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Assessment in Action: Fall 2012 S tudent A cademic A chievement C ommittee Co-Chairs Erik Huntsinger Pete Turner.

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Presentation on theme: "Assessment in Action: Fall 2012 S tudent A cademic A chievement C ommittee Co-Chairs Erik Huntsinger Pete Turner."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Assessment in Action: Fall 2012 S tudent A cademic A chievement C ommittee Co-Chairs Erik Huntsinger Pete Turner

3 What We’re Learning.. Levels I & II (8:30-10:15) -Think, Pair, Share -Learning College -Bloom’s Taxonomy -Gen Ed Abilities Level I (10:30-11:30) Formative v Summative Course v Program Learning College Level II (10:30-11:30) Assessment Project CATS

4 Egg Plant

5 Think, Pair, Whole Group Share (Erik)

6 Dr. Pepper

7 Learning College (Pete)  Roots  Basic Principles  Assessment Connection

8 Roots  Philosophical beginnings – shift from faculty needs to student outcomes  George Boggs  Terry O’Banion  League for Innovation League for Innovation Initiative (The Learning, n.d.)  Learning College Project  Vanguard Colleges  Exemplars Learning College Principles  Purveyors of Best Practices

9 Basic Principles  “Places learning first and provides educational experiences for learners anyway, any place, any time” (The Learning, n.d.)  Focus on teaching and learning  Learner centered – college commitment of:  Resources  Energies  Actions - for continual improvement

10 Areas of Emphasis – The Learning College Organizational Culture Staff Recruitment & Development Technology Learning Outcomes Student Engagement

11 Learning College Assessment ?

12 Partner Prediction  Turn to your partner and ask: What do you think the connection is between the Learning College and Assessment?  When called on to share, say “My partner ____________ predicted:___________”

13 So... What is Assessment?  The informal and formal gathering of student data to assess student learning.  “Classroom Assessment helps individual college teachers obtain useful feedback on what, how much, and how well their students are learning” (Angelo & Cross, 1993)

14 Why Assessment? Source: Classroom Assessment and Grading that Work, Marzano, 2006 It’s all about LEARNING!!

15 I-pod

16 Bloom’s Levels of Thinking

17 Domains of Learning

18 Bloom’s Levels – Why?  Better lesson objective/design  Foster creative thinking  Better questioning strategies  More complete student assessment  Familiar w/Terminology  EMCC Core Value – Development of Critical Thinking Skills

19 Bloom’s Levels – What?  Remember (Knowledge)  Understand (Comprehension)  Apply  Analyze  Evaluate  Create (Synthesize) R U An Apple-Eating Crocodile?

20 Bloom’s Levels - Remember  Behaviors (Can students recall?):  Name  List  Write  Define  Repeat  Show  Recall  Questions/Prompts (Eliciting factual answers, testing recall and recognition):  Who, where, what, why, when, etc.  Describe  How, how much  Define  Which one  Reproduce

21 Bloom’s Levels – Understand ( Comprehension )  Behaviors (Can students explain?):  Summarize  Illustrate  Describe  Paraphrase  Explain  Questions/Prompts (Translating, interpreting, and extrapolating):  Indicate  Summarize  Explain  Define  Give example  Translate

22 Bloom’s Levels – Apply  Behaviors (Can students use ideas?):  Solve  Demonstrate  Apply  Model  Use  Construct  Compute  Questions/Prompts (Use in situations that are new, unfamiliar):  Apply  Construct  Demonstrate  Illustrate  What would...  What uses...

23 Bloom’s Levels - Analyze  Behaviors (Can students see relationships?):  Categorize  Contrast  Take Apart  Separate  Compare  Dissect  Questions/Prompts (Breaking down into parts, relating parts to the whole)  Dissect  Contrast  Separate  Distinguish  Classify  Graph

24 Bloom’s Levels - Evaluate  Behaviors (Can students make judgments and support them?):  Debate  Justify  Judge  Criticize  Support  Conclude  Questions/Prompts (Judging according to some set of criterion and stating why):  Editorialize  Dispute  Defend  Choose why  Verify  Evaluate

25 Bloom’s Levels – Create (Synthesis)  Behaviors (Can students combine and create a new entity?):  Synthesize  Invent  Develop  Compose  Imagine  Improve  Questions/Prompts (Combining elements into a pattern not seen before):  Design  Forecast  Build  Predict  Make up  Hypothesize

26 Light Beer

27 Level I Workshop  Formative v. Summative  Course, Program, and College  Learning College (again!)

28 Assessment and Student Learning Assessments that encourage learning  Students track their own progress  Specific measurement topics  Use Graphs  Engage students in self-reflection  The method of mounting evidence: Averaging Scores = Final Achievement (Marzano, 2006)

29 Assessment, Continued FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT:  Used while instruction is occurring  Information gathered by teacher to inform instruction SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT:  Information gathered at the end of a unit for purpose of judging outcome

30 Whole Class Project Formative Assessments  Summative Assessments 

31 Most Effective Assessment? FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT :  “The gains in achievement are … among the largest ever reported for educational interventions” Black & William, 1998 AUTHENTIC ASSESSMENT  “Authentic learning mirrors the tasks and problem solving that are required in the reality outside of school“ Ormiston, 2011 Performances/ Demonstrations Simulations/ Role Plays Portfolios w/ Strategic Selections Life-connected Research w/ Exhibitions

32 Gatorade

33 Course, Program, College Formative or Summative? Course Assessments:  Unit  Mid-Term  Final Program  Common Final  Student Success College  Completion  Certificates  Student Satisfaction

34 Nightmare

35 Learning College Characteristics with regards to Faculty Actions:  Authentic Assessment  Experiential Learning  Sharing  “Passionate Innovators”  Always seeking better ways to increase learning  “Collaborative communities of learning and practice”

36 References  Angelo, T.A. & Cross, K.P. (1998). Classroom assessment techniques: A handbook for college teachers (2 nd Ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.  Huber, M.T. (2008). The promise of faculty inquiry for teaching and learning basic skills. A Report from the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: Strengthening Pre-Collegiate Education in Community Colleges. Retrieved from:  The Learning College Project (n.d.). The League for Innovation in the Community College. Retrieved from:  Marzano, R. (2006). Classroom assessment and grading that work. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.  Ormiston, Meg (2011). Creating a digital-rich classroom: Teaching & learning in a Web 2.0 World. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree.  Reeves, D. B. (2008). Reframing teacher leadership to improve your school. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.  Turner, R. (2003). A pragmatic approach to educating: Connecting problem- based learning to service learning. Dissertation, Capella University. UMI #

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