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Doing It Better Than We’ve Ever Done It Before! S E C O N D A R Y E D U C A T I O N August 25, 2012 8:30-12:30.

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Presentation on theme: "Doing It Better Than We’ve Ever Done It Before! S E C O N D A R Y E D U C A T I O N August 25, 2012 8:30-12:30."— Presentation transcript:

1 Doing It Better Than We’ve Ever Done It Before! S E C O N D A R Y E D U C A T I O N August 25, :30-12:30

2 I.8:30 – 9:00 a.m. Awareness Through Data II.9:00 – 9:30 a.m. Performance Level Descriptors III.9:30 – 10:30 a.m. Literary Composition I.SE’s Tested on Composition—connect SE’s to rubric and think about what skills students need to accomplish the SE II.Rubric Analysis III.Analyze Released Literary Compositions IV.10:30 – 11:30 p.m. Expository Composition I.SE’s Tested on Composition II.Rubric Analysis III.Analyze Released Expository Compositions V.11:30-11:45 a.m.Reflect and Discuss Writing Selections VI.11:45 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Taking Action

3 Story Starters Scholastic Story Starters ers/storystarter1.htm ers/storystarter1.htm

4 Write around Work in pairs Each pair will have only 1 sheet of paper and 1 pen or pencil Partner A will start the story and only has 30 seconds to write something and then gives the paper and pen/pencil to Partner B Partner B reads the sentence and also has 30 seconds to add to the story The writing of the story continues until time is called (you will only have 5 minutes as a team)

5 Calibrate To plan or devise (something) carefully so as to have a precise use, application, or appeal

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7 Possible Points: 32 (16 per composition) Possible Points: 15 Possible Total Points: 62

8 Source: TCTELA2012 Presentation, V. Young, TEA Director, ELAR 2 Scorers A rating is different from number of points possible (maximum possible points: 4)

9 Source: TCTELA2012 Presentation, V. Young, TEA Director, ELAR The summed score is then multiplied by 2. 8 x8 = 16 The summed score is then multiplied by 2. 8 x8 = 16

10 On average, then, our students are scoring a 2.4 on literary On average, then, our students are scoring a 2.4 on literary And… 2.25 on expository And… 2.25 on expository What about Revising? Editing? How do these scores impact or relate back to the composition scores? What about Revising? Editing? How do these scores impact or relate back to the composition scores?

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18 Literary Composition

19 1.Unpack the SE—highlight the verbs, underline the academic vocabulary. 2.For each SE, determine what skills students need to have prior to the EOC. What should they be able to do? 1.Unpack the SE—highlight the verbs, underline the academic vocabulary. 2.For each SE, determine what skills students need to have prior to the EOC. What should they be able to do?

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21 Eng I Literary 4 Accomplished 3 Satisfactory 2 Basic 1 Limited I. ESSAY STRUCTURE  The form or structure of the story is appropriate to the purpose and responsive to the specific demands of the prompt. The writer uses narrative strategies or literary devices that are particularly well suited to the literary task. The writer is able to skillfully convey the story. II. DETAILS  All details contribute to the effectiveness of the story. The writer focuses on a specific character, event, or idea and sustains that focus, strengthening the unity and coherence of the story. III. PRESENTATION OF STORY  The writer’s presentation of the story is well controlled. Meaningful transitions and strong sentence-to-sentence connections enhance the logical movement of the story. I. ESSAY STRUCTURE  The form or structure of the story is, for the most part, appropriate to the purpose and responsive to the specific demands of the prompt. The writer uses narrative strategies or literary devices that are adequately suited to the literary task. The writer is able to clearly convey the story. II. DETAILS  Most details contribute to the effectiveness of the story. The writer focuses on a specific character, event, or idea and generally sustains that focus. The story is coherent, though it may not always be unified due to minor lapses in focus. III. PRESENTATION OF STORY  The writer’s presentation of the story is adequately controlled. For the most part, transitions are meaningful, and sentence- to-sentence connections are sufficient to support the logical movement of the story. I. ESSAY STRUCTURE  The form or structure of the story is evident but may not always be appropriate to the purpose or responsive to the specific demands of the prompt. The writer uses narrative strategies or literary devices that are only somewhat suited to the literary task. The writer is able to convey some sense of the story. II. DETAILS  Some of the details do not contribute to the story. The writer may focus on a specific character, event, or idea but may not sustain that focus, limiting the unity and coherence of the story. III. PRESENTATION OF STORY  The writer’s presentation of the story is inconsistent. Sometimes repetition or wordiness causes minor disruptions in the story line. At other times transitions and sentence-to-sentence connections are too perfunctory or weak to support the logical movement of the story. I. ESSAY STRUCTURE  The form or structure of the story is inappropriate to the purpose or the specific demands of the prompt. The writer uses narrative strategies or literary devices that are only marginally suited to the literary task, or they are inappropriate or not evident at all. The writer presents the story in a random or illogical way, causing it to lack clarity and direction. II. DETAILS  Many of the details do not contribute to the story. The writer’s lack of focus on a specific character, event, or idea weakens the unity and coherence of the story. III. PRESENTATION OF STORY  The writer’s presentation of the story is weak. Repetition or wordiness sometimes causes serious disruptions in the story line. At other times the lack of meaningful transitions and sentence-to- sentence connections makes one or more parts of the story unclear or difficult to follow. I. DETAILS  Specific, well-chosen details add substance to the story. These details contribute significantly to key literary elements such as character development, conflict, and point of view. II. THOUGHTFUL & ENGAGING  The story is thoughtful and engaging. The writer may respond to the prompt from an unusual perspective, may use his/her unique experiences or view of the world as a basis for writing, or may connect ideas in interesting ways. The writer develops the story in a manner that demonstrates a thorough understanding of the literary writing task. I. DETAILS  Specific details add some substance to the story. For the most part, these details contribute to key literary elements such as character development, conflict, and point of view. II. THOUGHFUL & ENGAGING  The story reflects some thoughtfulness. The writer's response to the prompt is original rather than formulaic. The writer develops the story in a manner that demonstrates a good understanding of the literary writing task. I. DETAILS  The development of the story is minimal and remains at a surface level because there are few details, they are not always appropriate, or they are too general. For the most part, the details contribute only marginally to key literary elements such as character development, conflict, and point of view. II. THOUGHTFUL & ENGAGING  The story reflects little or no thoughtfulness. The writer’s response to the prompt is sometimes formulaic. The writer develops the story in a manner that demonstrates only a limited understanding of the literary writing task. I. DETAILS  The development of the story is weak because the details are inappropriate, vague, or insufficient. They do not contribute to key literary elements such as character development, conflict, and point of view. II. THOUGHTFUL & ENGAGING  The story is insubstantial because the writer’s response to the prompt may be vague or confused. In some cases, the story as a whole is only weakly linked to the prompt. In other cases, the writer develops the story in a manner that demonstrates a lack of understanding of the literary writing task. I. WORD CHOICE  The writer’s word choice is vivid and expressive. It reflects a keen awareness of the literary purpose. The word choice strongly contributes to the quality and clarity of the story. II. SENTENCE STRUCTURE  Sentences are purposeful, varied, and well controlled, enhancing the effectiveness of the story. III. GRAMMAR & MECHANCS  The writer demonstrates a consistent command of sentence boundaries and spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar, and usage conventions. Although minor errors may be evident, they do not detract from the fluency of the writing or the clarity of the story. The overall strength of the conventions contributes to the effectiveness of the story. I. WORD CHOICE  The writer’s word choice is, for the most part, specific and concrete. It reflects an awareness of the literary purpose. The word choice usually contributes to the quality and clarity of the story. II. SENTENCE STRUCTURE  Sentences are varied and adequately controlled, for the most part contributing to the effectiveness of the story. III. GRAMMAR & MECHANICS  The writer demonstrates an adequate command of sentence boundaries and spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar and usage conventions. Although some errors may be evident, they create few (if any) disruptions in the fluency of the writing, and they do not affect the clarity of the story. I. WORD CHOICE  The writer’s word choice may be general or imprecise. It reflects a basic awareness of the literary purpose. The word choice may limit the quality and clarity of the story. II. SENTENCE STRUCTURE  Sentences may be awkward or only somewhat controlled, limiting the effectiveness of the story. III. GRAMMAR & MECHANICS  The writer demonstrates a partial command of sentence boundaries and spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar, and usage conventions. Some distracting errors may be evident, at times creating minor disruptions in the fluency or meaning of the writing. I. WORD CHOICE  The writer’s word choice may be vague or limited. It reflects little or no awareness of the literary purpose. The word choice may impede the quality and clarity of the story. II. SENTENCE STRUCTURE  Sentences may be simplistic, awkward, or uncontrolled, weakening the effectiveness of the story. III. GRAMMAR & MECHANICS  The writer has little or no command of sentence boundaries and spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar, and usage conventions. Serious and persistent errors create disruptions in the fluency of the writing and sometimes interfere with meaning. ORGANIZATIONORGANIZATION PROGRESSIONPROGRESSION & DEVELOPMENTDEVELOPMENT IDEASIDEAS OFOF USE OF LANGUAGELANGUAGE & CONVENTIONSCONVENTIONS

22 Make the Connection Look at your rubric and SE’s side-by-side On your rubric, make notes on which SE matches the criteria (do it under the first column—under 4) For example…

23 Eng I Literary 4 Accomplished 3 Satisfactory 2 Basic 1 Limited I. ESSAY STRUCTURE  The form or structure of the story is appropriate to the purpose and responsive to the specific demands of the prompt. The writer uses narrative strategies or literary devices that are particularly well suited to the literary task. The writer is able to skillfully convey the story. II. DETAILS  All details contribute to the effectiveness of the story. The writer focuses on a specific character, event, or idea and sustains that focus, strengthening the unity and coherence of the story. III. PRESENTATION OF STORY  The writer’s presentation of the story is well controlled. Meaningful transitions and strong sentence-to-sentence connections enhance the logical movement of the story. I. ESSAY STRUCTURE  The form or structure of the story is, for the most part, appropriate to the purpose and responsive to the specific demands of the prompt. The writer uses narrative strategies or literary devices that are adequately suited to the literary task. The writer is able to clearly convey the story. II. DETAILS  Most details contribute to the effectiveness of the story. The writer focuses on a specific character, event, or idea and generally sustains that focus. The story is coherent, though it may not always be unified due to minor lapses in focus. III. PRESENTATION OF STORY  The writer’s presentation of the story is adequately controlled. For the most part, transitions are meaningful, and sentence- to-sentence connections are sufficient to support the logical movement of the story. I. ESSAY STRUCTURE  The form or structure of the story is evident but may not always be appropriate to the purpose or responsive to the specific demands of the prompt. The writer uses narrative strategies or literary devices that are only somewhat suited to the literary task. The writer is able to convey some sense of the story. II. DETAILS  Some of the details do not contribute to the story. The writer may focus on a specific character, event, or idea but may not sustain that focus, limiting the unity and coherence of the story. III. PRESENTATION OF STORY  The writer’s presentation of the story is inconsistent. Sometimes repetition or wordiness causes minor disruptions in the story line. At other times transitions and sentence-to-sentence connections are too perfunctory or weak to support the logical movement of the story. I. ESSAY STRUCTURE  The form or structure of the story is inappropriate to the purpose or the specific demands of the prompt. The writer uses narrative strategies or literary devices that are only marginally suited to the literary task, or they are inappropriate or not evident at all. The writer presents the story in a random or illogical way, causing it to lack clarity and direction. II. DETAILS  Many of the details do not contribute to the story. The writer’s lack of focus on a specific character, event, or idea weakens the unity and coherence of the story. III. PRESENTATION OF STORY  The writer’s presentation of the story is weak. Repetition or wordiness sometimes causes serious disruptions in the story line. At other times the lack of meaningful transitions and sentence-to- sentence connections makes one or more parts of the story unclear or difficult to follow. I. DETAILS  Specific, well-chosen details add substance to the story. These details contribute significantly to key literary elements such as character development, conflict, and point of view. II. THOUGHTFUL & ENGAGING  The story is thoughtful and engaging. The writer may respond to the prompt from an unusual perspective, may use his/her unique experiences or view of the world as a basis for writing, or may connect ideas in interesting ways. The writer develops the story in a manner that demonstrates a thorough understanding of the literary writing task. I. DETAILS  Specific details add some substance to the story. For the most part, these details contribute to key literary elements such as character development, conflict, and point of view. II. THOUGHFUL & ENGAGING  The story reflects some thoughtfulness. The writer's response to the prompt is original rather than formulaic. The writer develops the story in a manner that demonstrates a good understanding of the literary writing task. I. DETAILS  The development of the story is minimal and remains at a surface level because there are few details, they are not always appropriate, or they are too general. For the most part, the details contribute only marginally to key literary elements such as character development, conflict, and point of view. II. THOUGHTFUL & ENGAGING  The story reflects little or no thoughtfulness. The writer’s response to the prompt is sometimes formulaic. The writer develops the story in a manner that demonstrates only a limited understanding of the literary writing task. I. DETAILS  The development of the story is weak because the details are inappropriate, vague, or insufficient. They do not contribute to key literary elements such as character development, conflict, and point of view. II. THOUGHTFUL & ENGAGING  The story is insubstantial because the writer’s response to the prompt may be vague or confused. In some cases, the story as a whole is only weakly linked to the prompt. In other cases, the writer develops the story in a manner that demonstrates a lack of understanding of the literary writing task. I. WORD CHOICE  The writer’s word choice is vivid and expressive. It reflects a keen awareness of the literary purpose. The word choice strongly contributes to the quality and clarity of the story. II. SENTENCE STRUCTURE  Sentences are purposeful, varied, and well controlled, enhancing the effectiveness of the story. III. GRAMMAR & MECHANCS  The writer demonstrates a consistent command of sentence boundaries and spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar, and usage conventions. Although minor errors may be evident, they do not detract from the fluency of the writing or the clarity of the story. The overall strength of the conventions contributes to the effectiveness of the story. I. WORD CHOICE  The writer’s word choice is, for the most part, specific and concrete. It reflects an awareness of the literary purpose. The word choice usually contributes to the quality and clarity of the story. II. SENTENCE STRUCTURE  Sentences are varied and adequately controlled, for the most part contributing to the effectiveness of the story. III. GRAMMAR & MECHANICS  The writer demonstrates an adequate command of sentence boundaries and spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar and usage conventions. Although some errors may be evident, they create few (if any) disruptions in the fluency of the writing, and they do not affect the clarity of the story. I. WORD CHOICE  The writer’s word choice may be general or imprecise. It reflects a basic awareness of the literary purpose. The word choice may limit the quality and clarity of the story. II. SENTENCE STRUCTURE  Sentences may be awkward or only somewhat controlled, limiting the effectiveness of the story. III. GRAMMAR & MECHANICS  The writer demonstrates a partial command of sentence boundaries and spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar, and usage conventions. Some distracting errors may be evident, at times creating minor disruptions in the fluency or meaning of the writing. I. WORD CHOICE  The writer’s word choice may be vague or limited. It reflects little or no awareness of the literary purpose. The word choice may impede the quality and clarity of the story. II. SENTENCE STRUCTURE  Sentences may be simplistic, awkward, or uncontrolled, weakening the effectiveness of the story. III. GRAMMAR & MECHANICS  The writer has little or no command of sentence boundaries and spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar, and usage conventions. Serious and persistent errors create disruptions in the fluency of the writing and sometimes interfere with meaning. ORGANIZATIONORGANIZATION PROGRESSIONPROGRESSION & DEVELOPMENTDEVELOPMENT IDEASIDEAS OFOF USE OF LANGUAGELANGUAGE & CONVENTIONSCONVENTIONS 13B

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25 Let’s Dissect the Prompt 1.What are students expected to do? 2.How will they do it? 3.What prior knowledge do they need to have to be successful with plot and characterization? Let’s Dissect the Prompt 1.What are students expected to do? 2.How will they do it? 3.What prior knowledge do they need to have to be successful with plot and characterization?

26 SE’s: 14A Literary #10#6 Is the story engaging? Why or why not? What is the conflict? What is the resolution? Who are the characters? Are they interesting and believable? Why or why not? What literary strategies (such as dialogue & suspense) did the writer use? Cite some examples. What devices did the writer use to enhance the plot? Cite some examples. What recommendations would you make to this writer? How could his/her composition be improved? Think about parts that you wish you had more details or maybe you got details you really didn’t think were needed. Give the writer some ideas.

27 SE: 13 B, C,D Writing Process #10#6 How did the writer structure his/her composition? What transitions and rhetorical devices did the writer use? Name the device and cite an example. What about the writer’s word choice and use of figurative language? Give examples. What kinds of sentences did the writer have? How did the writer address the purpose, audience, and genre? What about mistakes in grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling? A few? Some? Too many? What recommendations would you make to this writer? Where there some parts where you got lost? What about sentences—too short? Too long? Maybe some sentences can be combined? Where can the writer include some figurative language? Give the writer some ideas.

28 What score would you give this composition? Defend your score based on SE’s and rubric. What score would you give this composition? Defend your score based on SE’s and rubric.

29 What score would you give this composition?

30 Literary Composition #10

31 Literary Composition #6

32 SISD Fall 2013 Student Literary Samples Good-Bye and How Could You… Read each of the copies and give each piece a score. Remember to defend your score in reference to literary rubric and SE’s

33 In Summary… What do students need to do to write a 3 or a 4?

34 Expository Composition

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36 4 ADVANCED 3 SATISFACTORY 2 BASIC 1 VERY LIMITED Organization and Progression I. ESSAY STRUCTURE  The organizing structure of the essay is clearly appropriate to the purpose and responsive to the specific demands of the prompt. The essay is skillfully crafted because the writer uses organizational strategies that are particularly well suited to the expository task. II. THESIS STATEMENT  The writer establishes a clear thesis statement. All ideas are strongly related to the thesis statement and are focused on the topic specified in the prompt. By sustaining this focus, the writer is able to create an essay that is unified and coherent. III. PROGRESSION OF IDEAS  The writer’s progression of ideas is logical and well controlled. Meaningful transitions and strong sentence-to-sentence connections enhance the flow of the essay by clearly showing the relationships among ideas, making the writer's train of thought easy to follow. I. ESSAY STRUCTURE  The organizing structure of the essay is, for the most part, appropriate to the purpose and responsive to the specific demands of the prompt. The essay is clear because the writer uses organizational strategies that are adequately suited to the expository task. II. THESIS STATEMENT  The writer establishes a clear thesis statement. Most ideas are related to the thesis and are focused on the topic specified in the prompt. The essay is coherent, though it may not always be unified due to minor lapses in focus. III. PROGRESSION OF IDEAS  The writer’s progression of ideas is generally logical and controlled. For the most part, transitions are meaningful, and sentence-to- sentence connections are sufficient to support the flow of the essay and show the relationships among ideas. I. ESSAY STRUCTURE  The organizing structure of the essay is evident but may not always be appropriate to the purpose or the specific demands of the prompt. The essay is not always clear because the writer uses organizational strategies that are only somewhat suited to the expository task. II. THESIS STATEMENT  Most ideas are generally related to the topic specified in the prompt, but the writer’s thesis statement is weak or somewhat unclear. The lack of an effective thesis statement or the writer’s inclusion of irrelevant information interferes with the focus and coherence of the essay III. PROGRESSION OF IDEAS  The writer’s progression of ideas is not always logical and controlled. Sometimes repetitions or wordiness causes minor disruptions in the flow of the essay. At other times transitions and sentence-to-sentence connections are too perfunctory or weak to support the flow of the essay or show the relationships among ideas. I. ESSAY STRUCTURE  The organizing structure of the essay is inappropriate to the specific demands of the prompt. The writer uses organizational strategies that are only marginally suited to the explanatory task or they are inappropriate or they are not evident at all. II. THESIS STATEMENT  Most ideas are generally related to the topic specified in the prompt, but the writer’s thesis statement is missing, unclear, or illogical. The writer may fail to maintain focus on topic, may include extraneous information, or may shift abruptly from idea to idea weakening the coherence of the essay III. PROGRESSION OF IDEAS  The writer’s progression of ideas is weak. Repetition or wordiness sometimes causes serious disruptions in the flow of the essay. At other times, the lack of transitions and sentence-to-sentence connections causes the writer to present ideas in a random or illogical way, making one or more parts of the essay unclear or too difficult to follow. Development of Ideas I. DEVELOPMENT OF IDEAS  The development of ideas is effective because the writer uses details and examples that are specific and well chosen, adding substance to the essay. II. THOUGHTFUL & ENGAGING  The essay is thoughtful and engaging. The writer may choose to use his/her unique experiences or view of the world as a basis for writing or to connect ideas in interesting ways. The writer develops the essay in a manner that demonstrates a thorough understanding of the expository writing task. I. DEVELOPMENT OF IDEAS  The development of ideas is sufficient because the writer uses details and examples that are specific and appropriate, adding some substance to the essay. II. THOUGHTFUL & ENGAGING  The essay reflects some thoughtfulness. The writer’s response to the prompt is original rather than formulaic. The writer develops the essay in a manner that demonstrates a good understanding of the expository writing task. I. DEVELOPMENT OF IDEAS  The development of ideas is minimal. The essay is superficial because the writer uses details and examples that are not always appropriate or are too briefly or partially presented. II. THOUGHTFUL & ENGAGING  The essay reflects little or no thoughtfulness. The writer’s response to the prompt is sometimes formulaic. The writer develops the essay in a manner that demonstrates only limited understanding of the expository writing task. I. DEVELOPMENT OF IDEAS  The development of ideas is weak. The essay is ineffective because the writer uses details and examples that are inappropriate, vague, or insufficient. II THOUGHTFUL & ENGAGING  The essay is insubstantial because the writer’s response to the essay is vague or confused. In some cases the essay as a whole is only weakly linked to the prompt. In other cases, the writer develops the essay in a manner that demonstrates a lack of understanding of the expository writing task. Use of Language and Conventions I. WORD CHOICE  The writer’s word choice is purposeful and precise. It reflects a keen awareness of the expository purpose and maintains a tone appropriate to the task. The word choice strongly contributes to the quality and clarity of the essay. II. SENTENCE STRUCTURE  Sentences are purposeful, varied, and well controlled, enhancing the effectiveness of the essay. III. GRAMMAR AND MECHANICS  The writer demonstrates a consistent command of sentence boundaries and spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar, and usage conventions. Although minor errors may be evident, they do not detract from the fluency of the writing or the clarity of the essay. The overall strength of the conventions contributes to the effectiveness of the essay. I. WORD CHOICE  The writer’s word choice, for the most part, is clear and specific. It reflects an awareness of the expository purpose and establishes a tone appropriate to the task. The word choice usually contributes to the quality and clarity of the essay. II. SENTENCE STRUCTURE  Sentences are varied and adequately controlled, for the most part contributing to the effectiveness of the essay. III. GRAMMAR AND MECHANICS  The writer demonstrates an adequate command of sentence boundaries and spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar, and usage conventions. Although some errors may be evident, they create few (if any) disruptions in the fluency of the writing and they do not affect the the clarity of the essay. I. WORD CHOICE  The writer’s word choice may be general or imprecise. It reflects a basic awareness of the expository purpose but does little to establish a tone appropriate to the task. The word choice may not contribute to the quality and clarity of the essay. II. SENTENCE STRUCTURE  Sentences are awkward or only somewhat controlled, weakening the effectiveness of the essay. III. GRMMAR AND MECHANICS  The writer demonstrates a partial command of sentence boundaries and spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar, and usage conventions. Some distracting errors may be evident, at times creating minor disruptions in the fluency or meaning of the writing. I. WORD CHOICE  The writer’s word choice may be vague or limited. It reflects little or no awareness of the expository purpose and does not establish a tone appropriate to the task. The word choice may impede the quality and clarity of the essay. II. SENTENCE STRUCTURE  Sentences are simplistic, awkward or uncontrolled, significantly limiting the effectiveness of the essay. III. GRAMMAR AND MECHANICS  The writer has little or no command of sentence boundaries and spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar, and usage conventions. Serious and persistent errors create disruptions in the fluency of the writing and sometimes interfere with meaning. English I & English II Expository Writing Rubric What similarities and differences do you note between the Literary Rubric and Expository Rubric?

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38 Look familiar?

39 1.Unpack the SE—highlight the verbs, underline the academic vocabulary. 2.For each SE, determine what skills students need to have prior to the EOC. What should they be able to do? 1.Unpack the SE—highlight the verbs, underline the academic vocabulary. 2.For each SE, determine what skills students need to have prior to the EOC. What should they be able to do?

40 Let’s Dissect the Prompt 1.How does this prompt differ from the literary prompt? 2.What are students expected to do? 3.Think back to the SE’s and the rubric…what SE’s are addressed here? What about parts of the rubric? Let’s Dissect the Prompt 1.How does this prompt differ from the literary prompt? 2.What are students expected to do? 3.Think back to the SE’s and the rubric…what SE’s are addressed here? What about parts of the rubric?

41 Writing Critically…

42 SE: 15A Expository #6#7 How effective was the introduction? What rhetorical devices did the writer use? How well did the writer transition from one thought to another? How did the writer organize his/her composition? How was the organization appropriate to the purpose, audience, and context? Was the information presented relevant to the topic? Did the writer make valid inferences? Why or why not? Give examples. How effective was the conclusion? What recommendations would you make to this writer? How could his/her composition be improved? Think about parts that you wish you had more details or maybe you got details you really didn’t think were needed. Give the writer some ideas.

43 SE: 15A Expository #10#11 How effective was the introduction? What rhetorical devices did the writer use? How well did the writer transition from one thought to another? How did the writer organize his/her composition? How was the organization appropriate to the purpose, audience, and context? Was the information presented relevant to the topic? Did the writer make valid inferences? Why or why not? Give examples. How effective was the conclusion? What recommendations would you make to this writer? How could his/her composition be improved? Think about parts that you wish you had more details or maybe you got details you really didn’t think were needed. Give the writer some ideas.

44 SE: 13 B, C,D Writing Process #6#7 How did the writer structure his/her composition? What transitions and rhetorical devices did the writer use? Name the device and cite an example. What about the writer’s word choice and use of figurative language? Give examples. What kinds of sentences did the writer have? How did the writer address the purpose, audience, and genre? What about mistakes in grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling? A few? Some? Too many? What recommendations would you make to this writer? Where there some parts where you got lost? What about sentences—too short? Too long? Maybe some sentences can be combined? Where can the writer include some figurative language? Give the writer some ideas.

45 SE: 13 B, C,D Writing Process #10#11 How did the writer structure his/her composition? What transitions and rhetorical devices did the writer use? Name the device and cite an example. What about the writer’s word choice and use of figurative language? Give examples. What kinds of sentences did the writer have? How did the writer address the purpose, audience, and genre? What about mistakes in grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling? A few? Some? Too many? What recommendations would you make to this writer? Where there some parts where you got lost? What about sentences—too short? Too long? Maybe some sentences can be combined? Where can the writer include some figurative language? Give the writer some ideas.

46 What score would you give this composition? Defend your score based on rubric and SE’s. What score would you give this composition? Defend your score based on rubric and SE’s.

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50 Expository #6

51 Expository #7

52 Expository #10

53 Expository #11

54 SISD Fall 2013 Student Expository Samples Run, Never Give Up, and One Good Sport… Read each of the copies and give each piece a score. Remember to defend your score in reference to literary rubric and SE’s

55 In Summary… What do students need to do to write a 3 or a 4 on the expository composition ?

56 Today We Were Here to Calibrate To plan or devise (something) carefully so as to have a precise use, application, or appeal

57 Reflect and Discuss: Team Interview This is how it works… – A team member will stand – A question will be posed – The team member standing will provide an answer to the team – Team members can add to the answer or comment on it – The team member will then call on another team member to stand up and be interviewed

58 Reflect and Discuss: Team Interview Questions What were the main differences between a 2 and a 3? What distinguished a 2 from a 3? What do students know how to do? Where did they go wrong? What can we do to help?

59 Taking Action From our learnings and discoveries today, how can we help students improve their writing? How are we implementing the SE’s in our classrooms? How are we teaching the writing process? How do we connect reading to writing? (Author’s craft) Do we have a scope and sequence for the writing SE’s? When and how will we assess student writing? What next steps will we take if students’ writing is not improving?

60 25 Ways to Use Student Essays Browse through the pamphlet Circle the ideas that you would like to implement

61 Next Steps Compositions released September 17 Sample packet of released will be sent to campuses for scoring and we will then bring group together again for another calibration session Staff Development Sessions targeting writing Preparing our students for the persuasive (English II)

62 Event Description: High School Writing Calibration Workshop Fill in Saturday – In: 8:30 – Out: 12:30


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