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Guide to Employee Engagement Survey Data and Action Planning

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1 Guide to Employee Engagement Survey Data and Action Planning
NOTE: This guide provides more information on the University of Minnesota’s E2 Employee Engagement Survey and how to use its data to support action planning and implement plans to enhance engagement. © 2013 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. 1

2 More information and talking points are in the notes section.
NOTE: This is a large document with information to better understand 2014 E2 Employee Engagement Survey data and how to take action. Parts of the deck can be adapted and used to share survey data. This Guide is available online at Insight2Action (The Hay Group’s online tool) or the OHR E2 website. (umn.edu/ohr/training/e2) More information and talking points are in the notes section. NOTE: This Guide is available online at I2A or the OHR E2 website. (umn.edu/ohr/training/e2) © 2013 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. 2

3 Guide Overview About employee engagement and E2 Survey Data
Additional Question Detail Next Steps: Action Planning & Implementation Action Planning Resources How to Use Insight2Action (I2A) Tips for Sharing Progress NOTE: Every leader who had at least 10 staff and/or 10 faculty responses to their respective surveys will be ed a report from Hay Group, the University’s vendor partner. These reports are accessed via Hay Group's Insight2Action (I2A) online tool. The reports are a PowerPoint presentation which can be modified and integrated with slides in this guide. A Communications Toolkit is available online from the Office of Human Resources which contains key messages, sample templates for communications, and frequently asked questions.

4 What Engagement Research and Experience Tell Us
What sets great organizations apart? Dedication and commitment to collective excellence and wellbeing. Why is this important to the University? The degree to which employee engagement is present profoundly shapes the quality of experiences and outcomes in the workplace. Recruiting, retaining, and developing top talent Employee resilience and wellbeing Collaboration and innovation Sustaining a high-level of performance NOTE: President Kaler and the University’s Board of Regents support employee engagement and the value it brings to leaders in identifying areas to improve the faculty and staff experience. Employee engagement—including the University’s E2 Survey—are well-grounded in research. University of Minnesota research found engagement drivers were also hallmarks of our most research-productive departments (Bland. Weber-Main, Lund and Finstad, 2005). Why Engagement? Today’s changing work practices and grand challenges require new ways of thinking and working together. Engagement helps align unit goals with effective workplace practices for optimal outcomes and is seen as game changing. Industry research shows that engaged employees: Are more productive Are more collaborative and innovative Have fewer performance problems Are safer Take less time off and have lower turnover 3

5 The University’s Engagement Strategy
Goal: Support campuses, colleges, and departments/units address local workplace factors that support engagement and enable excellence in research, teaching, and service Developed: In consultation with deans, chancellors, vice- presidents, faculty and staff leaders, governance groups and a faculty advisory committee Combines validated items from Hay Group and customized items created by the E2 Faculty Advisory Committee Aligned with U of M published research on drivers of research- productive facilities (Bland, Weber-Main, Lund, & Finstad, 2005) NOTE: The U of M engagement process has been consultative, resulting in final survey content that was developed in part from Hay Group’s wide selection of survey items and internal recommendations (faculty advisory board) to identify survey questions that best fit our mission. The Hay Group is a global consultant in engagement surveys that has access to a wealth of data from organizations across the globe. They were chosen as our engagement survey partner. The University published its own research in 2005 examining which factors make productive research units and found close overlap with many of the same factors that have been identified and included in our engagement survey. 2

6 Survey Administration Summary
When October 13 – 31, 2014 What Separate faculty and staff surveys 36 scored questions in each survey Assess commitment and dedication plus effective environment How Externally managed by Hay Group to ensure confidentiality Participation All benefits-eligible University of Minnesota faculty and staff 2,493 faculty responses (52% participation rate) 9,599 staff responses (68% participation rate) NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT This is the second year of the E2 Employee Engagement Survey administration and response rate increased overall: Overall response rate: increased from 57% (2013) to 64% (2014) Faculty participation rate: increased from 47% (2013) to 52% (2014) Staff participation rate: increased from 60% (2013) to 68% (2014)

7 Engagement Process and Timeline
Survey (October) Review & Share Results (January –March) Refine Action Plans (February –April) Implement Action Plans (April–January) Measure & Share Progress (March–September) Action Plan NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT The timing of engagement actions are suggested to assist unit leaders to ensure efforts have an impact in the next year’s survey. This process is cyclical and some steps in the process are intended to be concurrent so leaders have flexibility. This slide gives more details about the annual engagement process and timeline, and it is how we have organized the engagement website (http://www1.umn.edu/ohr/training/e2/consulting/index.html) with tools and resources for each stage in the process. The steps on the Hay Group’s Insight2Action (I2A) website are very similar. The site can be accessed by leaders who receive a survey report (leaders must have at least 10 faculty or 10 staff who complete their respective survey to receive a report). If your department or unit did not create an action plan in 2013, tools are available from the I2A website and on the University’s engagement website.

8 Employee Engagement Model
NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT This slide presents the U of M’s engagement model which is based on two key metrics or outcomes of engagement: Commitment and Dedication Effective Work Environment The U model is unique because it allows us to more clearly define areas that are related to motivation and performance of the individual versus workplace environment. Drivers are areas where leaders, faculty, and staff can take action. The survey content has been divided into these two sections to help more clearly identify and target areas for meaningful action. 8 8

9 The Three Most Important Things to Know About Employee Engagement
A survey alone does not create positive change. Only involving leaders, faculty, and staff in responding to survey results can create positive change in the work environment. Share your results. Disengagement begins when people who take time to respond to a survey don’t hear their results from their leaders. Take action. A few small, simple actions can have a large impact. Be certain to let faculty and staff know when actions were taken based on their survey feedback. NOTE: You can make significant impact by: Communicating your focus and support in the follow-up process. Planning and implementing concrete actions based on the results with faculty and staff. Monitoring the progress of your actions, making adjustments as necessary, and communicating regularly about progress.

10 How to Understand Your Report
This report presents survey results for your work group. The survey measures employees’ levels of engagement through the key metrics of commitment & dedication and effective environment. The survey also looks at ten other drivers of employee engagement. This guide has general guidelines. However, leaders need to use their understanding of their employees to verify the data against the context of their local environment. NOTE: The survey report available to managers with at least 10 responses (faculty and/or staff) is significantly shorter than this presentation. Some of the same slides are in both and offers additional materials for understanding and taking action on survey results. Information on the next several slides includes general guidelines to help leaders gauge the impact of the data plus when and where to take action. These are intended as general guidelines that should be applied in the context of what leaders know about their employees and their local work environments. 10

11 How to Understand Your Report, cont’d
The report is divided into four sections: Dimension and Engagement Results Strengths and Opportunities Additional Question Detail Next Steps 11

12 Review Survey Results Using Multiple Lenses
Absolute Scores Comparisons With Benchmarks Strengths and Opportunities Qualitative Information Survey Data Context-Based Data NOTE: It is best to review the survey data through three lenses: absolute scores in key metrics and drivers, comparison of data with benchmarks (University, campus, college, and 2013 same-unit data, when available), plus strengths and opportunities. In addition, qualitative data includes the larger context in which this data was gathered–what’s going on for the unit that might explain these results, such as large-scale initiatives, strategic planning and/or fiscal planning, as well as the context provided by other data that may have been gathered within the unit around key initiatives.

13 Survey Scales & Benchmarks
SAMPLE Benchmarks 2014 Total University: results across all campuses 2014 Total Campus: results for your campus only 2014 Total College/Unit: results for your college/unit or department only 2013 Same Unit Results: Results from your college/unit or department in 2013 Percentage Favorable Scale Favorable: “Strongly Agree” + “Agree” and “Very Good” + “Good” Neutral : “Neither Agree nor Disagree” Unfavorable: “Strongly Disagree” + “Disagree” and “Very Poor” + “Poor” NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT The corresponding bar graphs show the percent favorable responses which includes “strongly agree,” “agree,” “very good,” and “good.” The percent neutral responses include: “neither agree nor disagree,” and the percent unfavorable responses include “strongly disagree,” “disagree,” “poor,” and “very poor” responses. The number in the bar shows the number of responses in that category. The percent favorable difference area shows how these results compare to the benchmarks of the total University, a specific campus (Twin Cities, Rochester, Crookston, Morris, Duluth, etc.), the total college/unit, and 2103 same-unit results (when available). A “+” indicates that the score are percentage points higher than the benchmarks, while a “– “indicates a score percentage points below the benchmark. It is important to keep in mind that the size of the group affects the practical significance of group differences. In general, the smaller the group, the bigger the difference in percentage points needed to determine that a meaningful difference exists. Percentage Favorable Difference Scale Comparison to benchmarks are expressed as percentage-point differences in percentage favorable scores for the same year (2014): “+” shows that your score is above the benchmark “-” shows your score falls below the benchmark Dashes (“—”) show a comparison is not possible 13

14 Understanding Your Results Quick Guide to Percent Favorable
Review the percentage favorable bar chart using this quick guide to help assess and prioritize action. Consider the size of the group (“Valid N” column) in terms of the practical significance of the percentage favorable differences. Compare the proportion of neutral and unfavorable responses for more insight: A higher proportion of “neutral” than “unfavorable” can be an opportunity to shift employee opinion A higher percentage of “unfavorable” than “neutral” may indicate action is needed Quick Guide to Percent Favorable Assessment Range Strength >70% Favorable Gather more information <60 % Favorable Action likely needed >20% Unfavorable NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT It is often helpful to reference the quick guide chart when considering percent favorable or unfavorable responses in the context of the total N (number of responses), as well as also considering the neutral respondents, which are covered in upcoming slides. The question number from the survey SAMPLE 14

15 Quick Guide to Percent Favorable Absolute Scores
These focus on the percentage of faculty or staff responding favorably, unfavorably, or in a neutral way Here are some broad guidelines when reviewing survey results on an “absolute” basis Quick Guide to Percent Favorable Absolute Scores Assessment Range Strength >70% Favorable Gather more information <60 % Favorable Action likely needed >20% Unfavorable NOTE: Here is a quick guide for reviewing absolute scores: Strength–results are usually indicated by items with >70% favorable response. Gather More Information–results are usually indicated by items with <60% favorable response. Action Likely Needed–results are usually indicated with >20% or more unfavorable responses - especially if fewer than half of the responses are favorable. In general, a clear action item may be where 30% or more of the responses are unfavorable. It is important to look at all the data in a row, including the percent neutral and percent unfavorable when determining areas of likely strength, if more information is needed, and areas for possible action.

16 Absolute Scores, cont’d
Be sure to look at the complete distribution of responses Scenario A—half Favorable with a large percentage of the rest being Unfavorable Scenario B—One-half of respondents are Favorable with most of the remaining being Neutral 50 25 50 40 10 NOTE: Both distributions on the slide show 50% of the responses as favorable. However, you could draw different conclusions about each distribution by looking at the percentage of neutral and unfavorable responses. In the first scenario, while half are favorable, you see a large percentage (25%) unfavorable. You may find this to be an area where action is possibly needed. In the second scenario, most of the remaining responses are neutral (40%) and only 10% are unfavorable. This can be described as a “mixed” result. There tend to be a number of reasons for this result and additional information on the cause should be sought out.

17 Understanding Your Results, cont’d
Results include percentage of favorable responses compared to unit-specific 2013 data (when available), as well as 2014 total campus and University benchmark data. Percentage favorable differences between 2013 and 2014 are unit-specific and may indicate areas of change in a more favorable or unfavorable direction. Use the quick guide (right) to assess the range of change between 2013 and 2014. Quick Guide to Percent Favorable Difference Likelihood of Meaningful Change Range Low <5 percentage points above (+) or below (-) the 2013 data Medium >5–10 percentage points above (+) or below (-) the 2013 data High >10 percentage points above (+) or below (-) the 2013 data NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT Year-to-year comparisons are available for some reports. This quick guide helps provide guidelines for how to determine the likelihood for meaningful change year-over-year. SAMPLE 17

18 Qualitative Information
The qualitative lens can provide more detailed information about why items or dimensions received particularly high or low scores. Consider: Are there other sources of information that contextualize the key messages in the survey data? Are there ways to verify the key messages in the survey data against other existing performance measures or metrics? NOTE: Qualitative information provides the context for your survey results. Gauge your own reactions to the results. Is there anything that surprises or doesn’t surprise you? Is there anything that you feel particularly good or disappointed about? These are good questions to pose to your audience as well. Comment reports can also provide useful contextual data, but are only distributed at college/unit-leader level where 25 comments or more have been submitted. Comments are meant to provide support to themes already identified in the data, rather than serving as a focus for identifying respondents or drawing attention to outlying situations. Not all employees responded to open-ended comment questions, so consider the absolute data as you review comments.

19 Survey Data NOTE: This section contains sample survey data. The slides can be adapted by copying and pasting in the charts for your department or workgroup to be shared with faculty and staff. Additional background and talking points are included with the slides.

20 SAMPLE Summary of Engagement: Key Drivers and Metrics
<Chart content=Section1> SAMPLE This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide, and is very useful in providing the overall unit’s results at a glance. TALKING POINTS: This is a summary of the results for all the engagement dimensions, including the overall or cumulative engagement key metrics of commitment and dedication plus effective work environment. The 10 dimensions roll up into these key metrics. The “% Favorable Difference” columns on the right show how the results compare to the benchmarks of the total university (all system campuses), total campus and total college or unit, as well as compared to last year (when available), with a “+” indicating a score above those comparisons and a “–” indicating a score below the benchmarks. Dashes (“—”) show a comparison is not possible. For example, this may be due to data not being available from the previous year’s survey. As a reminder, broad guidelines on interpreting results are: Results 0-5 percentage points above or below the benchmark comparisons may not rise to the action-planning level Results 5-10 percentage points above or below the benchmark comparisons may worth considering, depending on N (number of responses) Results that are double-digits above or below the benchmarks likely indicates an area for further information gathering and possibly action 20

21 SAMPLE Results for Key Metrics: Commitment and Dedication
Focus: Motivating employee dedication and commitment to excellence. Consists of results from the following survey questions: <Chart content=Section2> This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide SAMPLE NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide. How “Commitment and Dedication” fit with engagement When employees are committed and dedicated to their work, they care not only about the quality of their own work, but are also invested in the collective work of their group, unit and university. This is a defining characteristic of employee engagement. Commitment and dedication refer to an individual’s level of personal motivation and conviction in their job. It is one of two key components in the University of Minnesota’s model of employee engagement, the other being effective environment. TALKING POINTS: Survey reports break out the key outcome of Commitment and Dedication to show which specific survey items contribute to this measure and how they rate against the benchmarks. The Valid N column shows how many people responded to each item. The responses for question 33, “Given your choice, how long would you plan to continue working at your campus?,” are represented in the report as follows: favorable = more than five years/or until retirement, neutral = three to five years and unfavorable = less than two years. 21

22 SAMPLE Results for Key Metric: Effective Environment
Focus: Supporting employees’ success with the tools and resources of an effective work environment. Consists of results from the following survey questions. <Chart content=Section3> SAMPLE This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide. How “Effective Environment” fits with engagement An effective work environment is one of two key metrics of employee engagement, along with commitment and dedication. Employees who are exerting their best efforts in their job will thrive and continue to give their best in a work environment that supports these efforts. Without an effective work environment, employees risk becoming frustrated. Research shows that frustrated employees typically do one of three things: 1) find innovative ways around environmental barriers and become engaged; 2) get tired of challenging environmental barriers and leave the organization; or, 3) lower their expectations and become disengaged. Paying attention to environmental factors is something that usually lies within a unit’s span of control and can pay big dividends in engaging employees. TALKING POINTS: Survey reports break out the key metric of Effective Environment to show which specific survey items contribute to this measure and how they rate against the benchmarks. 22

23 Employee Engagement Profile
SAMPLE This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide. It separates survey data into quadrants to help simplify areas for focus in action strategies. TALKING POINTS: The unique part of our engagement framework is that it contains two metrics (individual commitment and dedication plus how effective the work environment is in supporting engagement). This four-box or quadrant displays the Employee Engagement Profile. Hay Group takes the survey data and groups it into one of four quadrants based on its own Global Industry norms. Above average indicates results scoring above the norm and below average indicates scores below this norm. Respondents in the Engaged box scored higher on commitment and dedication and higher on effective environment. Respondents in the Disengaged box scored lower on both those outcomes. Respondents in the Detached box score higher on effective environment and lower on commitment and dedication. Respondents in the Frustrated box score higher on commitment and dedication and lower on effective work environment. Research shows that leaders have far more success by focusing on two areas of the four square–“detached” and “frustrated”–those with one measure of engagement working well for them, however something is missing. These employees are well-placed to move into the engaged camp. Although there may be a tendency to focus on the Disengaged bucket–this is unlikely to yield positive results, and there will always be some people in this bucket. It is often easier to have an impact on work environment issues than it is to address personal commitment and dedication (motivation). Therefore, focusing on the Frustrated quadrant can often present the greatest opportunity. Research shows that those typically in the Frustrated box are high-potential employees who tend to do one of three things with their frustration: Find innovative ways to break through work environment barriers and move into the engaged camp. Get tired of the frustrations and leave to work elsewhere. Get tired of their frustration and lower their level of expectations, moving into the Disengaged sector.

24 Strengths and Opportunities
How strengths and opportunities are determined: Key factors are considered in identifying your work group’s distinctive strengths and opportunities including: absolute scores on the survey items (percent favorable and unfavorable) and how your work group’s scores compare to internal benchmarks (Total University, Total Campus, and Total College). NOTE: Strengths and weaknesses are not simply the top-five and bottom-five rated survey items. There is more complexity to how they are ascertained which is explained here. 24

25 Strengths and Opportunities, cont’d
It is best to leverage strengths and identify areas for action: While the opportunities present clear areas for action planning, it’s also important not to lose traction in those areas in which your group excels in order to maintain and build upon your group’s key strengths. 25

26 This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide
Key Strengths Key strengths identify areas in which your work group is currently most successful. <Chart content=Section5> SAMPLE NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide. TALKING POINT: Survey data is organized into strengths and opportunities as another lens to help identify what is working well and what could be improved upon. If an item is a key strength or key opportunity, it doesn’t mean action planning efforts must be focused here. This is another source of information on the whole picture of engagement for your work area. This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide 26

27 This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide
Key Opportunities Key opportunities point to areas offering the greatest room for improvement. <Chart content=Section6> SAMPLE This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide. TALKING POINTS: Survey data is organized into strengths and opportunities as another lens to help identify what is working well and what could be improved upon. If an item is a key strength or key opportunity, it doesn’t mean action planning efforts must be focused here. This is another source of information on the whole picture of engagement for your work area. 27

28 Additional Question Detail: Commitment and Dedication Dimensions
NOTE: This section contains sample survey data. The slides can be adapted by copying and pasting in the charts for your department or workgroup for sharing results with faculty and staff. Additional background and talking points are included with the slides.

29 SAMPLE Clear and Promising Direction
Key Metric: Commitment and Dedication Clear and Promising Direction Focus: Connecting employees to college/unit strategy and goals <Chart content=Section9> SAMPLE NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide. How “Clear and Promising Direction” fits with engagement Employees look for opportunities to contribute to something larger than themselves and to make a difference. Supporting faculty and staff in connecting their work to the goals of the department, college, and university is critical to creating a high level of engagement. The University of Minnesota’s mission to teach, research and serve the public should be tied to the work of every University employee. College and unit goals should directly influence and connect to the work of its faculty and staff. This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide 29

30 SAMPLE Commitment to Excellence
Key Metric: Commitment and Dedication Commitment to Excellence Focus: Encouraging high quality education, research, and services <Chart content=Section11> SAMPLE This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide. How “Commitment to Excellence” fits with engagement Delivering high-quality education and research is critical to the University’s success. Ensuring that employees are working together toward these common goals requires an environment that encourages and supports teamwork as well as promotes innovation and continuous improvement. Engaged faculty and staff want to contribute to the success of something greater than themselves through their work. 30

31 SAMPLE Confidence in Leaders
Key Metric: Commitment and Dedication Confidence in Leaders Focus: Inspiring trust through open communications and leadership support <Chart content=Section12> SAMPLE This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide. How “Confidence in Leaders” fits with engagement The success of your work group depends largely on the quality of its leaders throughout all levels of the organization. Leaders influence how faculty and staff perceive the unit/department as a whole and play a critical role in reinforcing strategies and goals. Effective leaders deliver key messages and share important information with employees in their group in a concise, relevant, and timely manner. Employees will have high levels of engagement when they understand the work group’s strategies and goals, and are confident that leaders are capable of achieving objectives. 31

32 SAMPLE Development Opportunities
Key Metric: Commitment and Dedication Development Opportunities <Chart content=Section13> Focus: Supporting employees in developing and achieving career objectives SAMPLE This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide. How “Development Opportunities” fit with engagement Development is often cited in engagement research as one of the top drivers of engagement. Employee development includes the ongoing learning and development of skills and knowledge, including job mastery and professional development, coupled with career planning activities. To remain motivated and productive, employees need to grow in their jobs–and eventually perhaps even grow beyond them. Given the changing nature of work, employees may need encouragement and support in reviewing and assessing their goals and the activities that support those goals. Leaders are in a position to provide valuable career coaching and feedback to help employees reach their career objectives. Career planning and development clarifies the match between organizational and employee goals. Attention to career development helps attract and retain top talent. Development should be an integral part of the performance management process by identifying current and future development goals and making a plan to accomplish these. Development paths help align for the future of the organization. Opportunities for promotion and lateral moves contribute to an employee’s career satisfaction, motivation, and productivity. 32

33 SAMPLE Respect & Recognition
Key Metric: Commitment and Dedication Respect & Recognition Focus: Valuing employees and acknowledging their contributions <Chart content=Section14> SAMPLE This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide. How “Respect and Recognition” fits with engagement Faculty and staff who feel respected in their workplace will show respect for their work and for the organization. The University invests in creating the conditions that make work meaningful and rewarding for employees. And employees, in return, respect their work environment, colleagues and the reputation of the University. Organizations that make a reciprocal commitment of respect will have faculty and staff who take a personal interest in organizational objectives. 33

34 Additional Question Detail: Effective Environment Dimensions

35 SAMPLE Authority & Empowerment
Key Metric: Effective Environment Authority & Empowerment Focus: Encouraging employee autonomy and innovation to improve work <Chart content=Section7> SAMPLE NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT These slides can be replaced with actual report slides. How “Authority and Empowerment” fit with engagement Employees with appropriate autonomy and discretion to complete their work are better enabled to be more productive and effective. By managing how they work, employees are also more likely to find ways to fully use their skills and abilities leading to more input, innovation, and increased job satisfaction. This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide 35

36 SAMPLE Clear Expectations and Feedback <Chart content=Section8>
Key Metric: Effective Environment Clear Expectations and Feedback <Chart content=Section8> Focus: Clarifying performance expectations and providing regular feedback SAMPLE NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT These slides can be replaced with actual report slides. How “Clear Expectations and Feedback” fit with engagement Communicating expectations and giving feedback are two of the most important parts of a leader’s job. All employees need ongoing feedback on expectations and performance in order to continuously deliver high-quality services. Leaders who do this successfully improve the chances of high productivity and quality work for individuals, work groups, departments, colleges/units, and the University overall. Clarity regarding goals and priorities enables excellent performance by allowing employees to focus their efforts on essential tasks. Likewise, by continually “raising the bar,” ongoing monitoring and feedback regarding performance helps ensure that faculty and staff capabilities are optimally developed and used.   This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide 36

37 Key Metric: Effective Environment
Collaboration Focus: Supporting cooperation and sharing of ideas within and across work groups <Chart content=Section10> SAMPLE NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT These slides can be replaced with actual report slides. How “Collaboration” fits with engagement Good cooperation and teamwork help units develop better ways to get work done and react faster to changing needs. Collaboration can also lead to better cross-unit work and to highlight the work of the University within an industry/discipline. Collaborative behavior is an important skill for leaders and work groups. One way successful organizations meet and exceed their goals is by optimizing cooperation across work groups that rely on each other, which in turn leads to: Heightened levels of morale and pride among faculty and staff, resulting from greater involvement. Increased efficiency by streamlining process steps and eliminating redundancies. More efficient and effective communication, both horizontally across work groups, and vertically up-and-down the organization. Better decision making through the sharing of internal best practices and experiences. Higher levels of service satisfaction (i.e., student, staff, faculty, external contacts, the public, industry leaders, etc.). This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide 37

38 SAMPLE Support and Resources
Key Metric: Effective Environment Support and Resources Focus: Ensuring that employees have the skills, information and resources to do their job well <Chart content=Section15> SAMPLE NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT These slides can be replaced with actual report slides. How “Support and Resources” fit with engagement Engaged employees who have the knowledge and resources to perform optimally are likely to meet the performance expectations and perform optimally. Commitment and discretionary effort offered by engaged employees can easily be squandered if leaders are not careful to provide them with the workplace support they need to be successful in their responsibilities. Employees can only perform at optimal levels if they have the necessary information, training, and resources (e.g., tools, technology, equipment, and supplies) required to do their jobs effectively. Employees require on-going training and development to effectively handle the changing nature of job expectations and work environments. Well-trained employees are more likely to have and use higher levels of skill in their jobs. They are also more likely to demonstrate enthusiasm and positive attitudes towards their work, and exhibit higher levels of commitment to the organization. In assessing the training and development needs within your area, take into consideration the skills employees need to help the organization achieve its objectives. This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide 38

39 SAMPLE Work, Structure, & Process
Key Metric: Effective Environment Work, Structure, & Process <Chart content=Section16> Focus: Promoting innovation and equitable distribution of workload SAMPLE This slide can be replaced with the actual report slide NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT These slides can be replaced with actual report slides. How “Work, Structure and Process” fit with engagement We continue to be challenged to do more work with fewer resources. Operating efficiency not only ensures a productive workforce, but that our work environments run effectively, increase motivation and decrease frustration among faculty and staff. Employees closest to the work being performed often have the best ideas on how to improve work performance. Universities are increasingly competing for resources as well as faculty and staff effort and cannot afford to lose productivity due to inefficient processes. Tapping into employee feedback will have a positive impact on operating efficiencies, service, and employee satisfaction. 39

40 Next Steps: Action Planning and Implementation

41 Action Planning Overview
Action Planning Principles and Processes Engagement key next steps Prioritizing opportunities with data interpretation and understanding common reactions Action items, tools and resources Documenting and tracking action plans Sample action plans Sharing results NOTE: After reviewing the action planning slides you will be knowledgeable about each of these key areas.

42 Action Planning Principles
Fully understand the results and underlying issues. Gather additional information until the context is clear or root causes are identified. Involve faculty and staff where appropriate. Faculty and staff can help leaders understand the underlying issues and opportunities and find appropriate solutions. Keep it simple by concentrating on one or two issue areas instead of tackling too many areas at once. NOTE: These principles help leaders to continue moving forward in taking action and avoid focusing on data interpretation and analysis beyond the point of developing insights that can be acted upon.

43 Action Planning Principles, cont’d
Focus on issues within your control. Spend time on those areas where you can have the most impact. Provide regular updates on progress. Ensure that faculty and staff know that changes are being made based on their survey feedback.

44 Action Planning Principles, cont’d
The most effective action plans are: Clear and specific Link to unit objectives Focus on a manageable number of action priorities (1-3) Focus on action areas that can have an impact Clearly assign accountability Existing action plans will only need to be refined to ensure they are relevant.

45 Action Planning Process
Criteria for selecting issues: The issue is widespread and/or is having a significant impact Leadership has the ability to improve the issue Improvement will likely result in more engaged faculty and staff Each issue is aligned with the college/unit’s mission and goals Insights to gather: Driving force(s) behind the issues identified Groups affected by the issues (e.g., job level, tenure) Important considerations: Specific actions to be taken Resources and support needed Assignment of accountabilities Clear measures of success Key success factors: Ongoing support of those implementing action plans Tracking of progress on implementation over time Sharing progress regularly Analyze survey results Collect faculty/staff feedback through team meetings, focus groups Use Hay Group’s online action planning tool (Insight2Action) Track progress on a regular basis (monthly or quarterly) Identify the Issues Understand Context Build Detailed Action Plan Implement the Plan NOTE: Here is an overview of the action planning process.

46 Engagement Key Next Steps
Review & Share Results January–March Refine Action Plans February–April Implement Action Plans April–January Measure & Share Progress March–September All Leaders Share results with the unit/department; lead discussion of results to further understand possible areas for action Share data with next-level leader if no report is available. Set expectations that all leaders share results with the unit/department including roll-up data Share and refine current plans; if a plan does not exist, lead creation of an action plan for 1–2 actions to improve engagement Set expectations that all leaders take 1–2 actions to improve engagement Ensure that meaningful actions are taken and communicated Hold all leaders accountable for taking action and incorporate engagement in goal setting Comparison on “percent favorable survey responses” for metrics and key drivers from 2013 (when available) to 2014 Communicate and celebrate progress to-date Encourage 2015 survey participation Local HR Leads and HR Staff Provide consultation on individual leader report data when requested Provide context for data with key issues, goals, and initiatives as needed Provide guidance where needed for individual leaders on action planning Support leaders as requested with action planning and communicating progress Implement local communications plan for 2015 survey participation NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT 46 46

47 Engagement Key Next Steps, cont’d
Review & Share Results January–March Refine Action Plans February–April Implement Action Plans April–January Measure & Share Progress March–September Employee Relations Consultants Provide consultation on data in executive report in collaboration with HR Lead Consult as needed on data in the context of key issues, goals, and initiatives Support units with HR Leads in developing Communities of Practice locally, with groups of leaders such as faculty groups, department chairs, and administrators Support HR Leads in executive-level action planning Advise HR Leads as needed on local Communities of Practice Provide units with communications to support 2015 survey participation Leadership & Talent Development Consultants Create and roll out reports, deliver executive presentations and provide action-planning tools and resources Conduct additional data analysis; provide information and guidance for using reports to better understand the data and inform action-planning Provide consultation as requested to senior leaders and OHR leads and Employee Relations Consultants Identify enhancements/changes to the survey process for fall of 2015 Implement system-wide 2015 survey promotion and administration NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS THE FROM THE REPORT 47 47

48 Key Accountabilities in Next Steps
Everyone has a role to play in the action planning process Key accountabilities All leaders Communicate results; create and implement action plans in partnership with local HR as needed Support managers and supervisors within span of control in also taking action Involve faculty and staff in the process and keep them well informed Monitor action planning efforts and hold managers accountable for taking action Faculty and Staff Provide input into the action planning process including more detail around results Participate in the implementation of action plans Human Resources OHR consultation and collaboration are supporting local HR efforts Share best practices and identify common issues and solutions Assist units in action planning to support engagement as requested

49 Data Interpretation Considerations
Are there key strengths or opportunities that catch your attention? Which of the 10 dimensions should get your focus and why? What survey item may be an additional area of focus or action planning? Consider the following in addition to the data: Consider qualitative data to deepen and connect the survey data Your expectations based on your experience and knowledge What steps would you recommend to gather further information and how might you go about this? NOTE: As leaders bridge from reviewing and interpreting the data to identifying areas for action, consider the following. These questions can be for self-reflection or used as a small-group activity. Consider primary observations and focus areas for the next steps of gathering more information for action planning. Other considerations: What’s is the overall story in the data? What strengths are helpful that we need to celebrate and maintain? What is our low hanging fruit? What actions would have an immediate impact?

50 Range of Leader Reactions to Results
Shock—“How can faculty/staff have the audacity to respond this way?” Anger—“We’ve spent a lot of time on this but no one sees it?” Resistance—“This can’t be! The data is invalid.” Acceptance—“OK...we really might have to address this.” Help—“What can we do to change?” Be aware of your response to the data and seek to work with others to find solutions. Leaders can unintentionally derail engagement through their own reactions to the data. NOTES: Feedback is not always easily received, and the idea for needed change can also be difficult, even for experienced leaders. Leaders can unintentionally derail engagement by letting their own reactions to the data lead them to avoid taking action or act negatively. Therefore, leaders should be aware of their own reaction to the data before sharing results with the direct reports and refining their action plan. Shock: Reactions may sound like: “I can’t believe this is from my group.” “We’ve worked hard on this issue.” “This is surprising.” Anger: Can also appear as denial. “You know we’ve spent a lot of time on this. My direct reports and I have focused on this for quite some time and we’ve spent money fixing this. How could they not see what we’ve done already. They’re very unappreciative.” Resistance: Rejection, avoidance, or defensiveness. “This can’t be my data. Some other functions or business unit must be included in this.” “Our results are strong, so we don’t need to take action.” “This data is not statistically valid.” Acceptance: “I don’t like this data, but I guess faculty and staff told us what they really think.” Help: “What can we do to change?” “Where can we go for help?” It is most beneficial when leaders at the point of seeking help when sharing the data with their direct reports. This can prevent the data being presented in a way that may appear defensive and ensure the leader is open to hearing possible ideas for action and potential solutions.

51 Personal Power—What can I do?
Ask your supervisor, manager, or leaders about your group’s survey results. Offer to participate in action planning (focus groups, employee-led workgroups, etc.) Support taking action on engagement survey results to foster a positive culture. Check out the engagement web page resources. Ask leadership about action plans. Give your feedback in the next survey. NOTE: Individuals, including individual contributors and leaders who do not receive a report, still have a role to play in being engaged and helping to create a climate that supports themselves and others in supporting engagement at the U.

52 Action Planning Resources
NOTE:

53 Helpful Tools & Resources
Review & Share Results January–March Refine Action Plans February–April Implement Action Plans April–January Measure & Share Progress March–September Technology- Based Support for All Leaders Insight2Action (I2A) website (Hay Group)* “Interpreting your Engagement Survey Report Quick Course” (ULearn) and customizable PowerPoint E2 website action ideas and resource library (www.umn.edu/ohr/training/e2/consulting/index.html) Track action plan implementation on the I2A website (optional) Comparison on “percent favorable survey responses” for metrics and key drivers from 2013 when available to 2014 Communications Toolkit on the E2 website All University of Minnesota Employees Engage in survey data sharing and ask your supervisor about your unit/team report Engage in action planning with support of E2 website action ideas and resource library (www.umn.edu/ohr/training/e2/consulting/index.html) Support action plan implementation with resources on the E2 website action ideas and resource library (www.umn.edu/ohr/training/e2/consulting/index.html) Inquire about progress on action planning and stay up-to-date on employee engagement communications NOTE: THIS SLIDE IS FROM THE REPORT The E2 website is a helpful resource for tools and guides to help along each step of the process from sharing survey results to measuring and sharing progress in the implementation of action plans. These resources can be helpful to all leaders regardless of whether they were able to receive a survey data report. All staff and faculty play a role in supporting the engagement process from completing the survey to inquiring about survey results and progress on action plan implementation. *Leaders will receive a report, and access to the Insight2Action website, if they have 10 faculty or 10 staff members who completed the 2014 surveys. 53

54 How to Use Insight2Action (I2A) to Document Actions and Track Progress

55 Insight2Action Website
NOTE: The Insight2Action site link will be provided to leaders who have 10 or more faculty and/or staff who completed their respective survey. The I2A site provides several functions for supervisors/managers/leaders, including: Download the report Share results Create or refine action plans using a library of pre-loaded actions Track results and share progress

56 Possible Faculty Action Plan Development Opportunities
My department offers effective mentoring and coaching to support my development. Leader considerations: How can we leverage internal skills to help mentor and coach faculty? Information to gather: How could mentoring and coaching assist your professional development? Possible Action Plans: Support a faculty work group in suggesting resources and a process for a pilot mentoring program. Document results and adjust as needed. NOTE: This is an example of an action plan developed for faculty around Development Opportunities to demonstrate how the resources (key questions for leaders and employee around each dimension) can be used and to share an idea of how more information can be gathered to inform the action plan. A comprehensive and robust set of action planning tools are available on the Insight2Action (I2A) website from Hay Group, which is available to leaders with 10 faculty and/or staff who completed the respective survey. These same resources are available online in the action ideas and resource library (www.umn.edu/ohr/training/e2/consulting/index.html) 56

57 Possible Staff Action Plan Clear Expectations and Feedback
My manager/supervisor provides clear and regular feedback on how well I do my work. Leader considerations: How are performance expectations communicated to staff? How clear and specific are these expectations? How often are these discussions occurring? Information to gather: How do you ask leaders for feedback and guidance on job performance, especially when you encounter challenges? Possible Action Plans: Ensure performance goals define criteria for minimum, acceptable, and superior performance. Have solid feedback processes and monitor results. NOTE: This is an example of an action plan developed for staff around Clear Expectations and Feedback to demonstrate how the resources (key questions for leaders and employees around each dimension) can be used and to provide ideas on how more information can be gathered to inform the action plan. A comprehensive and robust set of action planning tools are available on the Insight2Action (I2A) website from Hay Group, which is available to leaders with 10 faculty and/or staff who completed the respective survey. These same resources are available online in the action ideas and resource library (www.umn.edu/ohr/training/e2/consulting/index.html) 57

58 Communicating and Sharing Best Practices
The top communication priority is to share results within the college/unit Encourage leaders to document and track action plans in the Hay Group’s I2A system or another system Encourage partnerships with local communications teams to promote actions taken as a result of survey feedback Identify if a local Community of Practice would be helpful to support action planning and best practices NOTE: The key to successfully impacting engagement is sharing updates throughout the process of action plan development or refinement, and implementation. If it is not clear which actions have been taken and that those actions were a direct result of the survey feedback, the trust hasn’t been built in the survey process as a vehicle for increasing engagement through feedback. This slide contains tips to keep the engagement process visible for all faculty and staff. Additional communications resources include: Information on Communities of Practice on slide 47. A Communications Toolkit is available online from the Office of Human Resources which contains key messages, sample templates for communications, and frequently asked questions.

59 Review: The Three Most Important Things About Employee Engagement
A survey alone does not create positive change. Only involving leaders, faculty, and staff in responding to survey results can create positive change in the work environment. Share your results. Disengagement begins when people who take time to respond to a survey don’t hear their results from their leaders. Take action. A few small, simple actions can have a large impact. Be certain to let faculty and staff know when actions were taken based on their survey feedback. NOTE: As a reminder, you can make significant impact by: Communicating your focus and support in the follow-up process. Planning and implementing concrete actions based on the results with faculty and staff. Monitoring the progress of your actions, making adjustments as necessary, and communicating regularly about progress.


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