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© 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer. This PowerPoint.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer. This PowerPoint."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer. This PowerPoint is available in alternative formats upon request. Direct requests to XXX-XXX-XXXX. Promoting Participation of Older Youth Rebecca N. Saito Youth Work institute James Howard

2 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. WHO IS HERE?  Type of Organization  Your Role—Staff or Volunteer or?  Why you signed up for this workshop? What do you want to know/discuss?  Who am I?

3 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. AGENDA  Introductions & Background  What is “Normal” Adolescent Development?  Engaging Older Youth: Theory and Practice  Discussion, Q & A

4 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. BASIC YOUTH NEEDS  Feel a sense of safety and structure.  Experience active participation, group membership and belonging.  Develop self-worth through meaningful contribution.  Experiment to discover self, gain independence and gain control over one’s life.  Develop significant quality relationships with peers and adults.  Discuss conflicting values and form their own.  Feel pride of competence and mastery.  Expand capacity to enjoy life and know that success is possible. Adapted from Konopka, G. (1973). Requirements for healthy development of adolescent youth. Adolescence 8(31), Pittman, K.J. and Wright, M. (1991). A rationale for enhancing the role of the non-school voluntary sector in youth development. (Commissioned for the Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development) Washington, DC: Center for Youth Development and Policy Research

5 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. ENGAGING OLDER YOUTH  2 Studies of Youth Engagement  Rings of Engagement (Sullivan & Saito, 2010)  Engaging Older Youth (HFRP, 2010)

6 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.

7 EFFECTIVE OST PROGRAMS…  Provide opportunities for leadership  Meet the developmental needs of older youth  Promote supportive relationship  Exhibit effective group management Engaging Older Youth: Program and City-level Strategies to Support Sustained Participation in Out-of- School Time, Sarah N. Deschenes, Amy Arbreton, Priscilla M. Little, Carla Herrera, Jean Baldwin Grossman, Heather B. Weiss, with Diana Lee, Harvard Family Research Project, 2010

8 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. UNDERSTAND WHAT ADOLESCENTS NEED AND WANT  Tier 1: Novelty and exploration: –New ideas, new challenges, new people  Tier 2: Social comfort –Safety, respect, feeling valued  Tier 3: Leadership responsibilities –Providing opinions and idea Engaging Older Youth: Program and City-level Strategies to Support Sustained Participation in Out-of- School Time, Sarah N. Deschenes, Amy Arbreton, Priscilla M. Little, Carla Herrera, Jean Baldwin Grossman, Heather B. Weiss, with Diana Lee, Harvard Family Research Project, 2010

9 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. UNDERSTAND WHAT ADOLESCENTS NEED AND WANT  Youth report they want a program that is sensitive to developmental differences –balance structure and freedom –learning and recreation –safety and opportunity Engaging Older Youth: Program and City-level Strategies to Support Sustained Participation in Out-of- School Time, Sarah N. Deschenes, Amy Arbreton, Priscilla M. Little, Carla Herrera, Jean Baldwin Grossman, Heather B. Weiss, with Diana Lee, Harvard Family Research Project, 2010

10 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. SUPPORTIVE RELATIONSHIPS  Learning about youth culture  Making time to talk  Informal socialization  Keeping informed of youth outside of the program

11 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. RESOURCES  Resources –http://www.mentorri.org/for-mentors.htm rhode Islandhttp://www.mentorri.org/for-mentors.htm –http://www.youthengagement.umn.eduhttp://www.youthengagement.umn.edu –http://www.mpmn.org/ToolsforMentoringAdole scents.aspx with Search Institutehttp://www.mpmn.org/ToolsforMentoringAdole scents.aspx –http://mentoringworks.wordpress.com/2011/0 4/27/making-mentoring-work-for-older-youth/ Mentoring Partnership of MN bloghttp://mentoringworks.wordpress.com/2011/0 4/27/making-mentoring-work-for-older-youth/

12 © 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. DISCUSSION  How do “healthy adolescent development” and engagement research relate to mentoring older youth?  What questions do you have?  What has worked well for you in working with older youth?


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