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WHAT I DID OVER SUMMER BREAK (AND WHAT THIS MEANS FOR YOU!) Betzy Willis Standards Objectives RESOURCES Activities/Investigations ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Research.

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Presentation on theme: "WHAT I DID OVER SUMMER BREAK (AND WHAT THIS MEANS FOR YOU!) Betzy Willis Standards Objectives RESOURCES Activities/Investigations ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Research."— Presentation transcript:

1 WHAT I DID OVER SUMMER BREAK (AND WHAT THIS MEANS FOR YOU!) Betzy Willis Standards Objectives RESOURCES Activities/Investigations ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Research Standard 6.B.1a- Based on data from research, identify and describe how natural processes change the environment. Cyclic climate changes Sedimentation in watersheds Population cycles extinction I wish to thank the following for their assistance and their outstanding work and research in their fields: Dr. Paulinus Chigbu, CISCEP Director Dr. Andrea Johnson, CISCEP Associate Director Kerrie Bunting Program Coordinators Christopher Daniels, CISCEP Boat Captain Faculty Mentors:Doctoral Students: Dr. Patricia GosleeFred Oseji Dr. Eric MayXavier Henry Dr. Madhumi Mitra Heather Wolfer Dr. Joseph PitulaEfe Oghenekaro Dr. Yan Waguespack Upon completion of this unit, YOU should be able to: -describe in pictures, numbers, words, and labeled diagrams, the school yard impervious surfaces, sediment pond, and Trolley Trail. demonstrate an understanding of the concepts runoff, watershed and sub-water sheds, water quality, and land use. understand how runoff accumulates various materials (including pollutants) and collects into a larger body of water. analyze data in order to determine relationships between land uses and nutrient concentration. and create an informational door -hanger to educate the community about ways to reduce runoff CMS student creek snorkeling on the Cooper’s Branch along the Trolley Trail. Part of Patapsco River sub-watershed. I learned A LOT about runoff, nutrients, microorganisms, and their impact on local water sheds and the larger watershed of the Bay and costal bays. You will too! This year you will research information on the Chesapeake Bay watershed. You will identify on a map the five states that make up the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, and the area that makes up our local sub-watershed of the Patapsco River. You will expand your knowledge to include the different types of land uses, surfaces, stormwater, and will research the impact of nutrient run off from these land uses and surfaces on the Patapsco River and the Bay. Google images for photos Field Connections CREST developed the Coastal Marine Sciences (CMARS) workshop to promote environmental literacy among high school and middle school teachers and students by infusing ocean science educational materials into the existing curricula. During the workshop, I participated in activities that are aligned with State and National Standards, and that meet the Middle and High School Assessment (MSA and HSA) requirements. Some of the goals of this workshop were to (1) increase the pool of teachers [ME!] that are highly trained, technologically literate and knowledgeable of the coastal bay marine environment, (2) create a support system for teachers through collaboration with UMES faculty and partners, (3) become a major research resource, and partner with institutions, state agencies, and industry for understanding, modeling and predicting the impacts of land use and climate variability in the mid-Atlantic region, and (4) improve public awareness and literacy of coastal aquatic ecosystems and impacts on them by anthropogenic activities and climate variability disciplines. “Teacher Camp” was GREAT! Excess amounts of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and sediment are the main contributors to poor water quality. These pollutants mainly enter our waters through surface runoff (water draining off of the land), and through groundwater (water that is stored underground). Poor water quality is characterized by low dissolved oxygen (DO), cloudiness of the water, excess amounts of N and P, and undesirable populations of micro-organisms, fish, and insects. You will investigate stormwater runoff at CMS and how it affects our local waters of the Cooper’s Branch and Patapsco River. Chesapeake Bay Watershed Patapsco River Sub- Watershed A watershed is an area of land from which rainwater and snowmelt drain into a particular body of water. Watersheds may be small areas of land (schoolyard) that drain water into streams (Cooper’s Branch) or rivers or huge areas of land that drain into larger rivers (Patapsco), estuaries (Chesapeake Bay) or deltas. Within each watershed, there are many smaller watersheds or sub-watersheds. A watershed is usually named after the stream or river it drains into. By defining the boundary of a watershed, people can determine what type of pollution affects a body of water and the source of the pollution. What is a Watershed ? YOU WILL RESEARCH TOPICS LIKE: Objective: -Students will become familiar with the terms, impervious, runoff, watershed, and land use. -Students will understand how runoff accumulates various materials (including pollutants) that collect into a larger body of water. Students will investigate the organisms that live in the Sediment Pond and Cooper’s Branch. Students will gather and analyze data to determine the relationship between land uses and nutrient concentration. Students will investigate water samples from each source to look for micro-invertebrates and macro- invertebrates. Students will survey impervious surfaces and brainstorm ways to decrease the amount of impervious surface on the schoolyard throughout the school year. COOPER’S BRANCH SUB-WATERSHED Parking lot drain that leads into school sediment pond. Part of Cooper’s Branch sub- watershed. I participated in A LOT of field investigations and you will too! You will observe and describe the schoolyard and Trolley Trail. You will sample the water at both locations and test for nitrogen, dissolved oxygen, phosphates and microscopic organisms, and learn what they indicate about the quality of the water. You will use chemical testing kits, capture nets, microscopes and other tools scientists, such as chemists, ecologists, biologists, and geologists, use in the field and in the lab. Cooper’s Branch Watershed Arial view of CMS. Drain in side parking lot. Introduction I had the opportunity to participate in a two week workshop at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. Seven other teachers from the East Coast and I got to participate in research and hands on activities on the costal bay marine environment. We went on field trips to Chincoteague National Park, Assateague State Park, and Deal Island. We took water samples to test water quality and examined and identified microorganisms. I even got to catch fish and dissect them, and watch blue crabs shed their shells. Why is Poor Water Quality a Problem? Freshwater creatures that are in Coopers Branch.


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