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1 C Fundamentals - I Math 130 Lecture # 2 B Smith: Sp05: With discussion on labs, this took 53 minutes. Score 3. Many caveats. B Smith: Sp05: With discussion.

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Presentation on theme: "1 C Fundamentals - I Math 130 Lecture # 2 B Smith: Sp05: With discussion on labs, this took 53 minutes. Score 3. Many caveats. B Smith: Sp05: With discussion."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 C Fundamentals - I Math 130 Lecture # 2 B Smith: Sp05: With discussion on labs, this took 53 minutes. Score 3. Many caveats. B Smith: Sp05: With discussion on labs, this took 53 minutes. Score 3. Many caveats. B Smith: Fa05: Timing about right B Smith: Fa05: Timing about right B Smith: Sp06: Used Dev-C for most things here and had students do the hands-on experimentation stuff. Rate: 3. Good, practical, programming. B Smith: Sp06: Used Dev-C for most things here and had students do the hands-on experimentation stuff. Rate: 3. Good, practical, programming.

2 2 Administrivia Lab 1 should be submitted by end of lab today See Blackboard for next few labs  Lab 2 due Friday, Sept 2  Lab 3 due Friday, Sept 9

3 3 Overview Define basic data type Evaluate Arithmetic Expressions using C

4 4 Basic data types in C Integer: 2, -50, +2, -2 Floating point: 0.331, , 1.0, +1. Double precision: 6 – 7 digits precision Character: ‘W’, ‘w’, ‘+’, ‘&’ Exponential Notation 5.123e-7

5 5 Integers (2, -50, +2, -2, etc.) A positive or negative number  with no fractional part or (no decimal point.) From the American Heritage dictionary:  A member of the set of positive whole numbers {1, 2, 3,... }, negative whole numbers {-1, -2, -3,... }, and zero {0} Can be “signed” or “unsigned” 5622 ok, but not ?  There is a limit to the size of allowed integer types B Smith: Show table (list) as an example: If we have only 6 spots available, you can have signed: -3,-2,-1,0,1,2 or unsigned: 0,1,2,4,5,6 B Smith: Show table (list) as an example: If we have only 6 spots available, you can have signed: -3,-2,-1,0,1,2 or unsigned: 0,1,2,4,5,6 B Smith: not covered Fa 05 B Smith: not covered Fa 05

6 6 Arithmetic Expressions take arithmetic (numerical) values and return an arithmetic (numerical) value Are composed using the following operators: + (unary plus) - (unary minus) + (addition) - (subtraction) * (multiplication) / (division or quotient) % (modulus or remainder) L01a.c B Smith: This is a great opportunity to start using a debugger in class to show variable changes. This would be an alternative to using printf to trace through a program! B Smith: This is a great opportunity to start using a debugger in class to show variable changes. This would be an alternative to using printf to trace through a program!

7 7 Unary operators Called unary because they require one operand. Examples i = +1;/* + used as a unary operator */ j = -i;/* - used as a unary operator */ The unary operator ‘+’ does nothing  just emphasis that a numeric constant is positive. The unary operator ‘–’ produces the negative of its operand.

8 8 Precedence in Expressions Defines the order in which an expression is evaluated As in algebra we need rules regarding what gets done first Write down your answers to the following:

9 9 Precedence in Expressions * / 5 = P stands for parentheses, E for Exponents, M for multiplication D for division, A for addition, and S for subtraction. P.E.M.D.A.S. 1 + (2 * 3) - (4 / 5)

10 10 More on precedence *, /, % are at the same level of precedence +, - are at the same level of precedence For operators at the same “level,” left-to-right ordering is applied – 1 = (2 + 3) – 1 = 4 2 – = (2 – 3) + 1 = 0 2 * 3 / 4 = (2 * 3) / 4 = 6 / 4 2 / 3 * 4 = (2 / 3) * 4 = 0 / 4 B Smith: Provide an example for next slide. Your turn... B Smith: Provide an example for next slide. Your turn...

11 11 Precedence in Expressions – Example (cont) * / 5 = 1 + (2 * 3) - (4 / 5) B Smith: This entire sequence can be covered on 1 slide using a tablet B Smith: This entire sequence can be covered on 1 slide using a tablet

12 12 Precedence in Expressions – Example (cont) * / 5 = 1 + (2 * 3) - (4 / 5)

13 13 Precedence in Expressions – Example (cont) Integer division results in integer quotient * / 5 = 1 + (2 * 3) - (4 / 5)

14 14 Precedence in Expressions – Example (cont) = * / 5 = 1 + (2 * 3) - (4 / 5)

15 15 Precedence in Expressions – Example (cont) * / 5 = 1 + (2 * 3) - (4 / 5)

16 16 int -s and float -s float is a “communicable” type Example: * / 5 = 1 + (2 * 3) - (4.0 / 5) = = 6.2 B Smith: Redundant since done on board with tablet. Consider writing out line 1 and finishing live B Smith: Redundant since done on board with tablet. Consider writing out line 1 and finishing live

17 17 int -s and float -s – Example 2 (1 + 2) * (3 - 4) / 5 = ((1 + 2) * (3 - 4)) / 5 = (3 * -1) / 5 = -3 / 5 = 0

18 18 int -s and float -s – Example 2 (cont) ( ) * (3 - 4) / 5 = (( ) * (3 - 4)) / 5 = (3.0 * -1) / 5 = -3.0 / 5 = -0.6

19 19 int -s and float -s – Example 3 ( ) * ((3 - 4) / 5) = ( ) * (-1 / 5) = 3.0 * 0 = 0.0

20 20 Floating Point and Exponential Notation (e.g e4, 3.1e-3, 7e0) Generally written in exponential format  i.e., 3000 would be 3e3 and  1/1000 or would be 1e-3 the precision of the floating-point representation is determined by the number of digits the computer will allow for the decimal part of the mantissa  i.e. in 2.555e4, is the mantissa Whereas the the range of the floating-point representation is based on the number of digits the computer allows for the exponent  i.e., in 2.555e4, 4 is the exponent

21 21 Summary Defined basic data type Evaluated Arithmetic Expressions using C Read chapter 2 of your book and review lectures notes


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