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Boy Scout Troop 299 Dublin, OH

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1 Boy Scout Troop 299 Dublin, OH
4/4/2006 Boy Scout Troop 299 Dublin, OH Super Scout Parent Orientation 2012 Presented by Jim Schrock Troop Committee Member This presentation takes a hour if done quickly. The intention is to convey some key differences between Cub Scouts/Webelos and Boy Scouts. It also mentions key Boy Scouting terms so the parent has heard them at least once – If the parents know the lingo they can communicate with their new Scout more easily. All parents should already have a packet with a considerable amount of information in it. Stress that you are not covering that same information here, though you might occasionally mention what is in that packet as a reminder to read it. You might bring along a bowl, spork, and wide mouth Nalgene to show what is needed for utensils. Having a Scout’s binder on hand can also be helpful. IRUMC’s Celebration Wing works well for this presentation. Arrange the chairs to be as close-in as possible. The Committee Members who will be helping with paperwork should be off to the side, out of the way. Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

2 Agenda Aims and Methods The Patrol Method Advancement Outdoor Program
4/4/2006 Agenda Aims and Methods The Patrol Method Advancement Outdoor Program Get Started! Paperwork… Plus Q&A and Back to Basics… The BSA’s Aims are the same across all BSA Youth programs; however, the methods vary from Cub Scouts to Boy Scouts so we’ll very briefly mention all of them. We’ll go into a bit more depth of the key differences: The Patrol Method, Advancement, and Outdoor Program. Along the way we’ll mention things like Uniforming and Adult Interaction. We’ll also discuss some more immediately useful information about their first campout, Back to Basics; a word about summer camp (hopefully from the ASM in charge of that event so they can see his face), and time to complete registration paperwork at the end. Troop Dublin, OH Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

3 4/4/2006 BSA Aims and Methods Scouting aims to develop Character, Citizenship, Personal Fitness Using the 8 Methods of Boy Scouting Ideals of Scout Oath, Law, Motto Patrol Method Outdoor Program Advancement Association with Adults Personal Growth Leadership Development Uniform The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law. The program aims to develop strong personal character, citizenship, as well as personal fitness. The latter is of increasing importance to our youth and the BSA National organization is increasing the emphasis on being fit. Each of the 8 methods of scouting are all directed at fulfilling one or more aspects of the Mission. Oath and Law: Every Scout repeats the Oath and Law at each meeting. What it means to them will change with time, experiences, and age and is represented in the Personal Growth Patrol Method: This is the core of Boy Scouts and differences appreciably from Cub Scouts in that the Scouts are in charge, not adults. We will talk more about this in the next section Outdoor Program and Leadership: It is said that Boy Scouting is a leadership development program wrapped in outdoor experiences. It is key to the Boy Scouting program so we’re going to spend more time on with it. Adult Interaction: I like to point out that I know of no other organization for youth that has as a core technique “Association with Adults”. Scouting challenges our sons to learn to speak up for themselves, to participate, and to be comfortable talking with adults on things that matter to themselves. It is built into the advancement program. Advancement: Big differences and the final payout – Eagle Scout – is prominent. Yet, Advancement as a Method of Scouting is just 1 of 8 Methods (and though there is no order to the Methods I’ve never seen advancement listed first). We’re definitely spending some time on this. Troop Dublin, OH Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

4 BSA Aims and Methods But Scouts just want FUN!
4/4/2006 BSA Aims and Methods But Scouts just want FUN! Scouting promises the outdoors Learn & practice outdoor skills Camping, hiking, shooting, swimming, skiing, canoeing, biking, and much more! But Scouts just want to have fun! Troop Dublin, OH Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

5 4/4/2006 The Patrol Method “The patrol system is not one method in which Scouting for boys can be carried on. It is the only method” - Lord Baden Powell The quote from the founder of Boy Scouting is often repeated – “The patrol system is not one method in which Scouting for boys can be carried on. It is the only method.” And since it was the founder of Scouting that said this we need to take it very seriously. After a very short time, any Scout in Troop 299 when asked “Who is in charge of your troop/outing?” should say that it’s his Patrol Leader (PL) or Senior Patrol Leader (SPL). If he responds with Scoutmaster or any other adult then we – the Scouters and Parents – are not delivering Scouting. Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

6 The Patrol Method Patrol Leaders’ Council (PLC)
4/4/2006 Patrol - 6 to 8 boys age Patrol Leader elected by scouts - PL appoints assistants - Plans outing meals, tenting - Works together on advancement Senior Patrol Leader - Elected by all scouts - Runs all meetings & outings - Chairs Patrol Leaders Council Appoints assistants Patrol Leaders’ Council - Plans & runs troop’s program Holds annual planning meeting Meets monthly (last Tuesday) Chaired by SPL Indian Run United Methodist - Includes Scouting in its program - Meeting, storage space - Approves adult leaders - Owns all troop assets District, Council, National - BSA provides training, program Troop Parents’ Committee - Supports the troop Recruits, trains adult leaders Approves all rank advancement - Handles membership, funds - Fundraising opportunities for PLC - Meets monthly – all welcome! Scoutmaster - Trains & guides the boy leaders - Uses Methods to bring scouting to the boys - Assisted by many adults - BSA trained The Patrol Method Troop Parents’ Committee IRUMC Darby Creek District Simon Kenton Council BSA National Council Scoutmaster (SM) Junior Assistant Scoutmaster (JASM) Assistant Scoutmaster (ASM) Patrol Leaders’ Council (PLC) Senior Patrol Leader (SPL) ASPL [ Troop 299 normally uses New Scout Patrols until about September. But sometimes and depending on the make-up of the incoming new Scouts it makes more sense to distribute the new scouts into existing patrols. Find out if there will be New Scout Patrols this year and work that information into this discussion ] The business slide…. An Org Chart It all begins with your Scout. Patrols are small groups of Scouts who camp together, cook together, play together, and learn together. Patrols sort of look like Cub Scout dens, but there is one big difference: Patrols are where Scouts learn citizenship at the most basic level because they elect one of their own to be Patrol Leader (PL). PLs are elected to 6 month terms and can serve as many times as they are elected to. Through their Patrol Leaders, Scouts have a voice in deciding what activities the troop will put on its calendar. Patrols are one component of what we call youth-run, or youth-led, troop. Patrol Leaders can appoint and assign duties. They always assign an Assistant Patrol Leader (APL) to fill-in if necessary. Troop 299 has 4 standing patrols (two shown here). [ Talk about new scout patrols here if appropriate ] The Senior Patrol Leader (SPL) is elected at-large by the all of the scouts. He is responsible for planning all Troop Meetings and Outings. He does not do this alone: He can also appoint assistants to Positions of Responsibility: Quartermaster, Scribe, etc. The SPL also appoints Assistant Senior Patrol Leaders – ASPL – to assist him and to fill in should he be absent. The SPL leverages the Patrol Leaders to carry out the program. The elected leaders comprise the Patrol Leader’s Council (PLC). The PLC is the program planning and execution component of the troop. It is chaired by the SPL and attended by the Scoutmaster, who provides guidance, ensures activities comply with Scouting requirements and meet Scouting’s aims. He runs all troop meetings and monthly outings. Holding elected office or a Position of Responsibility is required for rank advancement above First Class [more on that later]. The PLC meets during the summer to layout a year’s worth of monthly activities. Then they meet each month to plan each activity in more detail. For instance, they may make arrangements for training needed to safely carry out the upcoming outing. There is a reason why the SPL is shown in the middle of this chart … He is in charge. Ah, the first Adult. The Scoutmaster (SM). This person’s fundamental job is to be a coach and mentor to the Senior Patrol Leader, as well as the other elected scouts sitting on the PLC. Of course, he is also charged with ensuring that the PLC operates within BSA parameters. He spends a lot of time with the SPL. The Scoutmaster also has assistants, ASMs, to help the Scouts carry out their program. Some have been with the troop for many years and have specialties, such as being NRA certified. Others help mentor some of the scouts holding Positions of Responsibility, like the Quartermaster. One very important ASM is the Outing Coordinator, who does things the Scouts are not able to do like make deposits on campsites, check driver information, etc. The SM, ASM, SPL, PL, all run the “Program Side” of the Troop. Supporting them is the Troop Committee. These adults are registered Scouters – though we encourage all parents to attend the monthly meetings. Together, the select Scouters, manage the troop bank accounts, and help in anyway the Scoutmaster needs. In a huge difference from Boy Scouts, Committee Members play a vital role in Rank Advancement – they actually review the scouts (that Adult Interaction thing) and approve all rank advancement. If you don’t see yourself going on Outings then seriously consider becoming a Committee Member. Beyond the troop committee are a variety of other helpful resources. IRUMC charters this troop. They provided this meeting space, storage space for the troop’s gear, and the own everything. The District, Council, and National organizations provide vital resources such as Scout and Scouter training, and camps. For now, that’s sufficient… Step back and observe that the word “Parent” is no where on this diagram. You might even challenge them to find that work anywhere in the Scout Handbook. Hmmmm. Quartermaster Scribe Patrol Leader (PL) “Chinchilla” Patrol Leader (PL) “Evergreen” Chaplain’s Aide Historian Den Chief OA Rep APL APL Scouts Scouts Troop Dublin, OH Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

7 The Patrol Method www.troop299skc.org 4/4/2006
Senior Patrol Leader - Elected by all scouts - Runs all meetings & outings - Chairs Patrol Leaders Council Appoints assistants Patrol - 6 to 8 boys age Patrol Leader elected by scouts - PL appoints assistants - Plans outing meals, tenting - Works together on advancement Troop Parents’ Committee - Supports the troop - Recruits, trains adult leaders - Approves all rank advancement - Handles membership, funds - Fundraising opportunities - Meets monthly – all welcome! Scoutmaster -Trains & guides the boy leaders - Uses Methods to bring scouting to the boys - Assisted by many adults - BSA trained New Scout Patrol - Helps new scouts adjust, learn - Works together thru first summer - Assisted by Troop Guide Indian Run United Methodist - Includes Scouting in its program - Meeting, storage space - Approves adult leaders - Owns all troop assets District, Council, National - BSA provides training, program This slide exists only for printouts. It shows all of the overlay pieces from the previous OrgChart slide. Patrol Leaders’ Council - Plans & runs troop’s program - Holds annual planning meeting - Meets monthly (last Tuesday) - Chaired by SPL Troop Dublin, OH Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

8 The Patrol Method Troop Program Leaders
4/4/2006 The Patrol Method Troop Program Leaders Senior Patrol Leader (SPL) Pranav K Scoutmaster Chris S Outdoor Coordinator Kent M … and the elected Patrol Leaders Some of the more visible troop leaders. 2012: Hid because of time constraints. Troop Dublin, OH Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

9 4/4/2006 Advancement “A badge is recognition of what a Scout is able to do, not merely a reward for what he has done” - Lord Baden Powell Advancement Big difference here. In Cub Scouts/Webelos the Scout is recognized and rewards largely for his participation – Going to See It and Doing His Best. However, In Boy Scouts, the Scout must demonstrate mastery of each requirement – He is tested on what he can do. It is also vitally important to recognize that the only time limit in Boy Scouts is his 18th birthday. Ranks are locked to neither age nor grade. The Scout himself sets his own pace…. Some will rocket through the first several ranks then slow down a little. Some finally become motivated a few years later (Giving the leaders and his parents much stress along the way!) Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

10 Advancement 1 of 8 Methods of Scouting
4/4/2006 Advancement 1 of 8 Methods of Scouting Encourages boys to meet challenges Natural outcome of participation in activities Active participation in patrol & troop is required The scout sets his own pace! Boy Scouting has a system of ranks in which Scouts learn progressively more difficult skills and take on progressively greater responsibilities. The highest of these ranks is Eagle Scout. Becoming an Eagle Scout is an important achievement that your son can be proud of his entire life. But turning out Eagle Scouts is not what the Boy Scouting program is all about. Advancement is probably the most visible of the Boy Scouting methods, and the easiest to understand, but it is only one of eight methods. We strongly encourage advancement, but we never force it—advancement is the Scout's choice, and he sets his own pace. We don't do "lock-step" advancement. And many great Scouts, and great men, never became Eagle Scouts. I am highlighting advancement because it is significantly different than in Cub Scouts. No timetable. Individual effort applied to a group Advancement is but one of eight different methods of scouting, Notice carefully that Advancement Is Not An Aim of Scouting! The scout must set his own pace The Boy Scout advancement program is designed in concert with boys’ development and maturity. The Scout who participates in troop meetings and outings will advance naturally as part of the program. For example, a Scout cannot teach someone how to tie a knot until he has perfected it himself. And he will not be an effective leader until he has first mastered being led. If adults push advancement the boy will cease to have fun, rebel, and leave. Sometimes, advancement takes several years AND THAT’S OKAY! Troop Dublin, OH Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

11 Advancement The Boy Scout Ranks Boy Scout
4/4/2006 Advancement The Boy Scout Ranks Boy Scout Scout Oath & Law, joining requirements Tenderfoot Second Class First Class Develop outdoor skills and abilities Community service Demonstrate Scout Oath, Law in daily life Scout Rank – Similar to the Bobcat rank in Cub Scouts. Means that the boy has completed basic joining requirements. Most are completed as a Webelo II. Tenderfoot, 2nd Class, and 1st Class are focused on learning basic outdoor skills. When complete, the boy should be capable outdoorsman. He can participate in all Scouting activities (except where there’s an age restriction). First Class – Used to be the highest Boy Scout rank. In Troop 299 The First Class Scout can (with the Scoutmaster’s approval) sign off on rank requirements below his; he can be elected and/or appointed to hold patrol and troop leadership positions. If he’s also old enough he becomes eligible for summertime high adventure outings. Star, Life and Eagle – These are positions of leadership. The requirements include serving his Troop by holding positions of Leadership and Responsibility. Service outside of Scouting is mandatory. The completion of a combination of elective and Eagle Required Merit Badges is required. Rank requirements are approved by the Scoutmaster. The meanings of the Scout Oath and Law become engrained into he Scout’s character. Star Life Eagle (with palms) Merit Badge completion Leadership Positions of Responsibility Community service Demonstrate Scout Oath, Law in daily life Troop Dublin, OH Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

12 Advancement Advancement is a 4 step process
4/4/2006 Advancement Advancement is a 4 step process A Scout learns by instruction and by doing A Scout is tested by experienced scouts, who sign-off on skills requirements A Scout is reviewed Scoutmaster Conference Board of Review A Scout is recognized with praise, rank advancement, and publicly at Court of Honor Pretty much as the slide says Troop Dublin, OH Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

13 Advancement Merit Badges Over 120 ways to explore!
4/4/2006 Advancement Merit Badges Over 120 ways to explore! Summer camp is a great place to begin Scout asks Scoutmaster for Blue Card Scoutmaster assigns a counselor (MBC) Required for Star, Life, Eagle ranks Can be worked at any time [ Have some merit badge books available ] Our troop is fortunate to have counselors for every Merit Badge required for Eagle Volunteers Are Needed! Troop Dublin, OH Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

14 www.troop299skc.org Scouting promises you the great outdoors…
4/4/2006 Outdoor Program Scouting promises you the great outdoors… Outdoor Program It is said that Boy Scouting is a leadership development program wrapped in an outdoor experience. If the troop and patrol meetings are the classroom then the outdoors is the laboratory. [Until the 2010 edition, the quote was the very first sentence of the Boy Scout Handbook.] Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

15 Outdoor Program Outdoors is where Scouting works best!
4/4/2006 Outdoor Program Outdoors is where Scouting works best! Real-life challenges & triumphs PLC plans one each month Usually involves camping 2 nights Patrol Method Applied Patrols plan, prepare, eat, clean, and tent together Fun competitions SPL and Scoutmaster are in charge Adults belong to the Raven Patrol Adults do everything the same way the scouts do it Pretty much as the slide states. Keep things positive, of course. However, in recent years it has become increasingly necessary to stress the 3rd bullet point to parents. Stay out of the Scout’s way!! Allow their elected leaders to lead. Allow the Scoutmaster to coach. Adults abide by the same rules as the Scouts. Troop Dublin, OH Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

16 Outdoor Program Logistics
4/4/2006 Outdoor Program Logistics Sign-up at troop meetings - permission slip, fees Medical forms must be current Scouts bring (or share) tent, sleeping bag and pad, utensils Patrols bring stoves, pots, etc. Pay grubmaster promptly Money for meals on the road Travel in Class-A Drivers always appreciated Health forms are REQUIRED. No major problems, yet, but minors do occur Without a current, signed form, getting treatment is nearly impossible Your scout needs to learn not to stiff his Grubmaster. He needs to learn to ask what he owes if not asked. When your son is the Grubmaster, help him to figure out quantities (he should know or find out how many are attending), be aware of costs and budgets but always remember that the menu was planned by his patrol so do not change it!! Troop Dublin, OH Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

17 Outdoor Program Summer Camp A must this summer!
4/4/2006 Outdoor Program Summer Camp A must this summer! Camp Conestoga Laurel Hill State Park, PA Pathfinder for new scouts Earn first merit badges Details forthcoming Summer Camp – Do It! New Scouts who participate in Summer Camp are far more likely to remain in the program because they develop friendships and a far better sense of what the program is all about. Emphasize that there will be a summer camp specific meeting in the near future. Emphasize that reserving a spot now is important to ensure the discounted rate. If the ASM in charge of this year’s Summer Camp is present ask him to come up for a brief chat. If someone already has a commitment for the dates, give them some encouragement that there are other opportunities. More than likely, there is at least one other scout in the same situation. Might even be able to have a second summer camp (as the troop did for many years). Troop Dublin, OH Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

18 Outdoor Program High Adventure
4/4/2006 Outdoor Program High Adventure Keeps older boys interested, active, learning Summertime 1-2 week back-country May be age, rank restrictions -- incentive! BSA High Adventures include Philmont, Seabase, and Northern Tier Must be First Class, age 14, and have Scoutmaster’s permission Troop High Adventures have included canoeing in Canada, hiking Glacier and Mt. Washington, pedaling the C&O trail to Washington D.C., and others. Age requirement is often lower or eliminated depending on the outing. Troop Dublin, OH Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

19 - BSA Parent Orientation Trainer Notes
4/4/2006 Get Started! “We just have to remember that our business as adults is not the same as the business of the Scouts. It is up to them to get things done. It is up to us to make sure they have what they need, but (within the bounds of health and safety) not what they do with it.“ - BSA Parent Orientation Trainer Notes I'd like to come back a moment to the youth-led concept of Boy Scouting. As I mentioned before, it is different than how Cub Scouting works, and it is different from the way a lot of youth activities are run, where the adults decide what to do and the youth do it. Boy Scouting is different and it is sometimes difficult for adults to realize that we have a different role and a different goal. In Cub Scouting and in many other programs, our goal is to have fun activities and generate achievements. Our role is to make sure that the activities happen, that the achievements take place. Boy Scouting is different. In Boy Scouting, the role of the boys is to have fun activities and generate achievements. The role of the adults is not the destination, but the journey. That is, our responsibility as adults is to promote the "process" of Scouting. What is important for us is Not the food on the campout, but that the boys cooked it. Not a sharp-looking flag ceremony, but that the boys put it together. Not who would make the best patrol leader, but that the boys elect one. Not that Johnny learns first aid, but that Billy teaches him. Not that we cover everything on the meeting agenda, but that the senior patrol leader is in charge. Our goal is not to get things done, but to create a safe and healthy environment with the training and resources that the Scouts need, and then let them do it. It can be a very messy business, and painful to watch. Meetings where the boy leaders are in charge can be very chaotic. And it can be very tempting for adults to jump in and sort things out, because that is what adults do. But we have to remember that that is the process of Scouting. That is how they learn—even from disorganization and failure. We just have to remember that our business as adults is not the same as the business of the boys. It is up to them to get things done. It is up to us to make sure they have what they need, but (within the bounds of health and safety) not what they do with it. – BSA Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

20 Get Started! Help your scout apply the Scout Oath and Law daily
4/4/2006 Get Started! Help your scout apply the Scout Oath and Law daily Ask him to teach you the Scout Oath and Law Create opportunities to practice at home Pitch a tent, pack his gear, read maps, cook, wash clothes, … Help him learn to participate in his Patrol and Troop Encourage him to seek answers from the scouts in his patrol Ask your Scout a lot of questions Allow the Scouts to run their meetings and outings Scouts elected their leaders… (and none are adults!) As stated in the slide. Troop Dublin, OH Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

21 Always Keep Scouting Fun!
4/4/2006 Get Started! Get a notebook, a bag for gear, uniform, handbook And help him learn to keep track of it himself Help him earn Scout Rank Complete “How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse” You may initial and date Encourage him to contact the Scoutmaster for a Scout Rank Conference Encourage earning Tenderfoot Ask him (often!) when he wants to start the 30-day fitness requirement Attend all meetings, outings and summer camp Always Keep Scouting Fun! Troop Dublin, OH Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

22 Get Started! Dues and fundraising help cover Scout Accounts
4/4/2006 Get Started! Dues and fundraising help cover BSA registration fee and “Boy’s Life” Awards, troop gear, scout & adult leader training, etc. Scout Accounts A portion of each fundraiser is earmarked to the scout Kroger Cards Organization #81985 Send card numbers and owner names to {the Treasurer} Annual Popcorn Sale Still the most pop for the time and dollar Other fund raisers as the PLC decides Troop Committee assists with options Troop Dublin, OH Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

23 Get Started! Join the Raven Patrol! Asst Scoutmaster Troop Committee
4/4/2006 Get Started! Join the Raven Patrol! Asst Scoutmaster Troop Committee Merit Badge Counselor Driver Troop Dublin, OH Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

24 4/4/2006 Get Started! Above all, Make time for Scouting! Scouting is fun and worthwhile in so many ways, but only if your son is there Troop Dublin, OH Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

25 4/4/2006 Reference All meetings at IRUMC Fellowship Hall, 7:00PM (unless otherwise announced) Every Tuesday Except last Tuesday of each month Troop Meetings Patrol Leaders’ Council (PLC) Last Tuesday of the month 3rd Thursday of each month. Boards of review as necessary. All adults welcome! Troop Parents’ Committee Patrol meetings As scheduled by each patrol Court of Honor Quarterly as announced, often in lieu of a regular troop meeting Troop Dublin, OH Troop 299 Super Scout Parent

26 This presentation is based on material from official BSA sources:
4/4/2006 Reference This presentation is based on material from official BSA sources: The Boy Scout Handbook The Scoutmaster Handbook Boy Scout Leader Fast Start Training We encourage you to learn more about the Boy Scout program by visiting these official websites BSA National Website BSA Online Training Simon Kenton Council Troop 299 Advancement Committee Guide The Troop Committee Guide BSA National Website Troop Dublin, OH Troop 299 Super Scout Parent


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