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TXCC Webinar 7 Instructional Strategies for English Language Learners April 6, 2010.

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Presentation on theme: "TXCC Webinar 7 Instructional Strategies for English Language Learners April 6, 2010."— Presentation transcript:

1 TXCC Webinar 7 Instructional Strategies for English Language Learners April 6, 2010

2 Today’s Objectives: Participants will be able to assist teachers in providing a learning environment that addresses affective and academic needs of English language learners (ELLs) and use training materials to provide professional development for administrators and teachers on incorporating the English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) in content-area instruction. 2

3 Today’s Presenters Georgina González, Program Associate, TXCC Heather Solano, Bilingual Coordinator, Pflugerville ISD 3

4 Webinar Agenda  ELLs in Texas  Affective Components that Influence Learning  Strategies for ELLs  Practice with strategies  Summary and resources  Evaluation 4

5 ELLs in Texas Texas student population: 4.8 million PEIMS, Fall ,074 (16.9%) 456,051 (9.4%) 310,725 (6.4%) ELLs Bilingual ESL 5

6 From Your Perspective Think about a teacher who was a positive influence on you when you were a student. Share with a colleague how that relationship affected your academic performance. Share your experience in the chat pod. 6

7 Affective Component: Experts Believe — Staff need to know individual student characteristics and his/her background and mobility. Home language experiences can contribute to second language (English) literacy development. (August, & Shanahan, 2006; ESC Region 4, n.d.) 7

8 Affective Components that Influence Learning Safe learning environment Respectful Appreciate learners for their work (Krashen, 2002) 8

9 An optimal classroom environment for all learners is one that  promotes openness,  reduces anxiety,  builds confidence,  is respectful of all learners,  builds relationships between students and teacher, and  increases empathy for all learners. Affective Components that Influence Learning 9

10 Participant Input Based on your ESC experience with districts and schools, provide examples of how to address the affective needs of students in the classroom. Please post your responses to the chat pod. 10

11 Considerations for Instruction Listening Speaking Reading Writing 11

12 Considerations for Instruction Beginning Intermediate Advanced Advanced High 12

13 Considerations for Instruction How language domains, proficiency levels, and instructional strategies interact 13

14 Strategies for ELLs Effective Literacy and English Language Instruction for English Language Learners in the Elementary Grades IES Practice Guides: Organizing Instruction and Study to Improve Student Learning 14

15 Strategies for ELLs August, D., & Shanahan, T. (Eds.). (2006). Developing literacy in second-language learners: Report of the National Literacy Panel on Language-Minority Children and Youth. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. and Walqui, A. (2009). Oral language in disciplinary literacy development: The design and implementation of quality teaching for English learners and a large-scale effectiveness study (Slides presented at CREATE Conference). 15

16 Instructional Strategies for ELLs 1.Develop academic language 2.Facilitate regular peer-assisted learning opportunities 3.Use quizzes to re-expose students to key content 16

17 4.Ask questions requiring deep explanations 5.Combine graphical presentations with verbal descriptions 6.Allow opportunities for oral language development Instructional Strategies for ELLs (cont.) 17

18 Review Handouts Handout 1a—Overview of Texas Administrative Code for Education (Title 19) Handout 1b—English Language Proficiency Standards Crosswalk Handout 2—Learning Activity (Weather Lesson) Handout 3—Breakout Room Instructions Handout 4—Resource List 18

19 Screen for Reading Problems and Monitor Progress Assess for reading problems as soon as possible. Provide a targeted intervention. Monitor students progress. Gersten et.al., 2007, pg 9. 19

20 Strategy 1: Develop academic language Provide instructional time to development of academic language Explicitly teach English language in content areas Examples: –Academic vocabulary (“photosynthesis”) –Cognates (“map” = Sp. “mapa”) –False cognates (“exit” not equal to Sp. “éxito”) Gersten et.al., 2007, pg

21 Aligning Instructional Strategies to ELPS Strategy 1: Develop academic language Example of how Strategy 1 aligns with the ELPS: 21 “internalize new … academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities” §74.4 (c)(1)(E)

22 Implementation Strategy 1: Develop academic language Sentence frames— Help students participate in class orally and in writing Can be used in whole group or small group Teacher models in part of sentence; students complete sentence 22

23 Sentence Frame Example If conducting an activity in which students are making predictions or expressing opinions, the following sentence frames might be used: What I predict will happen [during this lab activity/in this text] is that______________________. I respectfully disagree with your [position/prediction]. I believe _________________________. 23

24 Strategy 2: Facilitate regular peer- assisted learning opportunities Must include –heterogeneously grouped students, –a specific structured task with correct and incorrect responses, and –a task that extends regular instruction. Gersten et.al., 2007, pg

25 Aligning Instructional Strategies to ELPS Strategy 2: Facilitate regular peer-assisted learning opportunities Example of how Strategy 2 aligns with the ELPS: 25 “demonstrate listening comprehension... by... collaborating with peers,... commensurate with content and grade-level needs.” §74.4 (c)(2)(I)

26 Implementation Strategy 2: Facilitate regular peer ‑ assisted learning opportunities Use after instruction as alternative to individual seatwork. Example: –Jigsaw 26

27 Participant Input Share examples of peer-assisted learning opportunities 27

28 Strategy 3: Use quizzes to re-expose students to key content Cloze assessment after delayed period of time Short answer Immediate feedback with the correct answer Pashler et.al., 2007, pg

29 Aligning Instructional Strategies to ELPS Strategy 3: Use quizzes to re-expose students to key content Example of how Strategy 3 aligns with the ELPS: 29 “use... content area text, enhance and confirm understanding...” §74.4 (c)(4)(F)

30 Implementation Strategy 3: Use quizzes to re-expose students to key content Administer quizzes between initial instruction and final cumulative test. Quizzes must be closed-book in order for students to recall information actively. 30

31 Strategy 4: Ask questions requiring deep explanations Use instructional prompts that encourage to ask and answer to “deep-level” questions. Questions should facilitate elaboration. 31 Pashler et.al., 2007, pg. 29

32 Aligning Instructional Strategies to ELPS Strategy 4: Ask questions requiring deep explanations Example of how Strategy 4 aligns with the ELPS: 32 “demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading... responding to questions...” §74.4 (c)(4)(G)

33 Implementation Strategy 4: Ask questions requiring deep explanations Try a think-aloud Model when –demonstrating how to solve a problem or conduct a lab activity, –before reading aloud a new text, or –during writing. 33

34 Strategy 5: Combine graphical presentations with verbal description Combine graphical presentations of key processes and procedures with verbal descriptions. 34 Pashler et.al., 2007, pg. 13

35 Aligning Instructional Strategies to ELPS Strategy 5: Combine graphical presentations with verbal description Example of how Strategy 5 aligns with the ELPS: 35 “use pre-reading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations…” §74.4 (c)(4)(D)

36 The following slides contain photographs of teacher and student works created using both linguistic and nonlinguistic representations. 36 Implementation Strategy 5: Combine graphical presentations with verbal descriptions

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42 Strategy 6: Allow opportunities for oral language development Well developed oral proficiency in English associated with English reading and writing Provide opportunities for students to engage in discussions. Focus initially on simple ideas and then grammar. August & Shannahan, 2006; Walqui,

43 Aligning Instructional Strategies to ELPS Strategy 6: Allow opportunities for oral language development Example of how Strategy 6 aligns with the ELPS: 43 “express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics;” §74.4 (c)(3)(G)

44 Implementation Strategy 6: Allow opportunities for oral language development Students need to practice speaking in content- area classes Example: Inside-outside circle 44

45 Breakout Room Activity – Handout 1a—Outline of Texas Administrative Code for Education (Title 19) Handout 1b—English Language Proficiency Standards Crosswalk Handout 2—Learning Activity (Weather Lesson for Grade 2) Handout 3—Breakout Room Instructions 45 What you will need:

46 Read Handout 2 (Learning Activity—Weather Lesson for Grade 2). Modify the weather lesson for ELLs using the assigned strategy, language domain, and proficiency level for your assigned breakout room. Post your modifications in the breakout room chat pod. Respond to prompts from your breakout room facilitator. Breakout Room Activity (10 minutes) 46

47 Breakout Room Sessions 47

48 Participant Input Facilitators, please report on lesson modifications made during the breakout sessions. 48

49 ESC Resources for ELLs Please click the raised hand icon to report verbally on the resources you are currently using with ELLs OR Post your responses to the chat pod 49

50 References August, D., & Shanahan, T. (Eds.). (2006). Developing literacy in second-language learners: Report of the National Literacy Panel on Language-Minority Children and Youth. ESC Region 4. (n.d.). Building Connections in High School Content Areas Through Sheltered Instruction. Kagan, M., Robertson, L., & Kagan, S. (1995). Cooperative Learning Structures for Classbuilding. Kagan San Clemente, CA: Cooperative Learning. Krashen, S. (1989). We acquire vocabulary and spelling by reading: Additional evidence for the input hypothesis. Pashler, H., Bain, P. M., Bottge, B. A., Graesser, A., Koedinger, K., McDaniel, M. et al. (2007, September). Organizing instruction and study to improve student learning. Walqui, A. (2009). Oral language in disciplinary literacy development: The design and implementation of quality teaching for English learners and a large-scale effectiveness study. Gersten, R., Baker, S. K., Shanahan, T., Linan-Thompson, S., Collins, P., & Scarcella, R. (2007). Effective literacy and English language instruction for English learners in the elementary grades. Complete citations for these references can be found on Handout 4, Resource List for Teaching ELLs. 50

51 Important to Remember Affective components that influence learning Considerations for instruction (language domains, proficiency levels) Instructional strategies 51

52 Training Resources Facilitator guide Additional resources material/webinar7/index.html 52

53 Evaluation We appreciate your feedback! Please complete an evaluation form, available at 53

54 Next Webinar Webinar 8 Information: Reducing Dropouts and Increasing Graduation Rates May 18, :00 a.m.–11:00 a.m. Register online at 54

55 Additional Upcoming Webinars Webinar 9: Working Systemically in Action June 8, :00–11:00 a.m. Further information will be posted, as it becomes available, at Archived webinars are available for viewing at 55

56 Thank you for participating! Evaluation link: 56


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