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Ingham Co Schools Professional Development | April 25, 2013 Heather Walker Educational Consultant | Pearson School Achievement Services Digging into the.

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Presentation on theme: "Ingham Co Schools Professional Development | April 25, 2013 Heather Walker Educational Consultant | Pearson School Achievement Services Digging into the."— Presentation transcript:

1 Ingham Co Schools Professional Development | April 25, 2013 Heather Walker Educational Consultant | Pearson School Achievement Services Digging into the Writing Standards with Reading Street 2011

2 Outcomes At the conclusion of this workshop, you will be able to plan appropriate writing prompts and assignments to scaffold students to higher standards apply grade-appropriate instructional strategies that support students in writing opinion/argument and informative/explanatory pieces

3 Agenda Section 1: Opinion and Argument Writing Section 2: Informative/Explanatory Writing Section 3: Narrative Writing Section 4: Integrating Grammar and Writing Instruction Section 5: Review and Closing

4 Writing in the Classroom Activity On page 6 of the Participant Workbook, brainstorm all the formal and informal writing that your students do throughout the year.

5 Opinion and Argument Writing 1 Section 1 Big Questions What does effective opinion and argument writing look like? How can you support opinion writing using Reading Street 2011? #7

6 The Role of Opinion/Argument “While all three text types are important, the Standards put a particular emphasis on students’ ability to write sound arguments on substantive topics and issues, as this ability is critical to college and career readiness.” (Common Core State Standards Initiate 2010b, 24) #7

7 7 Arguments - To convince Definition –A reasoned, logical argument –Demonstrating that the writer’s position, belief, or conclusion is valid Purpose –Change reader’s point of view –Bring about some action on reader’s part –Ask reader to accept writer’s explanation Genre –essay, letter, editorial

8 Foundations of Argument Writing Before students can write sound arguments on substantive topics and issues, we must teach them to… Identify and Introduce topics State opinions Support opinions with reasons Use linking words Provide a concluding statement #8–9

9 Opinion and Argument Writing in Reading Street Activity

10 Writing with Authenticity Form of WritingAudiencePurpose Letter of RequestFamily memberTo share an opinion/To persuade Restaurant ReviewCustomers at local restaurant To share an opinion/To persuade

11 Informative/Explanatory Writing 2 Section 2 Big Questions What does effective informative/explanatory writing look like? How can you support informative/explanatory writing using Reading Street 2011?

12 Role of Informative/Explanatory Writing Informative/Explanatory writing conveys information accurately. This kind of writing serves one or more closely related purposes: to increase readers’ knowledge of a subject to help readers better understand a procedure or process to provide readers with an enhanced comprehension of a concept (Common Core State Standards Initiate 2010b, 23)

13 13 Informative Text - To Explain or Inform Definition –Text –That conveys information accurately Purpose –To increase reader’s knowledge of subject –To help reader understand a procedure or process –To provide reader with enhanced understanding of concept Genre –literary analyses, reports, summaries, comparisons, instructions, manuals, memos, resumes

14 Range of Informative/Explanatory Writing What kinds of informative/explanatory writing do students do in your classroom?

15 Informative/Explanatory vs. Opinion and Argument Writing Review the explanation of the distinction between informative/explanatory and opinion/argument writing on page 23 of Appendix A. Use the chart to summarize differences between these genres.

16 Informative/Explanatory Writing in Reading Street 2011

17 Integrating Research and Writing Under which genre(s) does research fall?

18 Narrative Writing 3 Section 3 Big Questions What does effective narrative writing look like? How can you support narrative writing using Reading Street 2011?

19 Role of Narrative Writing What distinguishes narrative writing from the other genres that we’ve talked about today? The critical element of narrative is progression through time.

20 20 Narratives - To Convey an Experience Definition –A written product –That conveys real or imagined experiences –Using time as the structure Purpose –To entertain –To inform –To instruct –To persuade Genre –fictional stories, memoirs, anecdotes, autobiographies

21 Progression of Narrative Writing Standards Grade Levels Compared What new skills are developed as students move from one grade to the next? Kindergarten and Grade 1 Grade 1 and Grade 2 Grade 2 and Grade 3 Grade 3 and Grade 4 Grade 4 and Grade 5 Grade 5 and Grade 6

22 Narrative Writing in Reading Street 2011

23 Integrating Grammar and Writing Instruction 4 Section Big Q4uestion How are the Grammar and Writing Standards related?

24 Integration of Language and Writing Standards Language skills are designed to be implemented with other ELA strands. Many skills are repeated. Skills are progressive in nature. Groundwork must be established in the elementary years. “The inclusion of Language standards in their own strand should not be taken as an indication that skills related to conventions, effective language use, and vocabulary are unimportant to reading, writing, speaking, and listening; indeed, they are inseparable from such contexts.” (Common Core State Standards Initiative. 2010a, 51)

25 Explore Grammar Instruction within Reading Street 2011 Activity Sequentially developed scope and sequence Skills developed throughout lesson activities Skills applied in the Reader’s and Writer’s Notebook and Let’s Practice It! activities In-context instruction Reading Street provides

26 Review and Closing 6 Section 6 Big Question What have you learned during today’s session?

27 Reflection What is one goal you have for your students in regards to developing as writers? What are you going to do to help your students meet that goal? What strategies will you begin to use with English language learners to support their growth as writers? How will Reading Street support you in helping students meet the Writing Standards?

28 Outcomes Review Plan appropriate writing prompts and assignments to scaffold students to higher standards. Apply grade-appropriate instructional strategies that support students in writing opinion/argument and informative/explanatory pieces.

29 Pearson Professional Development pearsonpd.com

30 Closing Digging into the Writing Standards with Reading Street 2011 Heather Walker April 25, 2013

31 31 Critical CCSS vocabulary Editing – A part of writing and preparing presentations concerned chiefly with improving the clarity, organization, concision, and correctness of expression relative to task, purpose, and audience; compared to revising, a smaller-scale activity often associated with surface aspects of a text Revising – A part of writing and preparing presentations concerned chiefly with a reconsideration and reworking of the content of a text relative to task, purpose, and audience; compared to editing, a larger-scale activity often associated with the overall content and structure of a text

32 32 Critical CCSS vocabulary Evidence – Facts, figures, details, quotations, or other sources of data and information that provide support for claims or an analysis and that can be evaluated by others; should appear in a form and be derived from a source widely accepted as appropriate to a particular discipline, as in details or quotations from a text in the study of literature and experimental results in the study of science

33 33 Critical CCSS vocabulary Evidence – Facts, figures, details, quotations, or other sources of data and information that provide support for claims or an analysis and that can be evaluated by others; should appear in a form and be derived from a source widely accepted as appropriate to a particular discipline, as in details or quotations from a text in the study of literature and experimental results in the study of science

34 34 BIG IDEAS - Teach the “What” and “How” WHAT –Critical attributes –Rubric –Example HOW –Writing Process

35 35 WHAT Ask yourself, what are the CRITICAL ATTRIBUTES of a well- written product. Consider the Six Traits –Ideas –Organization –Word Choice –Voice –Sentence Fluency –Conventions Consider the Descriptions in the Standards

36 36 What Design a simple, easy to understand RUBRIC. Carefully examine the genre descriptions in the Common Core State Standards. Consider introducing only a portion of the rubric initially. Focus on ideas, organization, and conventions. Provide an EXAMPLE to illustrate the critical attributes. (Optional) Guide students in analyzing a non-example to determine missing attributes.

37 37 HOW - Plan PlanT = Task/Topic A = Audience P = Purpose PlanThink or Research and gather evidence

38 38 Big Idea - Provide judicious practice. Have students write many products of focus genre to promote mastery. After initial instruction, products can be composed in a variety of classes.

39 39 Big Idea - Provide Feedback Provide feedback in real time as you circulate and monitor. Correct, Encourage, Correct Have students carefully check their products against the rubric. Have students give focused feedback to their partners. Provide feedback to students on a portion of the rubric. Provide feedback on final drafts using the rubric.

40 References


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