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How to Grade for Learning by Using 15 Fixes for Broken Grades – and PowerSchool Part 2 Chapel Hill, NC November 14-15, 2013 Presented by Ken O ’ Connor.

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Presentation on theme: "How to Grade for Learning by Using 15 Fixes for Broken Grades – and PowerSchool Part 2 Chapel Hill, NC November 14-15, 2013 Presented by Ken O ’ Connor."— Presentation transcript:

1 How to Grade for Learning by Using 15 Fixes for Broken Grades – and PowerSchool Part 2 Chapel Hill, NC November 14-15, 2013 Presented by Ken O ’ Connor Assess for Success Consulting

2 Fair Reporting Honors idiosyncrasies and appropriate extenuating circumstances Fair reports don ’ t compare apples and oranges. ( “ behind ” with “ different developmental path ” ) Fair reports don ’ t emphasize narrow and arbitrary test types. Works consciously and carefully to eliminate bias and capriciousness. Fair reports don ’ t allow unconscious factors to influence teacher grading. Developed from original ideas presented by Grant Wiggins Six standards for quality according to Grant Wiggins 2

3 Honest Reporting Describes absolute levels of performance Honest reports state the level of performance against standards and make predictions about likely exit status. Honest reports provide balanced information including strengths and weaknesses. Developed from original ideas presented by Grant Wiggins Six standards for quality according to Grant Wiggins 3

4 Useful Reporting Refers to the reader ’ s ability to use the information Useful reports link back to clarity about purpose and audience. Useful to reader - not writer Useful reports accurately communicate students strengths and weaknesses Useful reports provide rich, timely, and accurate information. Developed from original ideas presented by Grant Wiggins Six standards for quality according to Grant Wiggins 4

5 Provides trustworthy and believable information for ALL constituencies Credible reports rely on disinterested scoring and grading on a regular basis. Credible reports reflect external validation in terms of tasks, criteria, and standards. Developed from original ideas presented by Grant Wiggins Credible Reporting Six standards for quality according to Grant Wiggins 5

6 Feasible Reporting Provides a manageable system for teachers Feasible reports are “ Do-Able. ” Feasible reports honor demands on teacher time. Developed from original ideas presented by Grant Wiggins Six standards for quality according to Grant Wiggins 6

7 User-Friendly Reporting Refers to intelligibility and ease of access of information User-friendly reports are free from educational jargon and opaque descriptors. User-friendly reports balance customary practices with expanded information. Developed from original ideas presented by Grant Wiggins Six standards for quality according to Grant Wiggins 7

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9 1.Part of an overall communication system that includes formal and informal opportunities to communicate student achievement, progress and behaviors (postcards, phone calls, conferences, etc). 9

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12 Communication System Issues/Concerns System? Coherent Informative Feasible 11

13 2.Focus on primary purpose – communication about achievement of standards. 12

14 13 Source: Medford School District, OR

15 Example of Purpose Statement “ Dear Parent or Guardian, This progress report is one component of communicating with you about your child ’ s progress in school. Through this report system along with parent teacher conferences, work samples and formal evaluations, we believe you will have a good understanding of your child ’ s progress in school. This progress report key reflects how your child is performing relative to end of year grade level standards. At the beginning of the year, most students are developing a level of understanding relative to these standards. As the year progresses, most students will make progress toward mastering these outcomes. The teaching staff and administration believe teachers and parents must work together to ensure students achieve their full potential. We hope that this report will encourage you to discuss questions and concerns you might have about your child ’ s progress in school. We look forward to our continued partnership with parents in providing the very best education for your child. ” 14

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17 Purpose Issues/Concerns Length Clarity Ideas/word choice/tone Parent friendly Link to Mission/Vision Where/Placement 15

18 3.Separate achievement from behavior/work ethic/habits of mind. 16

19 Shorewood School District, WI 17

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21 Work Habits/Behavior Issues/Concerns Title/ sub titles (not ‘ effort ’ - please!) How many? What? Description/explanation Performance standards - quality, frequency Who reports - overall or by subject? 18

22 4.De-emphasize overall subject grades; emphasize achievement of specific standards/benchmarks. 19

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24 Content Standards Issues/Concerns How many Level of specificity - strand or benchmark Grade level specific or several grades Parent friendly or state language ‘ Grades ’ for standards with or without subject grade 20

25 5.Clearly describe the performance standards (symbol systems) appropriate for each characteristic. 6.Distinguish clearly between achievement, growth, and progress. 21

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28 Performance Standards Issues/Concerns number of levels - 2 to 101, proficiency or numbers labels - words or symbols or both descriptors - clarity, richness - problem words - exceeds, all - progression between levels - consistency within a level achievement, growth or progress links to letter grades, grading scale when - at time of report or year end standards 23

29 7.Understandable by students and parents: - language readily understood; - format and design that enhances comprehension (ideally one page, two sides, ‘ clean ’ ). 8.Easy for teachers to use: - electronic template with pop-up menus; -easy to duplicate (8.5 x11 or 11x14); - flexible enough to meet diverse needs; 9.Frequent enough to provide timely information but not so frequent that reporting overwhelms parents and overburdens teachers (not more than 3 times per year). 24

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31 10. Information on lates/tardies and absences for school and each class. 11. Opportunities for parents, students, and teachers to be involved: - comments focused on strengths and areas for improvement; - student self assessment/reflection; - parental action and response; - next steps for parents, teachers, and students. 25

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