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1 Handouts: D2 Plng ref guide p. 1-2 Review of D1 HW CFS obj para
Sample obj paras 4MAT Effects of having/not literal data (from How to make Sup and Eval Really Work) HW Standards-based teaching (optional) Three-column notes (NB p. 80; optional) Blank paper for Handful summarizer (optional) D2 Content: Review of D1 HW Sup/eval and the PGS Planning/MO Obj para Literal notes/data Clarity / framing Etc: Video: Catherine / Valerie / Carol (pick one), Mara Posters: standards, beliefs, recipe, EBB Books: TST Notebook Cards for seating O&I table tents Name tags Seating: Random with playing cards Italics indicate standard HOs, stored in Terry’s office.

2 Objectives – Day 2 By the end of the day you will be able to:
Explain how supervision and evaluation support the purpose of the Professional Growth System. Explain different levels of thinking about lesson planning and their implications for student learning. Evaluate objectives based on the criteria for a mastery objective. Analyze evidence to determine if a teacher is planning and instructing for mastery. Write an objective paragraph in a post-observation conference report. Identify components of a teacher’s repertoire for framing learning and explain their importance to students. Explain the importance of literal note-taking and determine whether notes are literal or descriptive.

3 Itinerary – Day 2 Community builder / framing
Building our leadership vision Planning for mastery Writing about planning: the objective/planning paragraph Clarity: framing the big picture Data sources / literal notes Summary

4 Teacher beliefs influence teacher decisions and behaviors, and impact student opportunities and achievement. Clear understanding of standards by supervisors and those they supervise is the most direct path to superior teacher performance and thereby student achievement. The more we practice observing, note-taking, and analyzing teaching, the better at it we become. Feedback – information about our current level of performance as compared to a standard – is the only way to improve. In a standards-based classroom there are no secrets about what matters most. When teachers are clear on what student mastery will look like and sound like, they are able to share this clarity with students, and plan lessons that lead to mastery. When a lesson is taught for mastery, students are more engaged and more likely to learn. As supervisors/instructional leaders, we must lead our staff to a focus on student mastery. Teachers who frame the learning for students increase the likelihood of student learning. Different types of learners need different elements of framing. Since all types are present in our classes, we must frame in multiple ways. We cannot simply focus on what has the greatest meaning for us individually. There is a repertoire of strategies in each of the skill areas of clarity. We can all increase our repertoires, and be conscious of the match we’re making to our students and curricula.

5 FOUNDATION OF ESSENTIAL BELIEFS
Pyramid Partners Objectives Personal relationships Climate Expectations Principles of learning Clarity Attention Momentum Beliefs page xiii Overarching Objectives Curriculum Design Planning Objectives Learning Experiences Assessment Personal Relationship Building Page number checked 1/08 Class Climate Expectations Principles of Learning Models of Teaching Clarity Space Time Routines Attention Momentum Discipline FOUNDATION OF ESSENTIAL BELIEFS

6

7 Welcome! Sign in. Wear your name tag.
Pick the top card and sit at that numbered table. (A=1)

8 First steps on the journey…
What practices or concepts have become clearer to you as a result of today’s class? How will this knowledge support your growth as an instructional leader? First steps on the journey…

9 The knowledge base on teaching / triangle (10)
Practices or concepts that have become clearer to you and that will support your growth on the first steps on the journey : The knowledge base on teaching / triangle (10) Scripting – what it is, why we do it (8) The components of a report AKA “the recipe” (5) CEIJ (5) The six standards of the PGS (3)

10 +

11 + Pluses Sharing with partners, in groups, at tables (9)
Pacing/momentum (3) Exemplars (4) Class climate (4) Presenters +

12 Deltas Provide more processing time (2) Go faster / go slower

13 Ring Tone Revelations Tell your partner your phone number. They will call you. Share the name of your ring tone and why you chose it. Change roles. Be prepared to report on your partner’s choice.

14 Framing our learning

15 Objectives – Day 2 By the end of the day you will be able to:
Explain how supervision and evaluation support the purposes of the Professional Growth System. Explain different levels of thinking about lesson planning and their implications for student learning. Evaluate objectives based on the criteria for a mastery objective. Analyze evidence to determine if a teacher is planning and instructing for mastery. Write an objective paragraph in a post-observation conference report. Identify components of a teacher’s repertoire for framing learning and explain their importance to students. Explain the importance of literal note-taking and determine whether notes are literal or descriptive.

16 Itinerary – Day 2 Community builder / framing
Building our leadership vision Planning for mastery Writing about planning: the objective/planning paragraph Clarity: framing the big picture Data sources / literal notes Summary

17 Instructional Leadership
OAT 2010 DAY 1 Summer 2010 OAT I RBT KNOWLEDGE ABOUT TEACHING DATA ABOUT TEACHING & LEARNING Instructional Leadership HIGH EXPECTATIONS FOR ADULTS EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION Tripp, RBT

18 The Knowledge Base on Teaching
CURRICULUM PLANNING MOTIVATION INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES MANAGEMENT FOUNDATION OF ESSENTIAL BELIEFS KEY CONCEPTS Areas of Performance Repertoire Matching Overarching Objectives Curriculum Design Planning Assessment Learning Experiences Personal Relationship Building Class Climate Expectations Clarity Principles of Models of Teaching Space Time Routines Attention Momentum Discipline

19 Effort-Based Belief / Growth Mindset
CONFIDENCE + ABILITY ACHIEVEMENT + EFFECTIVE EFFORT Hard Work Strategies TST p. 270 Source: Adapted from Efficacy Institute, Lexington, MA.

20 something you just are;
Smart is not something you just are; smart is something you can get. Jeff Howard The Efficacy Institute

21 Discuss the implications of your responses for your leadership role.
Which of the seven beliefs are alive, well, and in evidence in your workplace? What effect do you see them having on student learning? Which are least evident? Why? How does their absence influence student learning? Discuss the implications of your responses for your leadership role. TST Chapter 2

22 Instructional Leadership
OAT 2010 DAY 1 Summer 2010 OAT I RBT KNOWLEDGE ABOUT TEACHING DATA ABOUT TEACHING & LEARNING Instructional Leadership HIGH EXPECTATIONS FOR ADULTS EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION Tripp, RBT

23 By the end of this portion of the day, you will be able to explain how supervision and evaluation support the purposes of the Professional Growth System. Objective SST1 sf10 G&K AP/IB (6/26 draft)Assessment 23

24 Review: The Six Standards Stand. Find your EXPECTATIONS partner. Recite the six standards to him or her. Share the strategy you used to be able to remember them.

25 MCPS Teacher Standards
Teachers are committed to students and their learning. Teachers know the subjects they teach and how to teach those subjects to students. Teachers are responsible for establishing and managing student learning in a positive environment. Teachers continually assess student progress, analyze the results, and adapt instruction to improve student achievement. Teachers are committed to continuous improvement and professional development. Teachers exhibit a high degree of professionalism.

26 Discuss which of the major purposes of supervision and evaluation have been most and least successfully addressed in MCPS. How do your strategies for working with your staff match these descriptors? Purposes of Supervision and Evaluation

27 Knowledge Power Courage
NB p. 27

28 Journal – NB p. 26 Where is the balance of these three aspects of leadership in your current work? What goals might you set for yourself in relationship to these three aspects?

29 Objective/mastery planning paragraph C E I J paragraphs
Recipe for a Post- Observation Conference Report Context paragraph Objective/mastery planning paragraph C E I J paragraphs Claim – area of performance Evidence Interpretation of impact on students (thus, as a result, therefore) Judgment included or implied Post-observation conference summary (including goal-setting) Summary

30 Context Paragraph: Criteria for Success
Teacher: Observation Date: Observer: Observation Time: School: Conference Date: Subject / Grade: Provides information about… Teacher Students Course or unit of study Special factors Announced or unannounced

31 Peer Feedback: The Context Paragraph
Feedback: Information on the ways in which a product or performance meets or does not meet established criteria for success. Peer Feedback: The Context Paragraph

32 Objective/mastery planning paragraph C E I J paragraphs
Recipe for a Post- Observation Conference Report Context paragraph Objective/mastery planning paragraph C E I J paragraphs Claim – area of performance Evidence Interpretation of impact on students (thus, as a result, therefore) Judgment included or implied Post-observation conference summary (including goal-setting) Summary

33 Compare your labeling of the CEIJ in paragraphs three through five in the Sarah Smith report. Come to consensus, if possible.

34 Sarah Smith CEIJ Paragraph 1
Mrs. Smith effectively presented information through explanatory devices. She created a graphic organizer on the overhead projector to guide the students through defining run-off. She translated the words dissolved and suspended into simpler language by way of a class discussion (“Spring-time…fertilizer on grass to make it greener…that salt fertilizer will mix with water and dissolve…we need to talk about what that word suspended means…okay we’re talking about debris..anything that doesn’t get dissolved…”). She also presented the students with environmental pictures (“To get started I have pictures with pretend news articles about the Chesapeake Bay…”). As a result, students with a variety of learning styles were focused and engaged.

35 Sarah Smith CEIJ Paragraph 2
Mrs. Smith used several instructional strategies to help the students make cognitive connections. She used questioning as a way to prompt a resemblance to the students’ experiences (“What’s usually included with pictures?...If something gets dissolved, what does that mean?”). She used a personal experience to help the students related the content to their own lives (“I took my cup of coffee and put sugar in it. It got dissolved in the coffee...” ). She asked the students to compare and contrast in order to make a connection to today’s learning (“Think about the pictures we looked at yesterday…”). Thus, students’ prior learning was utilized and connected with the new information given during this lesson.

36 Sarah Smith CEIJ Paragraph 3
Mrs. Smith has built a classroom climate in which students feel safe to take risks. She made several comments throughout the lesson to promote risk taking (“..could be…you could make that up…you don’t have to be perfect…”). She stated, “…as long as someone at your table has something to share we’re good.” After the students were told to write captions for given pictures, a student asked, “What’s a caption?” Mrs. Smith did not chastise the student for not knowing or remembering the meaning of the word caption, but answered her calmly and respectfully. Another student asked a question and Mrs. Smith replied quietly. Therefore, students could safely communicate their level of understanding and signal their need to move on or request help.

37 Balanced Analysis NB p. 40 CLAIM EVIDENCE IMPACT JUDGMENT
statement that a teacher performs a certain teaching skill EVIDENCE a quote or literal description of something said or done; at least three pieces of evidence are needed to constitute sufficient documentation to support a claim IMPACT statement of what the behavior accomplished; the effect on students; “the students” are the subject JUDGMENT adjective, adverb, sentence, phrase that lets the reader know what the writer thought of the teacher’s behavior; most often found IN the claim Balanced Analysis NB p. 40

38 Impact Is a statement of what was accomplished by the behavior just described in the claims and evidence. Establishes what was significant about the move in terms of students. Has “the students” as its subject.

39 Effective impact statements:
Show a logical cause-effect relationship with the claim. Match the evidence. Have the students as their subject. May include judgment by stating the quality (positive or negative) of the impact on students and their learning. As a result, students remained unclear as to the desired standard of work. Thus, students were able to reiterate the standards for their projects.

40 Evaluating Impact Statements
Review NB pp Evaluate each of the sample impact statements. Does it clearly communicate the effect of teacher behavior on students? Does it use the students as the subject? Discuss with your partner.

41 Let’s take a break!

42 By the end of this part of the day, you will be able to:  
Explain different levels of thinking about lesson planning and their implications for student learning. Evaluate objectives based on the criteria for a mastery objective. Analyze evidence to determine if a teacher is planning and instructing for mastery.    Objectives SST1 sf10 G&K AP/IB (6/26 draft)Assessment 42

43 Instructional Leadership
OAT 2010 DAY 1 Summer 2010 OAT I RBT KNOWLEDGE ABOUT TEACHING DATA ABOUT TEACHING & LEARNING Instructional Leadership HIGH EXPECTATIONS FOR ADULTS EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION Tripp, RBT

44 The Knowledge Base on Teaching
CURRICULUM PLANNING MOTIVATION INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES MANAGEMENT FOUNDATION OF ESSENTIAL BELIEFS KEY CONCEPTS Areas of Performance Repertoire Matching Overarching Objectives Curriculum Design Planning Assessment Learning Experiences Personal Relationship Building Class Climate Expectations Clarity Principles of Models of Teaching Space Time Routines Attention Momentum Discipline Sixth edition – 2008 – added Planning chapter

45 Activator What are the characteristics of standards-based instruction?
4/11/2017 What are the characteristics of standards-based instruction? Optional activity for extension Assessment 45

46 “To begin with the end in mind means to start with a clear understanding of your destination. It means to know where you’re going so that you better understand where you are now, so that the steps you take are always in the right direction.” Steven Covey The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

47 Reference Guide to Planning for Mastery
Use the text marking strategy to read the handout. Got it. (I could explain it to someone else.) This is important. (This is a key point.) What??? (I don’t understand it yet.) Reference Guide to Planning for Mastery

48 Key Questions in Lesson Planning
THINKING SKILLS OBJECTIVES What thinking skills do I want students to be able to use? Ends MASTERY OBJECTIVES What do I want students to know or be able to do when the lesson is over? How will I know if they know it or can do it? INVOLVEMENT How can I get students really engaged? ACTIVITIES What activities could students do to gain understanding or to develop these skills? Means COVERAGE What knowledge, skill, or concept am I teaching? Thinking Behind OBJECTIVES

49 Data From Pre-Assessment: Objectives and Criteria for Success
4/11/2017 Data From Pre-Assessment: Objectives and Criteria for Success Number assessed: 22 Met standard NY (not yet) Objectives 32% 68% Criteria for Success 10% 90% Assessment 49

50 Criteria for Mastery Objectives
4/11/2017 Criteria for Mastery Objectives The language of a mastery objective… is specific in terms of curricular knowledge (declarative or procedural) names an active performance (observable behavior) that demonstrates mastery TST p. 377 Source: Jon Saphier, Mary Ann Haley-Speca, and Robert Gower The Skillful Teacher, 6th ed. Acton, MA: Research for Better Teaching, p. 377. Assessment 50

51 Criteria for Mastery Objectives, con’t
4/11/2017 Criteria for Mastery Objectives, con’t Mastery objectives do not use mental action words that do not inform students about what they will have to do to demonstrate mastery, such as… understand know see that learn recognize that appreciate that be familiar with have a grasp of recognize the significance of TST p. 377 Source: Jon Saphier, Mary Ann Haley-Speca, and Robert Gower The Skillful Teacher, 6th ed. Acton, MA: Research for Better Teaching, p. 377. A Assessment 51

52 Today in Science… Mastery Objective:
By the end of class, you will be able to identify an infectious disease, the pathogen that causes it, and how the pathogen is spread. Activities: Research and take notes about infectious diseases. Work as a group to ask and answer questions about infectious diseases. Complete today’s Learning Log. 3 8th grade GT sciences classes One experimental, two control

53 Students will be able to draw and explain the life cycle of a butterfly using a cycle graphic organizer. (ES science) You will be able to identify the physical traits of a character and support each with at least two pieces of evidence from the text. (MS English) We will be able to make an accurate scale drawing of a room or apartment given actual dimensions. (HS math)

54 Parents will be able to describe ways that they can support their children with homework. (Parent meeting) Students will be able to identify strategies for resolving conflict and apply them to a given scenario. (Counseling session) Staff will be able to describe three interactive strategies and how they can apply them in class. (Department meeting)

55 Practice Revising Mastery Objectives NB pp. 265-267
Work with a job-alike partner, if possible. Select at least two objectives. Discuss how you might coach a teacher to revise the objective for a focus on mastery. What questions would you ask?

56 Formative Assessment:
Mastery Objectives Put your name on an index card. Write at least two original mastery objectives. Put the index card into the table folder.

57 Instructional Leadership
OAT 2010 DAY 1 Summer 2010 OAT I RBT KNOWLEDGE ABOUT TEACHING DATA ABOUT TEACHING & LEARNING Instructional Leadership HIGH EXPECTATIONS FOR ADULTS EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION Tripp, RBT

58 By the end of this portion of the day, you will be able to write an objective paragraph in a post-observation conference report. Objective SST1 sf10 G&K AP/IB (6/26 draft)Assessment 58

59 Observation Conference Report
Recipe for a Post- Observation Conference Report Context paragraph Objective/mastery planning paragraph C E I J paragraphs Claim – area of performance Evidence Interpretation of impact on students (thus, as a result, therefore) Judgment included or implied Post-observation conference summary (including goal-setting) Summary

60 What might a student experience in a lesson planned for mastery?

61 Planning for Mastery: Beyond the Objective
What do we want students to know and be able to do? How will they get there? What task will tell us they can do it? What should successful performance look like? Mastery objective (target) Activities (learning experiences) Assessment (product or performance) Criteria for success (characteristics of exemplary work; highest point on a rubric)

62 The purposes of the objective paragraph are to:
capture the teacher’s thinking, planning, and delivery of instruction; record the activities that were planned to lead students to the mastery objective; and explicitly present the data on student achievement of the mastery objective. The Objective / Planning Paragraph

63 The objective paragraph must answer…
Was the lesson planned for mastery or not? What was the objective? How was it communicated? What activities did the teacher do to lead students to mastery of the objective? What are the assessment data on student mastery or progress toward mastery of the objective? Let’s evaluate some examples!

64 A lesson with a clear, communicated mastery objective is not always taught for mastery.
A lesson without a clearly or clearly communicated mastery objective can be taught for mastery.

65 Observe for a match between…
the stated objective; the lived/delivered lesson; and the worthiness of the objective and lesson.

66 Giving Objective-Focused Feedback: The Stoplight
NB p. 64 RED: The objective does not reflect mastery thinking or planning (based on coverage, activity, or involvement thinking). The delivery of instruction does not match or support the intended objective. YELLOW- The objective MAY reflect mastery thinking or planning. The delivery of instruction does not match or support the intended objective. GREEN- The objective reflects mastery thinking or planning. The delivery of instruction and teacher actions fully match and support the intended mastery objective.

67 Leadership Connections
How will you, as an instructional leader, ensure that teachers plan lessons focused on student mastery?

68 Lunch!

69 Instructional Leadership
OAT 2010 DAY 1 Summer 2010 OAT I RBT KNOWLEDGE ABOUT TEACHING DATA ABOUT TEACHING & LEARNING Instructional Leadership HIGH EXPECTATIONS FOR ADULTS EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION Tripp, RBT

70 By the end of this part of the day, you will be able to identify components of a teacher’s repertoire for framing learning and explain their importance to students. Objective SST1 sf10 G&K AP/IB (6/26 draft)Assessment 70

71 The Knowledge Base on Teaching
CURRICULUM PLANNING MOTIVATION INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES MANAGEMENT FOUNDATION OF ESSENTIAL BELIEFS KEY CONCEPTS Areas of Performance Repertoire Matching Overarching Objectives Curriculum Design Planning Assessment Learning Experiences Personal Relationship Building Class Climate Expectations Clarity Principles of Models of Teaching Space Time Routines Attention Momentum Discipline

72 Activator How do skillful teachers make concepts and skills clear and accessible to students?

73 Clarity TST p. 163 NB p. 304 Framing the big picture
Getting ready for instruction Presenting information through well-chosen explanatory devices Monitoring and matching speech Being explicit Making connections Checking for understanding Unscrambling confusion Making student thinking audible Summarizing TST p. 163 NB p. 304 HO

74 Framing the Big Picture
Being sure students understand the… Mastery objective Itinerary Big idea/essential question Reasons for activities Reasons the work is worthwhile Criteria for success Clarity TST p. 163 NB p. 304

75 Nothing means anything until it connects to something.
David Sousa How the Brain Learns

76 What does Catherine do to frame the lesson for her AP Biology students?
Catherine Sobieszczyk (so – bee - ESS – chick) – still at Wheaton – 4 minutes TST p. 163; NB p. 304 SST1 sf10 G&K AP/IB (6/26 draft)Assessment

77 What does Valerie do to frame the lesson for her math students?
Valerie CD ES math About 3.5 minutes TST p. 163; NB p. 304

78 Kiersey Temperment Sorter
True Colors Meyers-Briggs Modality Preference

79 4MAT Bernice McCarthy - About Learning, Inc. Jeanine O’Neill-Blackwell
4MAT video on line 4+ minutes why do I care what does the info tell me how does this work, can I use this if this is true, then what drive the learning process all move through ans all four q’s when really learning riding a bike… also drive training design and delivery have to ask and ans the 4 q’s lead the learner through the q’s allow them to explore the ans themselves engage – why – experiences that connect learner to content share – what – content – meat practice – how – creat opp to apply information perform – if – create opp for lrnr to take ownership of info, refine, adapt meet the needs of all learners design learning that really sticks

80 Which question do you MOST want answered in a new learning situation?
Four Corners What if...? Why? Which question do you MOST want answered in a new learning situation? How? What?

81 What if? Why? Aboutlearning.com How? What?

82 What will you take away from today’s discussions of CLARITY?
Summary What will you take away from today’s discussions of CLARITY? How will your work as an instructional leader be affected by what you’ve learned? DIDN’T SHOW/DO

83 Instructional Leadership
OAT 2010 DAY 1 Summer 2010 OAT I RBT KNOWLEDGE ABOUT TEACHING DATA ABOUT TEACHING & LEARNING Instructional Leadership HIGH EXPECTATIONS FOR ADULTS EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION Tripp, RBT

84 Explain the importance of literal note-taking and determine whether notes are literal or descriptive. Objective SST1 sf10 G&K AP/IB (6/26 draft)Assessment 84

85 Data NB p. 70 Read about the opportunities and obligations for using data. Work with your table group to make additions to the web.

86 Literal Notes quotes and descriptions
important events, actions, conversations times specific names facts; not analysis characteristics of interactions and settings questions for follow-up Read the first two parts of NB p. 78, Note Taking. Discuss your response. Literal Notes

87 The Effects of Having/Not Having Literal Notes
1 Cheerleading 2 Enrichment 3 Improvement 4 Real Problems

88 Literal Notes Example #1: NB p. 80
Time notations, questions, analysis Teacher actions and quotes Student names, actions, quotes

89 Literal Notes Example #2: Real Life
HS Bridge to Algebra 2 math lesson Lesson took place on an HSA day, so some students were absent, and the class did not take place at its usual time of day. At this point, they were going over answers to the activator, which had problems designed to help students determine which bank loan would be in their best interest. There was no objective or agenda posted or communicated. Parentheses indicate student responses (all were called out). Brackets indicate observer’s notes. We start with y = (4000) Notice this isn’t exponential, it’s… (linear) Questions or comments? [8 seconds of wait time] Glad to see you wake up in the afternoon just as hyper as in the morning 12:48 What bank? (Bank of America) What is my next question? (why) Bank of America because they give more money after five years Are you ready? [7 seconds of wait time] (Are we going to do more problems?) Heck, yeah, class doesn’t end now. #2 – it says you have a home bought in 2002, purchased for $200,000 12:51 Right on time – you’re here for the good ones [to a student entering the class late] Here’s the word “appreciated?” Appreciated means… (Up)

90

91 Note-Taking Abbreviations and Symbols
U 2 cn do it fstr! Y not? C, yr rdg w/o NE prob! Yr a NB p. 81 Note-Taking Abbreviations and Symbols

92 Making the Case for Literal Notes
Narrative notes from a 6th grade math observation: “The teacher went over the homework.” Compare the literal notes on NB p. 165. What are the messages students receive from the teacher in each example? Which set of literal notes would be most valuable for giving a teacher feedback? Scenario 1 – Exceptionally skilled You go into someone’s classroom, and they’re exceptionally skilled. You’re just very abstract; writing notes just cramps your style. You’re doing a post-observation conference – no notes; you didn’t take any. You say, “You were fabulous – everything you did was great – etc. Any questions? Sign here.” That’s the feedback. You with me so far? New scene – you’re still fabulous, highly skilled. I’m observing you with my legal pad. Whether it’s my learning style or not, it doesn’t matter. (I’ll give you lots of hints so that it becomes less painful.) You script. When it’s our conference, I say, “You had phenomenal management – let me tell you why. These are the ways you got attention – this was the effect on your kids. You used the following instructional strategies – this was the effect. You were fabulous – this is why.” What happens, because I gave you very literal notes, is very specific feedback – the gift of internal validation, if you’re very skilled, and you never know why. I now know what I did right – I’ve been validated – I can repeat it. I don’t have to be nervous before I’m observed. Scenario 2 – OK New scene – OK, status quo. I’m not setting the world on fire; I’m not doing any harm. I’m under the radar – low end of boring, going through my paces, covering my content. Kids are on task. You’re not taking literal notes. You want to tell me something, but you can’t build any context for the suggestions you’ll give. I might consider them, but might not, because there’s no evidence that I need to take to heart. BUT – with scrupulous notes, at the post-obs conf, you’re telling me exactly what I did. I mean well, but I press on, because I don’t know what to do when kids don’t get it. That’s a shame. You now can give me very specific strategies of what to do for the kids who didn’t get it, and you’ll apply those strategies the next day, and I will be back to make sure that you use the strategies and they get it. You’ve given me a reason to follow through. I can be less defensive, react to the data. Scenario 3 – Help I actually need help, some fixing. You’re not documenting me to get rid of me, but I need some serious improvement. Well, you don’t like to take notes. So you tell me I’m in need of improvement – and I say, “I’m calling my union rep – you have no evidence. You just don’t like me.” And you, the observer, are stuck. AS OPPOSED TO You’re sarcastic “So, you decided to show up today.” “Look who’s brain is working today.” As a result, shutdown occurred. We must have literal notes to prove a point. Scenario 4 Here’s a fourth scenario: you’re seriously damaging students. Historically, only this scenario merited the taking of literal notes – documenting negative teacher pedagogy. In reality, that’s less than 1% of the teaching population. If we view ourselves as instructional leaders, we’re not spending most of our time there. How are we going to boost the skills of the category 1 and 2 teachers? With very specific feedback – from literal notes.

93 Mara – HS Biology

94 First Steps in Analysis
Read over and clean up your notes. Holistic impressions What do you infer the lesson objective to be? What teaching strategies stood out as positive, negative or missing? What questions might you want to ask? Label important events by asking yourself what the teachers words and actions accomplished or intended to accomplish (framing - TST p. 163; NB p. 304) What claim can you make based on the evidence?

95 Literal Notes Example #3: Real Life, Analyzed

96 On each finger write a key idea from today’s class.
Trace your hand. On each finger write a key idea from today’s class. On the palm, ask a question or comment on today’s topics. It's a Handful!

97 Assignments

98 SST1 Day 1 1. 2. sf 09

99 See you on October 4th!

100

101

102 See you tomorrow!

103 Possible Mastery Objective
Indicator Recognize instances of propaganda and persuasive techniques ( ) Possible Mastery Objective You will be able to analyze magazine advertisements for techniques that advertisers use to convince people to buy their products. What a complex process – such sophisticated thinking – creativity – matching - differentiation

104 You will understand and appreciate the dangers of eating disorders.
NO YES You will understand and appreciate the dangers of eating disorders. You will be able to identify the signs and symptoms of anorexia and bulimia …and… to explain appropriate strategies to use if a friend or family member shows symptoms.

105 NO YES Students will demonstrate effective technique and rules when playing the game of basketball. Students will be able to dribble the ball continuously down the court without losing control of it.

106 Brain to Behind 30 - 90 Connection After 30 minutes of sitting…
37-90 Brain to Behind Connection After 30 minutes of sitting… the body needs 90 seconds of movement

107 Clarity Getting ready for instruction
Activating students’ current knowledge Pre-assessing Anticipating confusions and misconceptions TST p. 163

108 What purposes does activating serve?
4/11/2017 What purposes does activating serve? Engage students Make thinking public Pique curiosity Identify students’ current knowledge Surface misconceptions Empower the learner Gather data that might lead to adapting the lesson Create cognitive engagement Empower the learner: “I already know something…” Share fun and adventure I 108 Assessment SST1 sf10 G&K AP/IB (6/26 draft)Assessment 108 108 108

109 Class Examples: Activators
NB pp. DIDN’T SHOW/DO

110 All activators can be warm-ups, but not all warm-ups are activators.
Yellow = warmup Green = activator. All activators can be warmups. NOT all warmups are activators. Activators SST1 D1 sf10 AP.IB G&K

111 Class Examples: Summarizers
NB pp.

112 Learning is constructed as learners assimilate new experience with prior knowledge.
Essential belief #2


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