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Hank Childs, University of Oregon Oct. 22 nd, 2014 CIS 441/541: Introduction to Computer Graphics Lecture 7: Arbitrary Camera Positions.

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Presentation on theme: "Hank Childs, University of Oregon Oct. 22 nd, 2014 CIS 441/541: Introduction to Computer Graphics Lecture 7: Arbitrary Camera Positions."— Presentation transcript:

1 Hank Childs, University of Oregon Oct. 22 nd, 2014 CIS 441/541: Introduction to Computer Graphics Lecture 7: Arbitrary Camera Positions

2 What am I missing?  1C redux submission  1D redux  ???

3 Grading  All 1B’s graded  Rubrics:  I really intend for you to get “0 pixels difference”  Anything less than that can be very problematic to grade.  Looks like some submissions with >0 pixels  I will be contacting people about these

4 Upcoming Schedule  IEEE Vis Nov 8-13  Class canceled Nov 12  Class held Nov 14  SuperComputer Nov  Midterm Nov 19  Class held Nov 21  HiPC Dec. 10+  Get Final projects in on time  Final late policy: 20% off for 1 day late, 50% off thereafter

5 Project #1E (7%), Due Mon 10/27  Goal: add Phong shading  Extend your project1D code  File proj1e_geometry.vtk available on web (9MB)  File “reader1e.cxx” has code to read triangles from file.  No Cmake, project1e.cxx

6 Changes to data structures class Triangle { public: double X[3], Y[3], Z[3]; double colors[3][3]; double normals[3][3]; };  reader1e.cxx will not compile until you make these changes  reader1e.cxx will initialize normals at each vertex

7 More comments  New: more data to help debug  I will make the shading value for each pixel available.  I will also make it available for ambient, diffuse, specular.  Don’t forget to do two-sided lighting  This project in a nutshell:  LERP normal to a pixel You all are great at this now!!  Add method called “CalculateShading”. My version of CalculateShading is about ten lines of code.  Modify RGB calculation to use shading.

8 Outline  Review: Basic Transformations  Arbitrary Camera Positions Note: Ken Joy’s graphics notes are fantastic

9 Outline  Review: Basic Transformations  Arbitrary Camera Positions

10 Starting easy … two-dimensional (a b) (x) (a*x + b*y) (c d) X (y) = (c*x + d*y) MP = P’ Matrix M transforms point P to make new point P’. M takes point (x,y) to point (a*x+b*y, c*x+d*y) M takes point (x,y) to point (a*x+b*y, c*x+d*y)

11 (1 0) (x) (x) (0 1) X (y) = (y) MP = P’ Matrix M transforms point P to make new point P. Identity Matrix

12 (2 0) (x) (2x) (0 1) X (y) = (y) MP = P’ Matrix M transforms point P to make new point P. Scale in X, not in Y (x,y) (2x,y)

13 (s 0) (x) (sx) (0 t) X (y) = (ty) MP = P’ Matrix M transforms point P to make new point P. Scale in both dimensions (x,y) (sx,ty)

14 (0 1) (x) (y) (1 0) X (y) = (x) MP = P’ Matrix M transforms point P to make new point P. Switch X and Y (x,y) (y,x)

15 (0 1) (x) (y) (-1 0) X (y) = (-x) MP = P’ Matrix M transforms point P to make new point P. Rotate 90 degrees clockwise (x,y) (y,-x)

16 (0 -1) (x) (-y) (1 0) X (y) = (x) MP = P’ Matrix M transforms point P to make new point P. Rotate 90 degrees counter- clockwise (x,y) (-y,x)

17 (cos(a) sin(a)) (x) (cos(a)*x+sin(a)*y)) (-sin(a) cos(a)) X (y) = (-sin(a)*x+cos(a)*y) MP = P’ Matrix M transforms point P to make new point P. Rotate “a” degrees counter- clockwise (x,y) (x’, y’) a

18 Combining transformations  How do we rotate by 90 degrees clockwise and then scale X by 2?  Answer: multiply by matrix that multiplies by 90 degrees clockwise, then multiply by matrix that scales X by 2.  But can we do this efficiently? (0 1) (2 0) (0 1) (-1 0) X (0 1) = (-2 0)

19 Reminder: matrix multiplication (a b) (e f) (a*e+b*g a*f+b*h) (c d) X (g h) = (c*e+d*g c*f+d*h)

20 Combining transformations  How do we rotate by 90 degrees clockwise and then scale X by 2?  Answer: multiply by matrix that rotates by 90 degrees clockwise, then multiply by matrix that scales X by 2.  But can we do this efficiently? (0 1) (2 0) (0 1) (-1 0) X (0 1) = (-2 0)

21 Combining transformations  How do we scale X by 2 and then rotate by 90 degrees clockwise?  Answer: multiply by matrix that scales X by 2, then multiply by matrix that rotates 90 degrees clockwise. (2 0) (0 1) (0 2) (0 1) X (-1 0) = (-1 0) (0 1) (2 0) (0 1) (-1 0) X (0 1) = (-2 0) Multiply then scale Order matters!!

22 Translations  Translation is harder: (a) (c) (a+c) (b) + (d) = (b+d) But this doesn’t fit our nice matrix multiply model… What to do??

23 Outline  Review: Basic Transformations  Arbitrary Camera Positions Note: Ken Joy’s graphics notes are fantastic

24 Our goal World space: Triangles in native Cartesian coordinates Camera located anywhere O Camera space: Camera located at origin, looking down -Z Triangle coordinates relative to camera frame O Image space: All viewable objects within -1 <= x,y,z <= +1 x y z Screen space: All viewable objects within -1 <= x, y <= +1 Device space: All viewable objects within 0<=x<=width, 0 <=y<=height

25 Our goal World space: Triangles in native Cartesian coordinates Camera located anywhere O Camera space: Camera located at origin, looking down -Z Triangle coordinates relative to camera frame O Image space: All viewable objects within -1 <= x,y,z <= +1 x y z Screen space: All viewable objects within -1 <= x, y <= +1 Device space: All viewable objects within 0<=x<=width, 0 <=y<=height

26 World Space  World Space is the space defined by the user’s coordinate system.  This space contains the portion of the scene that is transformed into image space by the camera transform.  It is normally left to the user to specify the bounds on this space.

27 Our goal World space: Triangles in native Cartesian coordinates Camera located anywhere O Camera space: Camera located at origin, looking down -Z Triangle coordinates relative to camera frame O Image space: All viewable objects within -1 <= x,y,z <= +1 x y z Screen space: All viewable objects within -1 <= x, y <= +1 Device space: All viewable objects within 0<=x<=width, 0 <=y<=height Camera Transform

28 Our goal World space: Triangles in native Cartesian coordinates Camera located anywhere O Camera space: Camera located at origin, looking down -Z Triangle coordinates relative to camera frame O Image space: All viewable objects within -1 <= x,y,z <= +1 x y z Screen space: All viewable objects within -1 <= x, y <= +1 Device space: All viewable objects within 0<=x<=width, 0 <=y<=height View Transform

29 World Space  World Space is the space defined by the user’s coordinate system.  This space contains the portion of the scene that is transformed into image space by the camera transform.  It is normally left to the user to specify the bounds on this space.

30 Our goal World space: Triangles in native Cartesian coordinates Camera located anywhere O Camera space: Camera located at origin, looking down -Z Triangle coordinates relative to camera frame O Image space: All viewable objects within -1 <= x,y,z <= +1 x y z Screen space: All viewable objects within -1 <= x, y <= +1 Device space: All viewable objects within 0<=x<=width, 0 <=y<=height

31 How do we specify a camera? The “viewing pyramid” or “view frustum”. Frustum: In geometry, a frustum (plural: frusta or frustums) is the portion of a solid (normally a cone or pyramid) that lies between two parallel planes cutting it.

32 Our goal World space: Triangles in native Cartesian coordinates Camera located anywhere O Camera space: Camera located at origin, looking down -Z Triangle coordinates relative to camera frame O Image space: All viewable objects within -1 <= x,y,z <= +1 x y z Screen space: All viewable objects within -1 <= x, y <= +1 Device space: All viewable objects within 0<=x<=width, 0 <=y<=height

33 Image Space  Image Space is the three-dimensional coordinate system that contains screen space.  It is the space where the camera transformation directs its output.  The bounds of Image Space are 3-dimensional cube. {(x,y,z) : − 1≤x≤1, − 1≤y≤1, − 1≤z≤1}

34 Image Space Diagram Up X=1 X = -1 Y=1 Y = -1 Z=1 Z = -1

35 Our goal World space: Triangles in native Cartesian coordinates Camera located anywhere O Camera space: Camera located at origin, looking down -Z Triangle coordinates relative to camera frame O Image space: All viewable objects within -1 <= x,y,z <= +1 x y z Screen space: All viewable objects within -1 <= x, y <= +1 Device space: All viewable objects within 0<=x<=width, 0 <=y<=height

36 Screen Space  Screen Space is the intersection of the xy-plane with Image Space.  Points in image space are mapped into screen space by projecting via a parallel projection, onto the plane z = 0.  Example:  a point (0, 0, z) in image space will project to the center of the display screen

37 Screen Space Diagram X +1 Y +1

38 Our goal World space: Triangles in native Cartesian coordinates Camera located anywhere O Camera space: Camera located at origin, looking down -Z Triangle coordinates relative to camera frame O Image space: All viewable objects within -1 <= x,y,z <= +1 x y z Screen space: All viewable objects within -1 <= x, y <= +1 Device space: All viewable objects within 0<=x<=width, 0 <=y<=height

39 Device Space  Device Space is the lowest level coordinate system and is the closest to the hardware coordinate systems of the device itself.  Device space is usually defined to be the n × m array of pixels that represent the area of the screen.  A coordinate system is imposed on this space by labeling the lower-left-hand corner of the array as (0,0), with each pixel having unit length and width.

40 Device Space Example

41 Device Space With Depth Information  Extends Device Space to three dimensions by adding z-coordinate of image space.  Coordinates are (x, y, z) with 0 ≤ x ≤ n 0 ≤ y ≤ m z arbitrary (but typically -1 ≤ z ≤ +1)

42 Easiest Transform World space: Triangles in native Cartesian coordinates Camera located anywhere O Camera space: Camera located at origin, looking down -Z Triangle coordinates relative to camera frame O Image space: All viewable objects within -1 <= x,y,z <= +1 x y z Screen space: All viewable objects within -1 <= x, y <= +1 Device space: All viewable objects within 0<=x<=width, 0 <=y<=height

43 Image Space to Device Space  (x, y, z)  ( x’, y’, z’), where  x’ = n*(x+1)/2  y’ = m*(y+1)/2  z’ = z  (for an n x m image)  Matrix: (x’ 0 0 0) (0 y’ 0 0) (0 0 z’ 0) ( )

44 (a little more review)

45 New terms  Coordinate system:  A system that uses coordinates to establish position  Example: (3, 4, 6) really means…  3x(1,0,0)  4x(0,1,0)  6x(0,0,1)  Since we assume the Cartesian coordinate system

46 New terms  Frame:  A way to place a coordinate system into a specific location in a space  Cartesian example: (3,4,6)  It is assumed that we are speaking in reference to the origin (location (0,0,0)).  A frame F is a collection (v1, v2, …, vn, O) is a frame over a space if (v1, v2, … vn) form a basis over that space.  What is a basis??  linear algebra term

47 What does it mean to form a basis?  For any vector v, there are unique coordinates (c1, …, cn) such that v = c1*v1 + c2*v2 + … + cn*vn

48 What does it mean to form a basis?  For any vector v, there are unique coordinates (c1, …, cn) such that v = c1*v1 + c2*v2 + … + cn*vn  Consider some point P.  The basis has an origin O  There is a vector v such that O+v = P  We know we can construct v using a combination of vi’s  Therefore we can represent P in our frame using the coordinates (c1, c2, …, cn)

49 Example of Frames  Frame F = (v1, v2, O)  v1 = (0, -1)  v2 = (1, 0)  O = (3, 4)  What are F’s coordinates for the point (6, 6)?

50 Example of Frames  Frame F = (v1, v2, O)  v1 = (0, -1)  v2 = (1, 0)  O = (3, 4)  What are F’s coordinates for the point (6, 6)?  Answer: (-2, 3)

51 Translations  Translation is harder: (a) (c) (a+c) (b) + (d) = (b+d) But this doesn’t fit our nice matrix multiply model… What to do??

52 Homogeneous Coordinates (1 0 0) (x) (x) (0 1 0) X (y) = (y) (0 0 1) (1) = (1) Add an extra dimension. A math trick … don’t overthink it.

53 Homogeneous Coordinates (1 0 dx) (x) (x+dx) (0 1 dy) X (y) = (y+dy) (0 0 1) (1) (1) Translation We can now fit translation into our matrix multiplication system.

54 (now new content)

55 Homogeneous Coordinates  Defined: a system of coordinates used in projective geometry, as Cartesian coordinates are used in Euclidean geometry  Primary uses:  4 × 4 matrices to represent general 3-dimensional transformations  it allows a simplified representation of mathematical functions – the rational form – in which rational  We only care about the first  I don’t really even know what the second use means

56 Interpretation of Homogeneous Coordinates  4D points: (x, y, z, w)  Our typical frame: (x, y, z, 1)

57 Interpretation of Homogeneous Coordinates  4D points: (x, y, z, w)  Our typical frame: (x, y, z, 1) Our typical frame in the context of 4D points So how to treat points not along the w=1 line?

58 Projecting back to w=1 line  Let P = (x, y, z, w) be a 4D point with w != 1  Goal: find P’ = (x’, y’, z’, 1) such P projects to P’  (We have to define what it means to project)  Idea for projection:  Draw line from P to origin.  If Q is along that line (and Q.w == 1), then Q is a projection of P

59 Projecting back to w==1 line  Idea for projection:  Draw line from P to origin.  If Q is along that line (and Q.w == 1), then Q is a projection of P

60 So what is Q?  Similar triangles argument:  x’ = x/w  y’ = y/w  z’ = z/w

61 Our goal World space: Triangles in native Cartesian coordinates Camera located anywhere O Camera space: Camera located at origin, looking down -Z Triangle coordinates relative to camera frame O -Z  Need to construct a Camera Frame  Need to construct a matrix to transform points from Cartesian Frame to Camera Frame  Transform triangle by transforming its three vertices

62 Basis pt 2 (more linear algebra-y this time)  Camera frame must be a basis:  Spans space … can get any point through a linear combination of basis functions  Every member must be linearly independent

63 Camera frame construction  Must choose (v1,v2,v3,O)  O = camera position  v3 = O-focus  Not “focus-O”, since we want to look down -Z Camera space: Camera located at origin, looking down -Z Triangle coordinates relative to camera frame O -Z

64 What is the up axis?  Up axis is the direction from the base of your nose to your forehead Up

65 What is the up axis?  Up axis is the direction from the base of your nose to your forehead + =

66 What is the up axis?  Up axis is the direction from the base of your nose to your forehead  (if you lie down while watching TV, the screen is sideways) + =

67 Camera frame construction  Must choose (v1,v2,v3,O)  O = camera position  v3 = O-focus  v2 = up  v1 = up x (O-focus) Camera space: Camera located at origin, looking down -Z Triangle coordinates relative to camera frame O -Z

68 But wait … what if dot(v2,v3) != 0?  We can get around this with two cross products:  v1 = Up x (O-focus)  v2 = (O-focus) x v1 O-focus Up

69 Camera frame summarized  O = camera position  v1 = Up x (O-focus)  v2 = (O-focus) x v1  v3 = O-focus

70 Our goal World space: Triangles in native Cartesian coordinates Camera located anywhere O Camera space: Camera located at origin, looking down -Z Triangle coordinates relative to camera frame O -Z  Need to construct a Camera Frame  ✔  Need to construct a matrix to transform points from Cartesian Frame to Camera Frame  Transform triangle by transforming its three vertices

71 The Two Frames of the Camera Transform  Our two frames:  Cartesian:   (0,0,0)  Camera:  v1 = up x (O-focus)  v2 = (O-focus) x u  v3 = (O-focus)  O

72 The Two Frames of the Camera Transform  Our two frames:  Cartesian:   (0,0,0)  Camera:  v1 = up x (O-focus)  v2 = (O-focus) x u  v3 = (O-focus)  O Camera is a Frame, so we can express any vector in Cartesian as a combination of v1, v2, and v3.

73 Converting From Cartesian Frame To Camera Frame  The Cartesian vector can be represented as some combination of the Camera basis functions v1, v2, v3:  = e1,1 * v1 + e1,2 * v2 + e1,3 * v3  So can the Cartesian vector  = e2,1 * v1 + e2,2 * v2 + e2,3 * v3  So can the Cartesian vector  = e3,1 * v1 + e3,2 * v2 + e3,3 * v3  So can the vector: Cartesian origin – Camera origin  (0,0,0) - O = e4,1 * v1 + e4,2 * v2 + e4,3 * v3   (0,0,0) = e4,1 * v1 + e4,2 * v2 + e4,3 * v3 + O

74 Putting Our Equations Into Matrix Form  = e1,1 * v1 + e1,2 * v2 + e1,3 * v3  = e2,1 * v1 + e2,2 * v2 + e2,3 * v3  = e3,1 * v1 + e3,2 * v2 + e3,3 * v3  (0,0,0) = e4,1 * v1 + e4,2 * v2 + e4,3 * v3 + O   [ ] [e1,1 e1,2 e1,3 0] [v1]  [ ] [e2,1 e2,2 e2,3 0] [v2]  [ ] = [e3,1 e3,2 e3,3 0] [v3]  (0,0,0) [e4,1 e4,2 e4,3 1] [O]

75 Here Comes The Trick…  Consider the meaning of Cartesian coordinates (x,y,z): [x y z 1][ ] [ ] = (x,y,z) [ ] [(0,0,0)] But: [ ] [e1,1 e1,2 e1,3 0] [v1] [ ] [e2,1 e2,2 e2,3 0] [v2] [ ] = [e3,1 e3,2 e3,3 0] [v3] (0,0,0) [e4,1 e4,2 e4,3 1] [O]

76 Here Comes The Trick… But: [ ] [e1,1 e1,2 e1,3 0] [v1] [x y z 1][ ] [x y z 1] [e2,1 e2,2 e2,3 0] [v2] [ ] = [e3,1 e3,2 e3,3 0] [v3] [(0,0,0)] [e4,1 e4,2 e4,3 1] [O] Coordinates of (x,y,z) with respect to Cartesian frame. Coordinates of (x,y,z) with respect to Camera frame. So this matrix is the camera transform!!

77 Solving the Camera Transform [e1,1 e1,2 e1,3 0] [v1.x v2.x v3.x 0] [e2,1 e2,2 e2,3 0] [v1.y v2.y v3.y 0] [e3,1 e3,2 e3,3 0] = [v1.z v2.z v3.z 0] [e4,1 e4,2 e4,3 1] [v1. t v2. t v3. t 1] Where t = (0,0,0)-O How do we know?: Cramer’s Rule + simplifications Want to derive?: GraphicsNotes/Camera-Transform/Camera- Transform.html


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