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Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Organizing Your Team for the Day Select a:  Facilitator  Recorder/reporter  Timekeeper Turn off cell phones. Check homework:

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Presentation on theme: "Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Organizing Your Team for the Day Select a:  Facilitator  Recorder/reporter  Timekeeper Turn off cell phones. Check homework:"— Presentation transcript:

1 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Organizing Your Team for the Day Select a:  Facilitator  Recorder/reporter  Timekeeper Turn off cell phones. Check homework: Masters of Motivation Article Assessment Through the Students’ Eyes 10 copies of re-do or Power of I policy

2 Southern Regional Education Board Raising Expectations Part 3: Implementing Re-Do Policies Heather Boggs Sass High Schools That Work

3 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Our Agenda  Reflection on Actions Taken and Review from October and March  Effort-Based Culture  Re-Do Policies  Tuning Protocol  Team Planning Time

4 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Carousel Sharing  Actions Taken  Lessons Learned  Questions  Implications Handouts, page 3

5 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Common Understandings About Culture  Culture is intangible  Culture is complex  Culture evolves over time  Culture is powerful

6 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Building a Culture That Motivates All Students Begins with Examining Beliefs A Belief is... A consciously held, cognitive view about truth and reality

7 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Link Between Beliefs & Behaviors  Beliefs are literally how we comprehend and deal with the world around us.

8 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 8 Problems Inherent in Beliefs  Our beliefs are the truth (for us).  The truth is obvious (to us, so it should be to others!).  Our beliefs are based on real, but we select the real data. --Senge, Schools That Learn, p. 68

9 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Messages Reflected in Effort- Based Cultures “I will not give up on you!” “I believe you can do it.” “This is important.” Handouts, page 4

10 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Building a Culture That Motivates All Students Effort-based Ability-based

11 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 All students can learn. All students can learn. How do beliefs about ability and achievement affect the behaviors of teachers and other school staff? Handouts, page 5

12 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Effort makes a difference in achievement. How do beliefs about efficacy and effort affect the behaviors of teachers and other school staff ? Handouts, page 6

13 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Core Beliefs of Effort- Based Cultures  All children can learn, and it’s my job to see that they do.  We have the skills and the will to make a difference in the learning of each child. Failure is not an option.  Each faculty/staff member is responsible for the learning of each child in our school. We share collective responsibility for their learning.

14 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Assessing What I Believe  Do I believe this is essential?  Do I believe this is practiced at our school?  Where are the gaps between belief and practice? Handouts, page 7

15 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Reflection on Beliefs  All students can learn?  Effort makes a difference?  Strengths and areas for improvement? Handouts, page 8

16 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Masters of Motivation  Find your section of the article.  List the examples from the article.  List “observable behaviors.” What would you see if this were in place?  List “what’s working” at your school in this area of practice.

17 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Interactive Teaching Behaviors  Patterns of Calling on Students  Responses to Student Answers  Giving Help  Dealing with Errors  Offering Feedback on Student Performance  Displaying Tenacity Handouts, page 9

18 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 18 Classroom Structures and Procedures  Grading  Re-Teaching Loops  Re-dos and Re- Takes  Grouping  Rewards

19 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Classroom Climate and Personal Relationship Building  Community  Ownership  Risk-Taking

20 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Explicit Teaching of Effective Effort  Time  Focus  Resourcefulness  Strategies  Use of Feedback  Commitment  Self Assessment, page 11

21 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 School-Wide Structures  Assignment of Teachers  Course Schedules  Grouping  Identification of At-Risk Students and the Provision of Extra Help

22 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Change in Beliefs: Effort Based Beliefs are Needed to Implement Re-Do A focus on:  learning rather than teaching.  collaborative teams working together.  assessments to identify students who need more time and support NOT to identify who failed to learn.  systemic responses and intervention when students don’t learn.  results.

23 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Factors to Bring About Change in People’s Thinking  Reason  Research  Resonance  Representational Re-descriptions  Resources and Reward  Real-World Events  Confrontation Howard Gardner, Changing Minds: The Art and Science of Changing Our Own and Other People’s Minds, 2004.

24 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Collaborative Study  Promotes clarity  Promotes consistent priorities  Is essential to the common pacing required for formative assessments  Helps establish a viable curriculum  Creates ownership of the curriculum

25 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 How Will You Organize Into Implementation Teams? Who will work together?  Course Teams  Content Area Teams  Grade Level Teams  Electronic Teams Who will facilitate that work?  Summer Training Representatives  Team Facilitation Training  Regular Meetings with Team Facilitators

26 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Finding Time for Teams Regular Meeting Times  Planning Periods  Staff Meetings  Early Release/Late Arrival  After- or Before-School Intensive Work Times  Day with Substitutes  Subsidized Time After School  Subsidized Time During the Summer

27 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Process of Pilot, Reflect, Review, and Refine  Process of piloting units of study  Reflection questions  Review of assessment data and evidence of students progress toward the standards  Refinement of units

28 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 When people see tangible results, however incremental at first, and see how the results flow from the overall concept, they will line up with enthusiasm. People want to be part of a winning team. When they feel the magic of momentum, when they begin to see tangible results—that’s when they get on board. Jim Collins, Good to Great. (2001).

29 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Specific goals should be designed to allow teams to achieve small wins as they pursue their common purpose. Small wins are invaluable to building members’ commitment and overcoming the obstacles that get in the way of achieving a meaningful, long-term purpose. J. Katzenback & D. Smith. The Wisdom of Teams: Creating the High-Performance Organization. (1993).

30 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Set Team Goals and Complete Action Plans  Establish annual SMART goals  Strategic  Specific  Measurable  Attainable  Result-Oriented  Timebound  Establish a series of short-term goals  Create specific action plans

31 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Examples School Goals:  Reduce failure rate.  Increase percentage of students scoring at or above the established proficiency standard.  Reality: Last year 20% of our students failed math. 31% scored below the proficiency level on the state exam. Math Team SMART Goal:  We will reduce the percentage of failing students to 10% or less and the percentage of students unable to meet state standards to no more than 15%. Adapted from: Learning by Doing: Professional Learning Communities at Work. DuFour, DuFour, Eaker, & Many.

32 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Action Plans  Written so that each teacher knows his/her role in meeting the goals  Action Steps, Person(s) Responsible, Timeline and Evidence of Effectiveness  Submitted to leadership team for approval  Monitoring conferences  Celebrations Handouts, page 35

33 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Strategies to Measure Implementation and Provide Feedback  District-Level Sharing  Grade Distribution Data  Classroom Walk-Throughs  Tuning Protocols  Implementation Rubrics—Rigor Rubric  Annual Progress Checks  Revisions of Action Plans

34 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Actions for Creating an Effort-Based Culture That Motivates All Students

35 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Policies and Conditions for Effectively Re-Doing Work

36 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 “ Good teaching is going on whenever students are involved in redoing, polishing, and perfecting their work.” The Pedagogy of Poverty Vs. Good Teaching Martin Haberman What is the research base for asking students to revise work?

37 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Re-Doing Work—The Research  High Schools That Work Assessment Findings: Students who are given opportunities to re-do work to a level of quality have better student achievement.  The National Writing Project: Students learn more from re-writing a few essays that from writing a number of essays once.

38 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 The Power of Feedback  “Providing students with specific information about their standing in terms of particular objectives increased their achievement by 37 percent.”  John Hattie’s review of 7,827 classroom studies.  “The most powerful single innovation that enhances achievement is feedback.”  Robert Marzano, 2001.

39 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 “In standards-based classrooms, students have the opportunity to continuously revise and improve their work over the course of several days.” Doug Reeves, Center for Performance Assessment

40 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 “One of the easiest ways for human beings to avoid the responsibility of failure is to quit trying.” Lynn Canady

41 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 “By the time many struggling students reach adolescence, they have learned to protect their self-esteem by saying they “don't care about the (stupid) work” rather than risk proving themselves incompetent by trying and failing.” If They Only Did Their Work, Linda Darling- Hammond and Olivia Ifill-Lynch, Educational Leadership, February 2006.

42 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Assessment—Winning and Losing Streaks Through the Student’s Eyes Continual Evidence of SuccessContinual Evidence of Failure Students feel hopeful and optimistic. Students feel hopeless. “Feedback helps me.”“Feedback is criticism. It hurts.” “See the trend? I can succeed.”“I just can’t do this... again.” The student persists in the face of setbacks. The student gives up when things become challenging. Students accept responsibility.Students deny responsibility. Self-enhancement and motivation.Self-defeat. No feelings of success. Assessment Through the Student’s Eyes, Rick Stiggins, Educational Leadership, May 2007.

43 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Why Redoing Work is Essential  Important to success of struggling students  Promotes more efficient learning  Provides feedback essential to learning  Instills a sense of persistence and motivation Handouts, page 12

44 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Have you heard...?  “Students have to be held accountable.”  “We have to prepare students for the real world.”  “It isn’t fair to give some students more time.”  “Students should work harder to get it right the first time.”  “If I let students redo work I’ll be overwhelmed with the grading.” Handouts, page 12

45 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Approaches to Re-Doing Work  Re-Take Tests and Quizzes  Finite Period for Re- Doing Work  Drafts for Revisions  Formative, Not Summative  Scaffolding Opportunities Handouts, page 13

46 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Compare Two Policies  Read the sample policies for Algebra I and the English department  Consider:  What are the similarities? The differences?  Which policy will best support more students in reaching standards? Why? Handouts, page 16

47 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Examples of Re-Doing Work Policies from Course Syllabi  “Opportunity” vs. “Expectation  “Some” vs. “Any” Work  Grade Penalty vs. Quality of Work Grade Handouts, page 17

48 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 The Power of “I” Current Practice:  Zeros for missing work  Creates a culture that not doing the work is an option  Ineffective practice that is not changing behavior of low- performing students To Fix the Problem  High expectations mean students meeting standards  All work must be completed  Extra help opportunities to complete work  Consequences for “I”  Asterisk failing grades due to incomplete work Handouts, page 18

49 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 A Checklist of Actions for Setting Up Redoing Work

50 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Develop Your Rationale  Provide feedback and re-teaching to help ALL students meet standards  Set high expectations  Not giving up on students  Develop internal motivation and persistence Handouts, page 14

51 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Develop Expectations  What will be redone  Consider redo format  Determine how redo will effect grading  Set up re-teaching loops  Develop redoing work forms (page 24)  Place constraints Handouts, page 14

52 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Inform Students and Parents  Course syllabi  Special communication  Presentations at orientation, open house, and conferences  Sample letters pages 31- 32 Handouts, page 15

53 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Set Up Extra Help  “Required” help sessions  Inform parents  Limit participation in extra curricular  Incomplete work—no term grade  Asterisk term grades to indicate due to missing work Handouts, page 15

54 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Collect and Analyze Data  Number of students completing re-dos  Number of students who improve grades as a result of re-do Handouts, page 15

55 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Principles for Building a System of Intervention  Comprehensive  Well-Organized  Clearly Communicated  Data Driven  Mandatory  Well-Balanced  Tiers of Intervention Handouts, page 19

56 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Supporting Students in Reaching Proficiency  Process that is followed when students fall below a C  Re-taking assignments and assessments to reach proficiency  Requiring all students to complete work  Comprehensive system of extra help  Rewards, recognition, and motivation Handouts, page 20

57 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Keeping Track of and Communicating Student Progress  Weekly grade updates  Three-week progress reports  Student alert forms, Page 21  Success contracts, Page 22  Conference records  Report cards  Daily attendance records  Discipline records  Other

58 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Sample Policies  Anacortes  Oak Harbor  Success Center  Indianola Middle School  Hoover  Fairfield  Rocky Mountain

59 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Tuning Protocol  How effective is our policy?

60 Reflections of a High School Senior

61 Company LOGO April 28, 2009 Reflection: What Will You “Take Away?”  Strengths We Can Build On  Actions We Can Take  What should we implement?  What should we share with others?


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