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Haskell Chapter 5, Part I. Topics  Higher Order Functions  map, filter  Infinite lists Get out a piece of paper… we’ll be doing lots of tracing.

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Presentation on theme: "Haskell Chapter 5, Part I. Topics  Higher Order Functions  map, filter  Infinite lists Get out a piece of paper… we’ll be doing lots of tracing."— Presentation transcript:

1 Haskell Chapter 5, Part I

2 Topics  Higher Order Functions  map, filter  Infinite lists Get out a piece of paper… we’ll be doing lots of tracing

3 Higher Order Functions  A function that can take functions as parameters  OR  A function that returns a function as result  Think of calculus. What sort of operation takes a function and returns another function?  Think of AI. What aspects of human behavior might you model with a higher order function?

4 First simple example - map  Map (built in) takes a function and a list, applies function to every element in the list map' :: (a->b) -> [a] -> [b] map' _ [] = [] map' f (x:xs) = f x : map' f xs  Try:  map' even [1,2,3,4,5]  map ' square [1,2,3,4,5] (assumes square is defined)  map' (++ "!") ["snap", "crackle", "pop"]  map fst [(1,2), (3,5), (7,8)]  Can you explain the type signature?

5 More mapping  map (+3) [4,7,9]  [x+3 | x <- [4,7,9]] -- equivalent, maybe less readable Nested maps  map (map (^2)) [[1,2],[3,4],[5,6]] Trace this On paper: write result Think about how it works

6 Another simple example - filter  Takes a predicate function and a list, returns a list of elements that satisfy that predicate filter' :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a] filter' _ [] = [] filter' p (x:xs) | p x = x : filter' p xs | otherwise = filter' p xs  Try  filter' (>3) [1,2,6,3]  filter (== 3) [1,2,4,5] Trace this

7 Sections  What if you want to partially apply an infix function, such as +, -, /, *?  Use parentheses:  (+3)  (subtract 4) needed; (-4) means negative 4, not subtraction  (/10)  (*5)  (/10) 200

8 Quick exercise  Create a simple map that cubes the numbers in a list,  e.g., [1,2,3] => [1,8,27]  Create a map that takes a nested list and removes the first element of each list,  e.g., [[2,4,5],[5,6],[8,1,2]] => [[4,5],[6],[1,2]]  Using `elem` and filter, write a function initials that takes a string and returns initials (assume only initials are caps),  e.g., “Cyndi Ann Rader” => “CAR”  Write a function named noEven that takes a nested list and returns a nested list of only the odd numbers.  e.g., noEven [[1,2,3],[4,6]] => [[1,3],[]]

9 Infinite List Examples

10 More interesting examples largestDivisible :: Integral a => a -> a largestDivisible num = head (filter p [100000, ]) where p x = x `mod` num == 0  Goal: find the largest number under 100,000 that’s divisible by num  Note the infinite list… since we use only the head, this will stop as soon as there’s an element  Order of list is descending, so we get the largest  What is p??? It’s a predicate function created in the where.  Try it:  largestDivisible 3829 =>  largestDivisible 113 =>  largestDivisible 3 => 99999

11 takeWhile  takeWhile takes a predicate and a list, returns elements as long as the predicate is true  sum (takeWhile (<10) [1..100])  takeWhile (/= ' ') "what day is it?"  Find the sum of all odd squares < 10,000  need to create squares  select only odd squares  stop when square >= 10,000  sum (takeWhile (<10000) (filter odd (map (^2) [1..])))  OR  sum (takeWhile (<10000) [m | m <- [n^2 | n <- [1..]], odd m]) Trace these – walk through first couple of steps

12 Thunks*  Lists are lazy  [1,2,3,4] is really 1:2:3:4:[]  When first element is evaluated (e.g., by printing it), the rest of the list 2:3:4:[] is a promise of a list – known as a thunk  A thunk is a deferred computation * from chapter 9

13 An Example

14 A fun problem  Collatz sequence/chain  Start with any natural number  If the number is 1, stop  If the number is even, divide it by 2  If the number is odd, multiply it by 3 and add 1  Repeat with the result number  Example: start with 13 -> 40 -> 20 -> 10 -> 5 -> 16 -> 8 -> 4 -> 2 -> 1  Mathematicians theorize that for all starting numbers, the chain will finish at the number 1.  Our goal: for all starting numbers between 1 and 100, how many have Collatz chains with length > 15? Think about: what kinds of problems are we solving here?

15 The code chain :: Integer -> [Integer] chain 1 = [1] chain n | even n = n : chain (n `div` 2) | odd n = n : chain (n*3 + 1) numLongChains :: Int numLongChains = length (filter isLong (map chain [1..100])) where isLong xs = length xs > 15 Discuss this

16 Curried Functions

17  Every function in Haskell officially takes one parameter  So, how have we been able to do functions that take two parameters?  They are curried functions.  Always take exactly one parameter  When called with that parameter, it returns a function that takes the next parameter  etc. until all parameters used JavaScript: objects are just hashes Haskell: every function takes exactly one argument

18 A curried example  :t max => max :: Ord a => a -> a -> a  equivalent to max :: (Ord a) => a -> (a -> a)  max 4 5 === (max 4) 5  (max 4) returns a partially applied function  Try: (max ((max 4) 5)) 3  Try: (max 4) 5 max 4 5 max 5 35 max 4 max 4 _ max max 5 _ 5 5

19 Can’t show a function *Main> (max 4) :88:1: No instance for (Show (a0 -> a0)) arising from a use of `print' Possible fix: add an instance declaration for (Show (a0 -> a0)) In a stmt of an interactive GHCi command: print it  What??  (max 4) produced a function of type (a0 -> a0)  But functions aren’t instances of Show, so GHCi doesn’t know how to display Compare to Scheme:

20 Another example multThree :: Int -> Int -> Int -> Int multThree x y z = x * y * z  multThree => 135  ((multThree 3) 5) 9 multThree multThree 3 multThree 3 multThree * I’m not saying this is how it’s implemented… just a way to think about it…

21 multThree continued multThree :: Int -> Int -> Int -> Int multThree x y z = x * y * z  multThree => 135  ((multThree 3) 5) 9  multThree :: Int -> (Int -> (Int -> Int)) – equivalent A. function takes Int, returns function of type (Int -> (Int ->Int)) B. that function takes an Int, returns function of type (Int -> Int) C. that function takes an Int, returns an Int multThree multThree 3 multThree 3 multThree A B C Discuss this

22 Take advantage of currying You can store a partially applied function: *Main> let multTwoWithNine = multThree 9 *Main> multTwoWithNine multThree 9 multThree 9 _ _ multTwoWithNine 2 (9) 2 _ 3 multTwoWithNine 9 2 _ 54

23 How could we use this? multThreeF.10 multThreeF 10 _ _ tenPctDiscount Write the code in Play and Share 4 tenPctDiscount What if you wanted a 20% discount? 25%?

24 Another Example multThree 2 multThree 2 doubleArea Write the code in Play and Share 4 doubleArea doubleArea

25 Play and Share  Write a function doubleArea that takes a width and height and returns 2 * the area – making use of multThree (could clearly be done directly, but use multThree for curry practice).  doubleArea 4 5 => 40  Write a function multThreeF that works with floating point values. (hint: use Num a as a class constraint)  Write a function tenPctDiscount that takes two numbers and calculates a 10% discount (using your multThreeF, of course)  tenPctDiscount 4 5 => 2.0  Write a function named pctDiscount that takes a floating point and returns a partially applied function. Usage:  *Main> let sale = pctDiscount 0.5  *Main> sale 4 5  10.0  *Main> (pctDiscount 0.5) 4 5  10.0

26 More Play and Share  Curried functions are convenient with map  Write a function total that takes a discount % and two numbers stored in a list, and returns the discount amount  total 0.1 [4,5] => 2.0  Write a function totalTenPct that returns a partially applied total function with discount set to 0.1  Try using this with map:  map totalTenPct [[4,5],[8,10]] => [2.0, 8.0]  Play with other uses of map, e.g.,  map (multThree 3 4) [5,6,7]


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