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Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient;

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Presentation on theme: "Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient;"— Presentation transcript:

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2 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced.

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5 to portray in words; describe or outline with precision; to specify. the action of thinking about something in a logical, sensible way. closely connected or appropriate to the matter at hand. enough; adequate.

6 state or assert that something is the case, typically without providing evidence or proof. a thing that is indisputably the case. Unrelated to the matter being considered. that which tends to prove or disprove something; ground for belief; proof.

7 Strategy: This strategy will help the students dissect the argument presented in a text and analyze the support presented through a debate. As students listen to or read a debate, they can note the claims, facts, and evidence present. After the notes are taken, students can determine how direct the speaker’s topic was to the piece of evidence. For example, students may recognize that a number of texts cite data without having explained the original study of the speaker may have used irrelevant evidence.

8 I want to show you how to meet this standard without having to spend your life planning away. This is something all of you can do on Monday. With so many different methods, strategies, and skills to keep track of, a few deep understandings come to mind:

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10 CHALLENGING INTERESTING

11 Start class with a question on the board: Are violent video games bad for you? Have the students write down their opinion and why. Thesis statement, reasons, rebuttals of counter-arguments, and personal experiences are encouraged. Observe their writing as it happens. Read them out-loud and have them evaluate each other’s argument.

12 state or assert that something is the case, typically without providing evidence or proof. a thing that is indisputably the case. Unrelated to the matter being considered. that which tends to prove or disprove something; ground for belief; proof.

13 Review the definitions of the following words while conversing with the students: claim, fact, evidence, relevant, irrelevant, opinion, main argument. Have these vocabulary words up on a word-wall or have them define them first. Show or read a debate on the topic. Have the students take notes or highlight the debate. Make sure they are differentiating between fact and opinion. They need to determine each debater’s main argument after doing both.

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18 Watch it again, this time have the students focus on parsing through the arguments. Review the following: claim, fact, evidence, and relevant evidence. Now, have the students review their notes and figure out what is what. Show them a simple model of how it should have been done. Do this for a couple of debates on the topic. Switch the names on the graphic organizer, but have the students continue to immerse themselves in the details. Switch between written and video debates. Be careful not to rush this! This might be a week-long lesson.

19 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced.

20 Assessment: Students author a formal argumentative text to show competency with regards to reading comprehension, proper use of Tier II and III vocabulary, writing, and language use. A CCSS aligned rubric is used to assess writing and language skill, as well as to pinpoint targeted learning opportunities.

21 They need to make something tangible! You should be building up each day to your final project of the week: A published argumentative essay. Initial goal: first draft of introductory paragraph. Slowly build up confidence in their ability to write argumentatively by having them complete a little at a time. Have the students pre-write if there is time. Model what a good introduction is for a piece of argumentative writing. Show them your best example by thinking aloud, then writing it in front of them. Include your revisions and editing.

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24 Do violent video games turn normally passive children into aggressive malcontents? With the popularity of gruesome video games among pre-teens, it is imperative that we find an answer to this question. This debate has been at the forefront of modern psychology for many years and the answer is ambiguous to say the least. With that being said, I feel that the evidence shows there is no clear- cut correlation between belligerent behavior and the playing of brutal video games.

25 Instead of having them write a paper a week and checking it ON YOUR OWN, have them check each other’s. It is called a formative assessment for a reason. Using a CCSS Writing Rubric and a list of Tier II vocabulary words, the students will grade someone else’s paper. Evaluating other student’s work not only gives the writer immediate feedback from a peer, but it also deepens the understanding and strengthens the skill in question of the evaluator. Use editing marks if needed. Make the criteria

26 Give the students fifteen minutes to write, give or take. Then have the students share with ONE other person. Depending on your class, you split them up anyway you like. I would try to make sure that they are not too chummy. Let them share with the rest of the class! Speaking is a hidden part of the ELA discipline. Practice this as much as possible. Socializing will be beneficial in deepening their understanding.

27 The next day can just be a continuation of the essay, delving into the organization of claims, facts, counter- arguments, and rebuttals. Do not become attached to a time frame. Complete the entire first draft by the end of the week. It is due when you feel the students have exhibited quality effort and progress in meeting the standard. Overall, the students just need practice be detail- oriented in regards to dissecting arguments. Is the claim backed up by a fact? Is the fact supported by evidence? Is the evidence relevant to the problem in question?

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