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Module 4B for Middle/High School Teachers Florida Standards Assessment and Data Use.

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1 Module 4B for Middle/High School Teachers Florida Standards Assessment and Data Use

2 Transitioning to Florida Standards Project Overview Project is Race to the Top funded until June 2014 All charter schools eligible to participate Develop and deliver targeted training and technical assistance specific to charter schools in two major areas: 1) Implementation of the Florida Standards 2) Access and use of a Local Instructional Improvement System (LIIS) to analyze student achievement data to drive instruction and increase student academic achievement No cost to charter schools 2

3 Project Activities Professional development for teachers, administrators, and governing board members (Delivered regionally) Data Literacy and Use Florida Standards (English Language Arts & Literacy, Math) Value-Added Model (VAM) Training of Trainers Model for Teacher Leaders K-5 (Up to 5 Teachers & 1 Administrator Per School) 6-12 (Up to 5 Teachers & 1 Administrator Per School) Training for charter school teams (Delivered regionally) Self-assessment tool Creating a Florida Standards Implementation Plan Progress monitoring templates 3

4 Professional Development Session Alignment Set 1- (Completed ) Governing Board School Leaders Teachers Math Leadership Teams Session 2 Session 2 Session 1 Session 1 ELA Data Use ELA Math Data Use 4

5 Professional Development Session Alignment Set 2 (will be offered throughout ) Governing Board School Leaders Module 7 ELA & Data Use Teachers Math Leadership Teams Session 4 Session 4 Session 3 Session 3 ELA Data Use Assessment Data Analysis VAM Data Analysis VAM Florida Standards Data & ELA Data & ELA Data & Math Data & Math Session 5 Session 5 Session 6 Session 6 5

6 Module 2 ELA Module 1 Data Use Module 3 Math Module 4 Data Use Module 5 ELA Module 6 Math Module 7 ELA & Data Use Module 8 Math & Data Use You Are Here

7 Travel Notes Mileage to/from the trainings will be reimbursed to the school at $.445/mile (documentation with map and mileage required) Parking and tolls will also be reimbursed with receipt Reimbursement is limited to two cars per school Forms and directions to request reimbursement are available under “Resources” on There are specific instructions included with the form to help fill it out correctly Reimbursements for substitutes are NOT an eligible expense 7

8 Develop a common assessment vocabulary Align school assessment system with the rigorous expectations of new assessments Learn how to assess to inform instruction and to monitor student growth Learn how the VAM fits into Florida’s integrated model of systematic planning and problem solving Dissect a standard and examine assessment alignment Prepare to engage in collaborative analysis of student work Discuss how to strengthen data use and inquiry to improve student performance Module Outcomes 8

9 9 8 Components of Full Florida Standards Implementation

10 Today’s Agenda 10 Welcome and Introductions Pre-Assessment Understanding Florida Standards-Aligned Assessment Monitoring Growth Value-added Model (VAM) Lunch Analyzing Student Work Next Steps Post-Assessment and Wrap Up To Do List

11 Pre-Assessment Introductory Activity 11 Guide Page 4

12 Understanding Florida Standards- Aligned Assessment 12 Section 1

13 13 What Role Does Assessment Play? Florida’s Integrated Approach Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment Teacher & Leader Evaluation Professional Development Examples Include: Danielson Marzano Value Added (VAM) Examples Include: ELA and Math Instructional Shifts FCAT/EOC Classroom Assessments Formative Interim Summative Examples Include: Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) Lesson Study Guide Page 6

14 Curriculum Shifts Instructiona l Shifts Assessmen t Shifts Aligning Assessment to the Florida Standards 14 Systemic Changes

15 Common language can facilitate effective communication and understanding about essential assessment concepts and practices. Consensus on the meaning of terms and expressions is critical to enhance the communication among staff when discussing student achievement. Step 1: Develop a Common Language 15

16 Activity 1a: Develop a Common Language 16 Developing Common Language About Assessment 1.Read the assessment related terms that do not include definitions. Discuss each term and how it relates to other assessment terms. 2.Write each term on a sticky note. Sort words using the commonalities discussed and place into clusters of related terms. 3.Label each cluster to identify how they are related. 4.Review the Common Vocabulary Glossary. Discuss if any changes should be made to each cluster based on the FLDOE assessment term definitions. 5.Partner with another group. Share your thinking on how your group sorted the assessment terms. Guide Pages 7-9

17 Assessments must be aligned to measure what students are expected to know and do in a more rigorous way as stated in the new Florida Standards. Unlike many current classroom assessments, new assessments being developed will test the critical- thinking and problem-solving skills students need to succeed in school and life. What Impact Will the Florida Standards Have On the Charter School’s Assessment System? 17

18 What Are Some of the Math Assessment Changes and Shifts? 18 Mathematical Assessment Shifts Frame and solve a range of complex problems Clearly and precisely construct viable arguments Analyze complex, real world scenarios using mathematical models to interpret and solve problems

19 Math Assessment Example Grade 7 Mathematics 19 Analyze complex, real world scenarios using mathematical models to interpret and solve problems.

20 What Are Some of the ELA/Literacy Assessment Changes and Shifts? 20 English Language Arts and Content Literacy Assessment Shifts Focus on citing evidence and items that may have more than one right answer Inclusion of informational texts across a variety of content areas Simulate research and performance- based components within assessments

21 ELA Assessment Example 21 Grade 6 English Language Arts Focus on citing evidence and items that may have more than one right answer.

22 At your table, look in your Participant Guide on pages Discuss sample Florida Standards-aligned assessment items that are within your grade band and discuss with others at your table the differences in the assessment items compared with your traditional classroom assessments. Brainstorm ideas of changes that would assist in ‘shifting’ your classroom assessments to make them more rigorous. Pause for Reflection on Assessment Shifts 22 Guide Pages 10-15

23 Aligning Your Assessment System What Does It Look Like? 23 Annual Statewide Assessment: FCAT/EOC Periodic Interim Assessments Classroom Summative Assessments Classroom Formative Assessment A Comprehensive Assessment System Includes: Alignment

24 How Do Formative and Summative Assessments Differ? 24 Retrieved from: Florida Department of Education

25 Assessment instruments must directly align with content standards to be learned. All of the assessment’s items or tasks must correspond with what has been or what will be taught. The assessment instrument must provide enough detail to pinpoint specific problems. The results must be available in time to adjust instruction. Teachers must provide specific feedback about what they are doing well and how to improve. Teachers and students must actually use the results to inform teaching and learning. Students must be taught how to self-assess. What is Effective Formative Assessment? 25 Retrieved from: Florida Department of Education

26 Breaking It Down, A School Year Overview 26 Annual Statewide Assessment QuarterlyAssessmentsInterim Ongoing Classroom Summative Assessments Classroom Formative Assessment

27 Reviewing Your Assessment System For Alignment to the Florida Standards 1.Form groups of 3 or 4 people that are in similar grade bands or content areas (e.g. 6-8; 9-10; 11-12; ELA; Math; Technical Subjects) 2.Individually, fill in the activity sheet on pgs with all the assessments given throughout the school year in your grade or subject area. 3.Note the name of the assessment, the type of assessment, how often the assessment is given, and how the results are used. 4.When completed, share your results with members of your group noting which assessments are similar to those given in other charter schools. 5.Discuss what types of shifts the assessments may need to align to the Florida Standards and whether it is essential for all assessments to be more rigorous. Activity 1b: Reviewing Your Assessment System for Alignment to the Florida Standards 27 Guide Pages 16-17

28 Let’s Take a Break… 28 Be back in 15 minutes…

29 Monitoring Growth 29 Section 2

30 Monitoring and documenting student growth and progress is the primary way schools demonstrate effectiveness. Lani Seikaly Do you agree with that statement? Discuss at your table the statement and whether you agree or disagree. Include in the discussion other ways that charter schools can demonstrate effectiveness in addition to student growth and progress. 30

31 Monitoring Growth for All Students Monitoring growth makes it possible to see progress for students at all performance levels (ELL, ESE, and low performing students). Using multiple forms of assessment to monitor growth provides evidence for both teachers and students of progress toward career and college readiness. Examining data over time, rather than one point in time, is beneficial when planning instruction. 31

32 Using Learning Goals with Scales to Monitor Student Progress Learning Goals with Scales is a quality process for “chunking” standards. The teacher develops a set of priority learning goals with scales aligned with the Florida Standards that students may use to monitor their growth and progress in meeting those learning goals. Scales in a learning goal are progression points or levels of growth toward the learning goal. The scales or progress points developed by teachers will show students incremental progress leading to proficiency. 32

33 Using Learning Goals with Scales for Tracking Student Progress Clear Learning Goals Celebratio n of how success occurred Formative Assessments Praise for rigorous effort Scales Goal Setting Processes Tangible Rewards Timely and Actionable Feedback Purposeful Learning Activities Activities aligned with scales and goal result in engagement Learning goals aligned with the Florida Standards help students grow Scales enable student and teacher to track progress Retrieved from: FL Department of Education 33

34 Benefits of Monitoring Student Growth Over Time Using Learning Goals with Scales Clarifies what you want your students to know and be able to do. Provides evidence as to where your students are in the learning progression to meeting their learning goals. Helps to articulate plan to address all students’ learning needs, (struggling students as well as students who have already met the learning goals). Why Monitor Students’ Growth Over Time? 34

35 Creating An Assessment Calendar 1.Place assessments listed in the previous activity in the table on page 19. Be sure to include all types of assessments including assessments that would be part of a student portfolio or monitored by student growth charts. 2.Analyze your assessment calendar for types of assessments, student group (i.e. ELL, ESE) participation rate, number of assessments tracking growth over time (e.g. FAIR) vs. achievement at one point in time (e.g. FCAT). 3.Share your assessment calendar with other members at your table. Compare the frequency of assessments given at the various charter schools. Discuss whether it is important for all assessments to measure growth or are some assessments more valuable for informing instruction and intervention. Does the grade level make a difference? Activity 2: Creating An Assessment Calendar to Monitor Student Growth Over Time 35 Guide Page 19

36 Value-added Model VAM 36 Section 3

37 VAM: Is the model that Florida has adopted to measure the impact of teachers, schools and leaders on student learning Uses student level growth scores to differentiate teacher performance in the area of student learning growth Identifies the “teacher effect”, which is the portion of the student growth attributed to the teacher Will be part of the teacher evaluation system for all charter schools; combines student assessment scores with teacher observation Florida’s Value-added Model (VAM) 37 s/files/VAM_webinar_2.pdf

38 Using VAM As Part of the Data Analysis System Multiple Types of Data VAM Data Teacher Evaluation Data Classroom Walkthrough Data Assessment Data Formative and Summative System Data Attendance, Discipline, Failure Rate Perception Data Student, Parent, and Teacher Surveys 38 VAM is summative data, one part of a comprehensive assessment system.

39 39 What is VAM?

40 Questions to Ask When Analyzing VAM Data What are our strengths as a charter school? In what grade levels and content area(s) did we produce more than expected growth with our students? Is there anything special or different about the instructional strategies when delivering that content? What are the areas of challenge for our charter school? What is different about how this content is delivered? What root cause can we determine that may affect the progress in that content area? 40

41 Activity 3: Comparing Student Growth Models Comparing Student Growth Models 1.Watch the video on Measuring Student Growth 2.Using Activity Sheet 3 on page 21, take notes on the information presented in the video that may be helpful to clarify and develop a clearer understanding of the three different models. Think about how this information may benefit your colleagues at your charter school to develop deeper understanding of growth models. 3.Once the video is complete, discuss the reflection question on the activity sheet with your table. Guide Page 21 Video: Measuring Student Growth 41

42 Bon Appétit 42 Be back in 1 hour…

43 Analyzing Student Work 43 Section 4

44 The Florida Standards increases rigor and requires a greater depth of knowledge from students. Assessments must accurately measure students’ depth of knowledge of the content standards. It is essential that assessments align to the standards being taught and to the level of complexity required for students to successfully demonstrate proficiency. Developing an Understanding of the New Standards’ Impact on Assessment 44

45 Dissecting a Standard 1.Underline important nouns 2.Circle important verbs 3.Make one list of skills and another list of concepts 4.Create a graphic organizer of the standard As the standards change, it is important to revisit dissecting standards to ensure that new classroom assessments align with the new expectations of the standards. Key Steps: 45

46 Dissecting a Standard LACC.W.4.2 Anchor Standard Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. 46

47 Skills Dissecting a Standard Concepts Write Examine Convey Informative text Explanatory text Topic Ideas Information Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. 47

48 Dissecting a Standard text informativeexplanatory writeexamineconvey Topic Ideas Skills Write Examine Convey Concepts Informative text Explanatory text Topic Ideas Information LACC.W.4.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. 48

49 Dissecting A Standard 1.Form groups of 3 or 4 people. Look at the Ninth Grade Writing Standards in your Participant Guide on page Each group will dissect one of the writing standards listed in Activity 4a. 3.Copy one of the standards on the top of a piece of chart paper, leaving room for the development of your graphic organizer. 4.In the standard, underline the important nouns and circle the important verbs. 5.Use the terms you underlined and circled to make two lists with the headings Skills and Concepts for the standard. 6.On the bottom of the chart paper, create a graphic organizer to illustrate how the skills and concepts of the standard are connected. Activity 4a: Dissecting A Standard 49 Guide Page 23

50 Aligning Assessments to Standards Process for developing an assessment that is well-aligned to the Florida Standards that aligns with Florida’s ‘New Way to Work’:  Choose one or more standards to address  Chunk the course content standards and identify the “big ideas” that each standard requires, including what students will know and what students will be able to do  Develop learning goals and describe learning progressions or scales that align to the standard(s) and the big ideas  Design an assessment that will enable students to demonstrate mastery of the learning goals  Check to ensure the assessment aligns to all sections of the standard and learning goals  Plan how to evaluate, provide feedback for growth, and score student work 50

51 Feedback is the process of helping students Assess their performance Identify areas where they are right on target Provide them with information on what they can do in the future to improve weak areas Doug Reeves (2007) states that effective feedback not only tells students how they performed, but how to improve the next time they engage in the task. Providing Effective Feedback 51

52 ClaritySpecificity Tone and Word Choice What Are the Characteristics of Effective Written Feedback? 52 * Based on work from: How to Give Effective Feedback to Your Students. Susan Brookhart. (2008)

53 53 Clarit y Use simple vocabulary Write to the student’s developmental level Check for student understanding of the feedback * Based on work from: How to Give Effective Feedback to Your Students. Susan Brookhart. (2008 ) Effective Feedback Characteristics

54 54 Specificity Give guidance, but do not do the work for the student Give suggestions that are specific enough that students can take concrete next steps for improvement * Based on work from: How to Give Effective Feedback to Your Students. Susan Brookhart. (2008) Effective Feedback Characteristics

55 55 Tone and Word Choice Use words that assume student is an active learner Ask questions Communicate respect for the student as a learner with a positive tone * Based on work from: How to Give Effective Feedback to Your Students. Susan Brookhart. (2008) Effective Feedback Characteristics

56 4b: Putting It All Together - Analyzing Student Work Analyzing Student Work – Part 1 1.Review the activity instructions on page 24 in the Participant Guide. During this activity sample student items will be assessed using the writing standards that were dissected in Activity 4a. 2.As a group, review the rubric that you will be using to assess student’s work. Highlight the key words that will represent the quality of work at each level in the rubric. This will provide a baseline from which you will assess the students’ work and proficiency towards the standards. 3.In your packet there are 2 different student work samples. Individually, read the student work samples and assign a score based upon the rubric and your understanding of the standards that you dissected in the previous activity. Guide Pages

57 Activity 4b: Putting It All Together - Analyzing Student Work Analyzing Student Work- Part 2 4.Share your scores and notes with the other group members. Compare the similarities and differences of the scores and discuss decisions that were made when scoring. 5.In the second part of the activity, as a group provide effective feedback to both of the students to support them in improving their skills. Write the feedback on chart paper. Be sure it meets the 3 criteria of effective written feedback. Guide Pages

58 Next Steps 58 Section 5

59 Activity 5: Next Steps 59 Big IdeasPeople to Share With What are some “big ideas” that you want to make sure to remember from today? With whom in your school do you need to share this with in order to take your next steps toward greater levels of data aligned to the Florida Standards? Guide Page 36

60 Don’t Forget Your Resources flcharterccrstandards.org 60 cpalms.org/project/cpalmscharter.aspx

61 Closing Activities 61

62 Developed a common assessment vocabulary Aligned school assessment system with the rigorous expectations of the Florida Standards Learned to assess to inform instruction and to monitor student growth Learned how the VAM fits into Florida’s integrated model of systematic planning and problem solving Dissected a standard and examined assessment alignment Prepared to engage in collaborative analysis of student work Discussed how to strengthen data use and inquiry to improve student performance Revisiting the Module Outcomes 62

63 Where are you now? Assessing Your Learning Post-Assessment and Session Evaluation 63 Guide Page 38

64


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