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Michigan High School Science Content Expectations October 2006.

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Presentation on theme: "Michigan High School Science Content Expectations October 2006."— Presentation transcript:

1 Michigan High School Science Content Expectations October 2006

2 Goals for This Session Become familiar with – HS Science Content Expectations – Practices of Scientific Literacy – Levels of Expectations – Coding Participate in group activities to −Better understand how to use the documents −Implement in your classroom

3 Two Documents High School Content Expectations (HSCE) Michigan Merit Curriculum Course/Credit Requirements (CCE)

4 Four Disciplines of Science Physics Chemistry Earth Science Biology No order implied

5 NAEP Content Statement Early in the history of the universe, matter, primarily the light atoms hydrogen and helium, clumped together by gravitational attraction to form countless trillions of stars and billions of galaxies. (E12.2 ) Built from NAEP 2009 HSCE Content Statement Early in the history of the universe, matter clumped together by gravitational attraction to form stars and galaxies.(E5.1)

6 Four Practices of Scientific Literacy  Identifying  Recall, define, relate, represent basic principles  Using  Make sense of the natural world, predict and explain observations  Inquiry  Identify and explain patterns, habits of mind  Reflecting  Critique and justify strengths and weaknesses of scientific knowledge

7 Identifying: Stating Models and Patterns

8 Using Models and Patterns to Predict or Explain Observations

9 Inquiry: Finding and Explaining Patterns in Data

10 Using Models and Patterns to Predict or Explain Observations

11  Prerequisite  Knowledge needed when entering high school  Recommendations to K-7 committee  Essential  Critical knowledge regardless of course  Aligned to large-scale assessment (MME,NAEP)  Core  Specific to the discipline (course)  Required for credit in required areas (Biology, and Chemistry or Physics)  Preparation for advanced study  Recommended  Appropriate for rigorous college preparation courses Four Levels of Expectations

12 Credit for high school Earth Science, Biology, Physics, and Chemistry will be defined as meeting BOTH essential and core subject area content expectations. Represents required for graduation Choic e A ll

13 Organizational Structure Discipline Standard Content Statement Content Expectation

14 Structure of Document

15 Content Expectations Earth Science 5 Standards 17 Content Statements 65 Essential Expectations 43 Core Expectations Biology (Required for All) 5 Standards 20 Content Statements 57 Essential Expectations 65 Core Expectations Physics (Choice) 4 Standards 25 Content Statements 62 Essential Expectations 62 Core Expectations Chemistry (Choice) 5 Standards 29 Content Statements 42 Essential Expectations 89 Core Expectations

16 Example of Structure Discipline: Chemistry Standard C5: Changes in Matter Students will analyze a chemical change phenomenon from the point of view of what is the same and what is not the same Content Statement C5.4 Phase Change/Diagrams Changes of state require a transfer of energy. Water has unusually high-energy changes associated with its changes of state. C5.4A Compare the energy required to raise the temperature of one gram of aluminum and one gram of water the same number of degrees. C5.4B Measure, plot, and interpret the graph of the temperature versus time of an ice-water mixture, under slow heating, through melting and boiling

17 Coding Four High School Disciplines –Chemistry (C) –Physics (P) –Earth (E) –Biology (B) Three Middle School Disciplines –Life (L) –Physical (P) –Earth (E)

18 Content Statement Coding Two digits to the left of the decimal indicate discipline and standard Four or five standards for each discipline Example: B3.2 Ecosystems B indicates the discipline of Biology 3 indicates Standard 3 in the discipline of Biology

19 Content Statement Coding One or two digits to the right of decimal point indicate level of content statement The number is the content statement sequence in the standard. “x” in content statement indicates all core expectations “p” in content statement indicates all prerequisite expectations

20 Content Statement Coding Example: B3.2 Ecosystems B indicates the discipline of Biology 3 indicates Standard 3 in the discipline of Biology 2 indicates Content Statement 2 in Standard B3 (this content statement may contain both essential and core expectations)

21 Content Statement Coding Example: B3.4x Human Impact B indicates the discipline of Biology 3 indicates Standard 3 in the discipline of Biology 4x indicates the all core Content Statement 4 in Standard B3 (content statement contains only core expectations)

22 Content Statement Coding Example: L3.p1 Populations, Communities, & Ecosystems (prerequisite) L indicates the discipline of Life (MS) 3 indicates Standard 3 in the discipline of Biology p1 indicates a prerequisite Content Statement 1 in Standard L3 (prerequisites are coded by their MS discipline)

23 Content Expectation Coding Two digits to the left of the decimal indicate discipline and standard Four or five standards for each discipline Example: B3.2A Identify how energy is stored in an ecosystem. B indicates the discipline of Biology 3 indicates Standard 3 in the discipline of Biology

24 Content Expectation Coding The number to the right of the decimal is the content statement number sequence. The letter following this number designates the expectation sequence. Capital letters indicate essential content expectations; lower case letters represent core content expectations. B2.4h

25 Content Expectation Coding Example B2.4h Describe the structures of viruses and bacteria. B indicates the discipline Biology 2 indicates Standard 2 4 indicates Content Statement 4 h indicates Content Expectation 8 (lower case means core expectation)

26 Content Expectation Coding IF there is a letter preceding this number to the right of the decimal, it represents the expectation level as prerequisite or recommended L3.p3D B3.r5g Which brings us back to levels of expectations…

27 Coding Levels of Expectations Prerequisite: “p” first letter to the right of decimal in Content Statement and Content Expectation codes (e.g., L3.p4, L3.p4A) Essential: –No extra letters in Content Statement codes (e.g., B3.4) –Capital letters in Content Expectation codes (e.g., B3.4A)

28 Coding Levels of Expectations Core: –“x” in Content Statement codes (e.g., B3.4x) –Lower case in Content Expectation codes (e.g., B3.4c) Recommended: “r” first letter to the right of decimal in Content Statement and Content Expectation codes (e.g., B4.r5x, B4.r5a)

29 Document Walk Through The Course/Credit Requirement documents will eventually contain the most, but not all, of the information in HSCE. We will use HSCE for today’s activities.

30 Document Scavenger Hunt Activity 1 – Document Scavenger Hunt Find C3.4g.

31 Document Scavenger Hunt How did you know where to look? Describe your searching process to your neighbor. Did you use the same process? How did you know to look under C3.4x?

32 Document Scavenger Hunt Find an expectation that addresses changing the variables. Record the expectation code. Did everyone at your table find the same expectation?

33 Document Scavenger Hunt Open Earth Science to page 11. Suppose you want to design a climate unit. By yourself, find applicable expectations and list them. Share with your table and record on a poster.

34 Document Scavenger Hunt NOTE: Your climate unit utilized and addressed several content expectations that were not listed together in the document. The documents are NOT organized by units of instruction. Teachers will create their own units of instruction as part of their district curriculum development.

35 Classroom Instruction Activity 2 – Analyze a specific class Compare an existing class to the new expectations.

36 Classroom Instruction Individually, think of your own class in a specific discipline. How do you teach? What do you teach? Thinking of your course, break it into the big ideas taught in a year. What are your units of instruction? Write them down. (5 minutes)

37 Classroom Instruction Table discussion Record units on chart paper

38 Classroom Instruction Use bookmark for your discipline. Walk around to look at the units posted. (5 min) Discuss What is missing in the units? What is missing on the bookmark? How will this affect your classroom? Record your thoughts.

39 Classroom Instruction Alignment Record – Tool Evaluate current practice

40 ACT and Inquiry Activity 3 – “ACT and be a student” Experience ACT practice sample (subset of ACT sample test)

41 ACT Science Timed Test Do not turn the page until instructed. You have 12 minutes to complete the 13 items. There are two passages in this test. Each passage is followed by several questions. After reading a passage, choose the best answer to each question. You are NOT permitted to use a calculator on this test.

42 How did you do? Tier II Answers 1 B8 G 2 J9 C 3 C10 H 4 F11 D 5 A12 H 6 J13 B 7 D

43 ACT Sample Test Complete ACT sample test Additional ACT online tests Other standardized tests (ACT and State/National)

44 ACT Reflections List 3 revelations you have about the test. Share with your table and pick the top three new “important facts to know.” Share with entire group.

45 ACT Performance How much content knowledge was necessary? What will students need to know? Is this being taught in your classroom?

46 ACT Item Distribution

47 ACT Performance Online College Readiness Standards ACT College Readiness Standards (Extended Version in Tool Kit)

48 ACT Performance As a group, write one inquiry expectation and one reflecting expectation for your content statement. Record on the sheet provided.

49 ACT Performance Example: Inquiry and Reflecting Expectation Content Statement C3.1x Hess’s Law: For chemical reactions where the state and amounts of reactants and products are known, the amount of energy transferred will be the same regardless of the chemical pathway. This relationship is called Hess’s Law. Design an experiment to verify the specific heat of copper. Explain whether the specific heat of any liquid can be determined by using a simple calorimeter and Hess’s law.

50 ACT Performance Discuss as a group, what you could do to support this content statement. Types of activities? Any articles? Internet searches? Labs? List on your activity sheet.

51 Next Steps Elementary and Middle School Science GLCE High School Science Companion/ Clarification Documents

52 Elementary and Middle School Science GLCE In process of development Assistance from MSTA and MS Network Drafts for web/public review Spring 2007

53 HS Companion Documents Identify specific constraints and boundaries –Phenomena, examples, or observations –Representations, instruments, units of measurement, and categories for classification –Technical vocabulary Clarifications of intent Content-specific inquiry and reflection examples Parent and Student Guides Model Unit Development

54 Before Leaving… Evaluation Needs Survey

55 Find Information on Web ACT.org ( POLICY MAKERS ) On Course for Success ACT.org ( POLICY MAKERS ) Reading Between the Lines Understanding University Success Resources from High Schools That Work (including Making Middle Schools Work)

56 Find Information on Web Michigan.gov/highschool (with link to HSCE site) Michigan.gov/hsce Michigan.gov/oeaa (MME/ACT information) Michigan.gov/science (science resources)

57 MDE Contact Information High School Content Expectations Susan Codere Kelly Science HS Content Expectations Kevin Richard Content Expectations Gale Sharpe


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