (i.e., nephew) unless he is part of a group of Scouts all working on the same merit badge. 3.True or False: A merit badge counselor who works only with a single unit needs only the unit committee’s approval before being approved by the Scout executive. NEXT PREV

6 Quiz 4.True or False: Persons serving as merit badge counselors must be registered as a merit badge counselor with the Boy Scouts of America. 5.True or False: A Scout may earn no more than five merit badges from the same merit badge counselor. 6.True or False: Once a Scouter is approved as a merit badge counselor, he is approved for life and never has to be reapproved. 7.True or False: A Scout must complete all the requirements for a merit badge within 12 months or he must start over. NEXT PREV

7 Quiz 8. True or False: A merit badge counselor may require the Scout to work beyond the specific requirements of the merit badge so he may discover more about the subject and continue the learning process. 9. True or False: Due to the BSA policies related to Youth Protection and two-deep leadership, a merit badge counselor must have another adult present during all merit badge counseling sessions. 10. True or False: If the weather, locale, or some other condition makes meeting all of the conditions of the merit badge requirements impractical, the merit badge counselor may substitute requirements for those stated for the merit badge. NEXT PREV

8 Quiz 11.True or False: Merit badge counselors must be at least 18 years old. 12.True or False: If the requirements for a merit badge differ between the merit badge pamphlet and the current edition of Boy Scout Requirements, the requirements in the Boy Scout Requirements book supersede all others. Set your answers aside for now. We will come back to them a little later and see how you did. NEXT PREV

9 The Aims of Scouting Before we get to deep into this training, what is Scouting all about? Fun, adventure, fellowship, and more! That is what the youth and most parents are in Scouting for. But Scouting is more than that. The Scouting program is an educational program aimed at teaching youth character development, citizenship, and mental and physical fitness. NEXT PREV

10 The Aims of Scouting These aims of Scouting are accomplished by the use of eight fundamental methods: Advancement Association with adults Personal growth Leadership development The uniform The ideals of Scouting (Scout Oath, Scout Law, Scout motto, Scout slogan) The patrol method The outdoors NEXT PREV

11 The Aims of Scouting The Ideals of Scouting The ideals of Boy Scouting are spelled out in the Scout Oath, the Scout Law, the Scout motto, and the Scout slogan. Scout Oath On my honor, I will do my best To do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law; To help other people at all times; To keep myself physically strong, mentally awake and morally straight. Scout Law A Scout is: Trustworthy, Loyal, Helpful, Friendly, Courteous, Kind, Obedient, Cheerful, Thrifty, Brave, Clean, and Reverent. Scout Motto Be Prepared! Scout Slogan Do a good turn daily. The Boy Scout measures himself against these ideals and continually tries to improve. The goals are high, and, as he reaches for them, he has some control over what and who he becomes. NEXT PREV

12 The Aims of Scouting The Patrol Method The patrol method gives Boy Scouts an experience in group living and participating citizenship. It places responsibility on young shoulders and teaches boys how to accept it. The patrol method allows Scouts to interact in small groups where they can easily relate to each other. These small groups determine troop activities through their elected representatives. NEXT PREV

13 The Aims of Scouting The Outdoors Boy Scouting is designed to take place outdoors. It is in the outdoor setting that Scouts share responsibilities and learn to live with one another. It is here that the skills and activities practiced at troop meetings come alive with purpose. Being close to nature helps Boy Scouts gain an appreciation for God's handiwork and humankind's place in it. The outdoors is the laboratory for Boy Scouts to learn ecology and practice conservation of nature's resources. NEXT PREV

14 The Aims of Scouting Advancement Boy Scouting provides a series of surmountable obstacles and steps in overcoming them through the advancement method. The Boy Scout plans his advancement and progresses at his own pace as he meets each challenge. The Boy Scout is rewarded for each achievement, which helps him gain self-confidence. The steps in the advancement system help a Boy Scout grow in self- reliance and in the ability to help others. NEXT PREV

15 The Aims of Scouting Association with Adults Boys learn a great deal by watching how adults conduct themselves. Scout leaders can be positive role models for the members of their troops. In many cases a Scoutmaster who is willing to listen to boys, encourage them, and take a sincere interest in them can make a profound difference in their lives. NEXT PREV

16 The Aims of Scouting Personal Growth As Boy Scouts plan their activities and progress toward their goals, they experience personal growth. Boys grow as they participate in community service projects and do Good Turns for others. The religious emblems program also is a large part of the personal growth method. Frequent personal conferences with his Scoutmaster help each Boy Scout to determine his growth toward Scouting's aims. NEXT PREV

17 The Aims of Scouting Leadership Development The Boy Scout program encourages boys to learn and practice leadership skills. Every Boy Scout has the opportunity to participate in both shared and total leadership situations. Understanding the concepts of leadership helps a boy accept the leadership role of others and guides him toward the citizenship aim of Scouting. NEXT PREV

18 The Aims of Scouting The Uniform The uniform makes the Boy Scout troop visible as a force for good and creates a positive youth image in the community. Boy Scouting is an action program, and wearing the uniform is an action that shows each Boy Scout's commitment to the aims and purposes of Scouting. The uniform gives the Boy Scout identity in a world brotherhood of youth who believe in the same ideals. The uniform is practical attire for Boy Scout activities and provides a way for Boy Scouts to wear the badges that show what they have accomplished. NEXT PREV

19 About Advancement Advancement is the process by which a Scout progresses from rank to rank in the Scouting program. It is simply a means to an end and not an end in itself. Everything done to advance and earn higher ranks is designed to help the Scout have an exciting and meaningful experience. NEXT PREV

20 More About Advancement The advancement method is designed to encourage a young man to accomplish a progressive series of fun and educational tasks. Earning merit badges allows Scouts to explore many fields, helps them round out their skills, and perhaps introduces them to subjects that will become lifelong interests and rewarding careers. NEXT PREV

21 What is a Merit Badge? A special part of a Scout's learning adventure, merit badges are awards presented to a Scout when he completes the requirements for one of the merit badge subjects. There are more than 100 merit badges a Scout may earn. The subject matters range from vocational and careers introduction to personal development, hobbies, sports, high adventure, citizenship, and life-skills development. NEXT PREV

22 What is a Merit Badge? Every merit badge is designed to teach the Scout new skills while outwardly encouraging him to challenge himself and have fun in the process. Merit badges offer a range of difficulty over a breadth of subject matters, and a Scout is free to pursue any merit badge he wishes. The merit badge itself is a simple embroidered patch, but the intangible end result of earning it is that the Scout gains self- confidence from overcoming obstacles to achieve a goal. NEXT PREV

23 Why Does the BSA Use Merit Badge Counselors? One of the methods of Scouting is association with quality adults. Besides a Scout's parents and relatives, his schoolteachers, his religious leaders, and possibly his sports coaches, most Scout-age youth do not have much contact with many other adults or professionals. Merit badge counselors provide an excellent means for a Scout to grow through his exposure to outstanding adults who serve as examples and mentors to them. NEXT PREV

24 Why Does the BSA Use Merit Badge Counselors? The opportunity to deal with business leaders, trained specialists, and experienced hobbyists while in the pursuit of a merit badge offers the Scout a chance for personal growth and possibly a life- altering experience. If you were a Scout, did any of the merit badges you earned influence you in your choice of careers? If not, did you wish you had something like the Merit Badge Program? How would that have had an impact on your choice of careers? NEXT PREV

25 Why Does the BSA Use Merit Badge Counselors? The BSA recognizes that the merit badge counselor is the cornerstone to the merit badge program. By offering their time, experience, and knowledge to guide Scouts in one or more merit badge subjects, counselors help shape the future of our country. By assisting as the Scout plans projects and activities necessary to meet the merit badge requirements, and by coaching the Scout through interviews and demonstrations, the quality adult contact fostered by this working relationship can only enhance the Scout's self-confidence and growth. NEXT PREV

26 What Is a Merit Badge Counselor? A merit badge counselor is both a teacher and a mentor to the Scout as he works on the merit badge. Merit badge counselors should be satisfied that each Scout under their guidance meets all the requirements set forth for the merit badge. In this sense, a merit badge counselor is an examiner. NEXT PREV

27 What Is a Merit Badge Counselor? In a larger sense, the real opportunity for a counselor lies in coaching—helping Scouts over the different hurdles of the requirements and helping make them aware of the deeper aspects of the subject from their knowledge and experience. NEXT PREV

28 What Is a Merit Badge Counselor? The merit badge counselor may help a Scout by providing instruction and guidance on the subject matter. However, the counselor must not complete the Scout's work on the requirements. The counselor needs to test the Scout to ensure that he has completed all the required work but may not modify the merit badge requirements in the process. This standard ensures that the advancement requirements are fair and uniform for all Scouts. NEXT PREV

29 What Is a Merit Badge Counselor? A merit badge counselor must always ensure that a Scout has a "buddy" present at all instruction sessions. Working on merit badges is especially enjoyable when Scouts work together, and the BSA encourages this by making the buddy system a part of the merit badge program. Together the two meet with merit badge counselors, plan projects, and keep their enthusiasm high. The Scout's buddy could be another Scout, a parent or guardian, brother or sister, relative, or friend. The Scout should bring a buddy to all his appointments with his counselor. NEXT PREV

30 Keeping to the Standards Earlier we said that the counselor may not modify the merit badge requirements in the process. This standard ensures that the advancement requirements are fair and uniform for all Scouts. Let’s look at a conversation between two Scouts getting ready to work on a few merit badges. NEXT PREV

31 Keeping to the Standards Scout 1: “Know any good counselors for the Citizenship merit badges? They are the only ones I have left for Eagle Scout.” Scout 2: “Oh cool. I am getting ready to work on those too. I just got a list of a few counselors from our Scoutmaster.” Scout 1: “Who is on the list?” Scout 2: “Mr. Jones over in South City, Mrs. Fredrickson from the high school, and Mr. Grey.” NEXT PREV

32 Keeping to the Standards Scout 1: “Mr. Grey? I know he is here in our own troop, but he is the last one I would go to. He always adds requirements and makes a merit badge so much harder than is should be. He says we get extra learning that way.” Scout 2: “That isn’t right. But we could always go over to Mr. Grey. I went to him for First Aid last year. He was about the easiest merit badge counselor I could have gone to. Even though I knew everything, he pretty much didn’t ask me to demonstrate anything. All I needed to do was to tell him the general ideas of bandages and how they were used.” NEXT PREV

33 Keeping to the Standards Scout 2: “That isn’t right. But we could always go over to Mr. Grey. I went to him for First Aid last year. He was about the easiest merit badge counselor I could have gone to. Even though I knew everything, he pretty much didn’t ask me to demonstrate anything. All I needed to do was to tell him the general ideas of bandages and how they were used.” Scout 1: “Wow! You’d think a First Aid merit badge counselor would want to make sure you did all the requirements.” NEXT PREV

34 Keeping to the Standards Scout 2: “Yeah, but since I did know all of the stuff, I was okay with it. But think of the guys that go to him that don’t! He signs them off anyway.” Scout 1: “Geez… wonder what he would think if a kids he signed off used a first aid skill wrong and hurt someone worse than they already were?” NEXT PREV

35 Keeping to the Standards Scout 2: “Some of these merit badge counselors should listen to the words of the Scout Oath and Law. And then follow the rules to be a counselor.” Scout 1: “I guess all we can do is to not go to the bad counselors – and maybe spread the word about them too. “ NEXT PREV

36 Keeping to the Standards What kind of counselor will you be? NEXT PREV

37 Merit Badge Counselor Requirements and Registration To qualify as a merit badge counselor, a volunteer must: Register annually with the Boy Scouts of America. Be at least 18 years old. Be of good character. Be proficient in the merit badge subject by vocation, avocation, or special training. Be able to work with Scout-age youth. Be approved by the district/council advancement committee. NEXT PREV

38 Merit Badge Counselor Requirements and Registration To register with the Boy Scouts of America, a potential merit badge counselor must complete the BSA's Adult Application form (No Y; available in Spanish as No S) and submit it along with the BSA Merit Badge Counselor Information form (No ) to the BSA local council office. NEXT PREV

39 Merit Badge Counselor Requirements and Registration Renewal of this registration annually is necessary to continue as a merit badge counselor. Each year, around April, you will be contacted by a Mount Baker Council district advancement chair. This person will ask you if you wish to continue as a merit badge counselor for another year. If you do not hear from them by the beginning of May, contact the council office and let them know if you wish to continue. NEXT PREV

40 Merit Badge Counselor Youth Protection The Boy Scouts of America requires that merit badge counselors take BSA Youth Protection training. This program addresses strategies for personal safety awareness for youth as well as adults. BSA Youth Protection policies include Two-deep leadership No one-on-one contact Respecting privacy Reporting problems NEXT PREV

41 Merit Badge Counselor Youth Protection The BSA Youth Protection guidelines have been adopted primarily for the protection of our youth members; however, they also serve to protect our adult volunteers and leaders from false accusations of abuse. BSA Youth Protection training is available online at NEXT PREV

42 What Happens After You Turn in an Application to Become A Merit Badge Counselor? The Process: The Boy Scout Adult Application, the Youth Protection passing record, and the Merit Badge form are all delivered to the local Boy Scout district executive who then validates and checks the information on the form. An is sent from either the Mount Baker Council registrar or the district executive to the applicant stating the application material has been received. NEXT PREV

43 What Happens After You Turn in an Application to Become A Merit Badge Counselor? After the adult application has been approved, the Merit Badge Application and supporting documents scanned and ed to the local district advancement committee. The district advancement committee approves or denies each merit badge on the application. The decisions are based primarily on need and the number of counselors currently signed up for a badge. NEXT PREV

44 What Happens After You Turn in an Application to Become A Merit Badge Counselor? The district advancement committee communicates with the council registrar as to their decisions. The registrar then posts the approved counselor and their selected badges to Scoutnet (the Scout database). The district advancement committee finally communicates with the applicant about the final decision and ensures that this merit badge counseling training has been taken. Once all the forms are approved, and the training all completed, the merit badge counselor is ready to meet with kids. NEXT PREV

45 What Happens After You Turn in an Application to Become A Merit Badge Counselor? Or in other words: You submit an application and take Youth Protection training. The application process goes through the approval process. You are contacted on the status of the application. If approved, you can start working with Scouts as a merit badge counselor. NEXT PREV

46 What is the Merit Badge Process? The next few pages are presented to give you an overview of the entire merit badge process, from the time a Scout decides to work on a merit badge to the time when he completes the merit badge. By the way, the requirements for each merit badge appear in the current BSA merit badge pamphlet for that award and in the current edition of the Boy Scout Requirements book, available at Scout shops and council service centers. A good merit badge counselor will always have the current requirements on hand. NEXT PREV

47 What is the Merit Badge Process? When a Scout has decided on a merit badge he would like to earn, he obtains from his Scoutmaster the name and phone number of the district/council-approved merit badge counselor. At this time, the Scoutmaster also issues the Scout a signed Application for Merit Badge (blue card). NEXT PREV

48 What is the Merit Badge Process? The Scout telephones the merit badge counselor to make an appointment, and together they schedule a date and time for the Scout and his buddy to meet. The counselor suggests that the Scout bring the merit badge pamphlet, the Application for Merit Badge, and any work that he has started or accomplished, and that he prepare by reading over the requirements. NEXT PREV

49 What is the Merit Badge Process? At their first meeting, the merit badge counselor and the Scout decide upon a tentative schedule for completing the requirements. They should keep the Scout's other obligations (Scouting, school, worship, etc.) in mind, and set the dates, times, and locations for future meetings. The counselor will explain the requirements for the badge and help the Scout plan ways to fulfill these requirements so that he can get the most out of the experience. NEXT PREV

50 What is the Merit Badge Process? Merit badge counselors help Scouts meet the requirements for the merit badge. They may expand on the information in the merit badge pamphlet based on their knowledge, experience, and expertise in the subject. They are encouraged to tell about their own experiences that positively reinforce the subject matter, but new requirements or additional work may not be added. The Scout is expected to meet the requirements for the merit badge as stated—no more and no less. NEXT PREV

51 What is the Merit Badge Process? The number of counseling sessions will depend on the difficulty of the merit badge requirements and the Scout's preparation and ability. The Scout and counselor are expected to meet as many times as is necessary for the Scout to complete the requirements for the merit badge. The advancement program allows the Scout to move ahead in his own way and at his own pace. Rather than competing against others, he challenges himself to go as far as his ambition will carry him. The rate of advancement depends upon his interest, effort, and ability. NEXT PREV

52 What is the Merit Badge Process? As the Scout completes each requirement, he is always tested (but with a buddy present), and as each requirement is completed, the merit badge counselor marks it on the application. When all the requirements for the merit badge are fulfilled, the merit badge counselor certifies that the Scout has completed the requirements. The Scout returns his completed Application for Merit Badge (blue card) to his Scoutmaster or unit advancement chair. NEXT PREV

53 What is the Merit Badge Process? As you may have gathered from the process, most of the responsibility is on the Scout, from deciding to work on a merit badge, to contacting a counselor, to working on the requirements, to letting his leader know he is done. The responsibility of the counselor is to help the Scout meet the requirements for the merit badge. Many Scouts have based their future hobbies or jobs on what they learned from working on a merit badge. NEXT PREV

54 Counseling Techniques The most productive environment for the Scout when he meets with his merit badge counselor will be one in which he feels welcome and relaxed. Start the conversation by finding out what the Scout already knows about the subject, then stimulate his interest by showing him something related to it. (Be careful not to overwhelm the Scout—remember, he's probably a beginner.) Establish an atmosphere that encourages the Scout to ask questions and to ask for help when he needs it. NEXT PREV

55 Counseling Techniques Spend some time helping the Scout learn the requirements, making sure he knows he should do exactly what the requirements call for, whether "show" or "demonstrate," "make," "list," "discuss," or "collect, identify, and label." Take a genuine interest in his projects, and encourage him to complete them. NEXT PREV

56 Counseling Techniques Remember that the requirements must be completed exactly as presented—do not expand any requirement. However, the Scout may undertake more activities on his own initiative. The merit badge counselor can encourage this without pushing him off course. NEXT PREV

57 Counseling Techniques Encourage the Scout to practice for his review session and to reflect on his accomplishments. The review process might be approached by the Scout with some apprehension. He is familiar with final exams in school and may see this meeting with the counselor as another such experience. NEXT PREV

58 Counseling Techniques The counselor can help by talking to him rather than grilling or examining him—there's a big difference, yet it still will be evident what he knows. Expressing honest enthusiasm for the things he has done will give the Scout confidence. During testing, the merit badge counselor may find that the Scout needs help learning a particular area. The counselor teaches the needed skill, and then retests to ensure the area has been learned. NEXT PREV

59 Fast Facts for the Merit Badge Counselor A merit badge counselor can counsel any Scout, including his own son—although this is discouraged in order to offer a Scout the chance to meet a diverse group of outstanding adults. A counselor may be certified in unlimited merit badge subjects, but he or she must be approved for each one. There is no limit on the number of merit badges that a counselor may counsel with one Scout. However, the Scout will benefit the most from working with a variety of outstanding adults. NEXT PREV

60 Fast Facts for the Merit Badge Counselor A merit badge counselor may limit his or her services to one unit but still must be approved by the council advancement committee. Scoutmasters and assistant Scoutmasters are not automatically approved as merit badge counselors. Group instruction is acceptable, but each Scout must be tested and passed individually. There is no time limit for completion of merit badges, but all work on merit badges must be completed before the Scout's 18th birthday. NEXT PREV

61 Summer Camp Merit Badge Counselors The same qualifications and rules for apply to counselors for council summer camp merit badge programs. All counselors must be 18 years or older, but qualified camp staff members under age 18 may assist the merit badge counselor with instruction. (These assistants are not qualified to sign off on a Scout's blue card nor may they certify the Scout's completion of a merit badge.) NEXT PREV

62 Summer Camp Merit Badge Counselors As always, each counselor must maintain the exact standards as outlined in the merit badge requirements—nothing deleted, nothing added. Partial completion of merit badges at summer camp should be credited to a Scout on the Application for Merit Badge (blue card) and given to his Scoutmaster at the end of the week. NEXT PREV

63 Quiz Grab another piece of paper and a pencil and take a final quiz. Just like the first quiz, this one has twelve questions. Click Next when you are ready to start. NEXT PREV

64 A merit badge counselor may be a counselor for only up to six merit badges. True False False. A counselor may be approved for as many badges as he or she is qualified. Since this is up to the members of the approving body to decide, they also may decide how many merit badges they feel it is necessary for a counselor to coach based upon need within the district or council. Question 1 of 12 NEXT PREV

65 Question 2 of 12 A merit badge counselor may not coach his own son or close relative (i.e., nephew) unless he is part of a group of Scouts all working on the same merit badge. True False False. A duly approved counselor may counsel any Scout who contacts him or her through proper procedures. However, it is suggested that wherever possible, Scouts should experience a variety of adult contacts and therefore, should use a diverse group of counselors. NEXT PREV

66 Question 3 of 12 A merit badge counselor who works only with a single unit needs only the unit committee’s approval before being approved by the Scout executive. True False False. All counselors must be approved by the district/council advancement committee. Also, a merit badge counselor is a district level position and thus will be made available to all units. NEXT PREV

67 Question 4 of 12 Persons serving as merit badge counselors must be registered as a merit badge counselor with the Boy Scouts of America. True False True. Even volunteers who serve in multiple positions must fill out another form and show registration as a merit badge counselor. NEXT PREV

68 Question 5 of 12 A Scout may earn no more than five merit badges from the same merit badge counselor. True False False. A Scout may earn as many badges from a counselor as the counselor is qualified and approved to coach. However, since it is in the Scout’s best interest that he experience a diversity of adult contacts, it is not in the spirit of the program to do so unless conditions warrant. NEXT PREV

69 Question 6 of 12 Once a Scouter is approved as a merit badge counselor, he is approved for life and never has to be reapproved. True False False. Counselor approvals are for one year only. NEXT PREV

70 Question 7 of 12 A Scout must complete all the requirements for a merit badge within 12 months or he must start over. True False False. There is no time limit except that all requirements work must be completed before the Scout’s 18th birthday. NEXT PREV

71 Question 8 of 12 A merit badge counselor may require the Scout to work beyond the specific requirements of the merit badge so he may discover more about the subject and continue the learning process. True False False. No additions or deletions are permitted. The requirements are to be completed exactly as written. However, a counselor may share additional information or resources in the hope of encouraging the Scout to challenge himself. NEXT PREV

72 Question 9 of 12 Due to the BSA policies related to Youth Protection and two-deep leadership, a merit badge counselor must have another adult present during all merit badge counseling sessions. True False False. There must always be a third person present, but it may be any other adult familiar to the Scout, a Scout’s parent, or a Scout’s “buddy.” Common sense dictates that two adult counselors alone with only one Scout should be avoided. NEXT PREV

73 Question 10 of 12 If the weather, locale, or some other condition makes meeting all of the conditions of the merit badge requirements impractical, the merit badge counselor may substitute requirements for those stated for the merit badge. True False False. No additions or deletions are permitted. The requirements are to be completed exactly as written. NEXT PREV

74 Question 11 of 12 Merit badge counselors must be at least 18 years old. True False True. NEXT PREV

75 Question 12 of 12 If the requirements for a merit badge differ between the merit badge pamphlet and the current edition of Boy Scout Requirements, the requirements in the Boy Scout Requirements book supersede all others. True False True. The Boy Scout Requirements book is revised annually and reflects any changes that have been made, whereas the merit badge pamphlets are not revised annually and may be outdated. NEXT PREV

76 Quiz Results Compare your answers with the test you took at the beginning of this training. Did you get more right the second time? NEXT PREV

77 Merit Badge Counselor Resources Adult Application, No This adult registration form consists of a cover sheet, an instruction and information sheet, and a four-part registration form. It is used for all BSA volunteers, including merit badge counselors. Completion of the form is required of all merit badge counselors regardless of whether they are already a registered Scouter, and for each position the volunteer would like to serve. NEXT PREV

78 Merit Badge Counselor Resources Advancement Committee Policies and Procedures, No This is the handbook for Scouters responsible for advancement at the council, district, and unit levels. It contains the current BSA advancement policies, procedures, rules, and regulations as well as other information. NEXT PREV

79 Merit Badge Counselor Resources Application for Merit Badge (commonly known as the “blue card”), No This three-panel, blue wallet-sized card shows that the Scout has permission to start working on a particular merit badge; records his progress; and, when completed, provides a separate record for the Scout, the counselor, and the unit. NEXT PREV

80 Merit Badge Counselor Resources Boy Scout Handbook, No This is the critical document for a Scout, providing the basic information for all facets of Scouting, including a chapter on the merit badge program. NEXT PREV

81 Merit Badge Counselor Resources Boy Scout Requirements, No Updated yearly, this book contains the complete, official requirements for all BSA merit badges, ranks, and special awards. Requirements in this publication may be more current than the merit badge pamphlet; therefore, the Boy Scout Requirements takes precedence. The complete book is available online. NEXT PREV

82 Merit Badge Counselor Resources A Guide for Merit Badge Counseling, No This folder gives potential merit badge counselors an introduction to the advancement program and the merit badge counselor’s role. It also lists all the current merit badge subjects. NEXT PREV

83 Merit Badge Counselor Resources Merit Badge Counselor Information form, No When attached to the Adult Application, this document specifies the merit badge subjects a counselor wants to coach and secures the counselor’s agreement to follow the merit badge requirements and BSA policies. NEXT PREV

84 Merit Badge Counselor Resources Scoutmaster Handbook, No As the Scoutmaster’s primary guide, the Scoutmaster Handbook contains a section on the merit badge program that includes tips on recruiting counselors and other advancement resources. NEXT PREV

85 Merit Badge Counselor Resources Merit Badge Pamphlet Series The merit badge pamphlets are written for Scout-age boys. The information presented in the pamphlet will help the counselor understand what the Scout may be studying and the level of learning expected by the Boy Scouts of America. The pamphlets may also contain suggestions for projects or demonstrations that may stimulate the counselor’s ideas. At times, the requirements presented in the merit badge pamphlet may not match those in the current edition of the Boy Scout Requirements book. The Boy Scout Requirements criteria take precedence. NEXT PREV

86 Merit Badge Counselor Resources Merit Badge Pamphlet Series, continued Once a Scout has started working on a merit badge, he may stay with the requirements in effect when he started and is not required to meet newly introduced changes unless the national office places a specific timeline on the implementation of new requirements. NEXT PREV

87 Merit Badge Counselor Resources Note: Many of the resources in this section are available on line or have more detail at formeritbadgecounselors/resources.aspx NEXT PREV

88 That’s It! You have completed the Merit Badge Counselor Training. You have only one step to complete the training. Send a note to the council training chair, Dan Savage, at to let him know you have completed this training. A record of your completion will be sent to the Council Office. Please complete the Youth Protection Training at your earliest convenience if you have not done so already. Once you have completed both trainings please contact the Everett Office to confirm that we have received your records.


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