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Hiring Managers: Understanding the Skills of Military Veterans and Interviewing Guidance Tweeting this session? Use #HireAVet © 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "Hiring Managers: Understanding the Skills of Military Veterans and Interviewing Guidance Tweeting this session? Use #HireAVet © 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 Hiring Managers: Understanding the Skills of Military Veterans and Interviewing Guidance Tweeting this session? Use #HireAVet © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved)

2 What Does it Take to Develop a Successful Military Recruiting & Retention Program? © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) Present the Business Case (get support => staffing, funding, budget)Identify Champion, Program Mgr (Dedicated Recruiters & Advisory Team) Skills CrosswalkOutreach Strategy Retention Program Training Program Education (Leadership, Recruiters, Hiring Managers, Supervisors etc.) Sourcing Strategy 2

3 Let’s Address Some Concerns You May Have Regarding Employing Military Veterans © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 3

4 Concern I’m not sure veterans have the skills we are looking for. © 2012 JupiterImages © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 4

5 What Comes to Mind When You Think About What We Do In The Military? Photo Courtesy of U.S. Army Photographer: Staff Sgt. Mike Pryor Photo Courtesy of U.S. Army Photographer: SPC Jeffery Sandstrum © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 5

6 Veterans Have the Skills you Want to Hire The military has over 7,000 job positions across more than 100+ functional areas and 81% of these jobs have a direct civilian equivalent. Welders Air Traffic Controllers Lawyers Doctors Nurses Supply Chain / Logistics IT / Computer Telecommunications Media/Graphic Arts Police / Security Transportation Construction Human Resources / Training / Recruiting Food Service Foreign Area Specialists Contracting / Purchasing Postal Operations Finance / Accounting Marine Specialties Engineers Material Handling Medical Specialties Machinists Mechanics Intelligence Plumbers Pilots Satellite HVAC © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 6

7 Concern My positions all require a computer / IT background, and most require specific programming skills. © 2012 JupiterImages © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 7

8 The Military Has Technical Experience Did you know that, in today’s highly-digitized military, a majority of service members work with computer systems daily? U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Rojelo Zarate uses a PRC 150 multiband tactical radio system to transmit data with a Toughbook computer at Camp Ramadi, Iraq. Photo courtesy of US Marine Corps Photographer: LCpl. Alvin D. Parson U.S. Air Force Capt. Jennifer Kennedy and Staff Sgt. Robert Goodnight, both from the 573rd Global Support Squadron, Travis Air Force Base, Calif., update operations and satellite data in computer systems at Castle Airport, CA Photo courtesy of US Air Force Photographer: SSgt. Dori Jones U.S. Navy Information Systems Tech. Seaman Michael Cadiz checks the RAM on a computer in the automatic data processing shop aboard aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) Photo courtesy of US Navy Photographer: MC3 Christopher S. Harte U.S. Army Capt. Jack Nicholson, assigned to 450th Civil Affairs Battalion, is setting up computer systems in Haswah, Iraq. The computer systems will help farmers track their cash flow electronically and help them with business decisions for the growing market near Haswah. Photo courtesy of US Navy Photographer: MC2 Kim Smith © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 8

9 But, What If There is Still a Skills Gap? Your company can choose to develop an on-the-job training program to bridge it. Funding may be available to pay for much or all of this OJT program: State-provided jobs training grants G.I. Bill © 2012 iStockPhoto © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 9 Eligible costs for reimbursement include: o course design and development o instruction costs for job-specific training o training materials and supplies o training facility rental o travel costs

10 Concern © 2012 JupiterImages © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 10 My positions have some pretty stringent education requirements.

11 Veterans are Educated DoD FY 2011 Officer and Enlisted End Strength by Current Highest Level of Education Attained Active Duty numbers only Does not include Coast Guard Numbers don’t equal 100% as not all reported EnlistedOfficer High School Diploma 84% High School Diploma 17% AA/AS or Some College 10% AA/AS or Some College BA/BS 5% BA/BS 44% MA/MS 30% Doctorate 9% © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 11

12 Concern Many of my positions require candidates to have professional certifications or licenses. © 2012 JupiterImages © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 12

13 Special Programs Exist to Help Service Members Obtain Civilian Credentials Military programs fund some or all fees for professional credentialing exams for enlisted members –Army Credentialing Opportunities Online (COOL) https://www.cool.army.mil/ https://www.cool.army.mil/ –Navy Credentialing Opportunities Online (COOL) https://www.cool.navy.mil/ https://www.cool.navy.mil/ –Air Force Credentialing and Education Research Tool (CERT) https://augateway.maxwell.af.mil/ccaf/certifications/programs/ https://augateway.maxwell.af.mil/ccaf/certifications/programs/ © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 13

14 Concern My company is focused on hiring diverse candidates. © 2012 JupiterImages © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 14

15 The Military is Diverse The military is made up of over 41% non-white service members and women make up 15-20% of each service. Photo courtesy of US Navy Photographer: Ensign Kristine Volk Photo courtesy of US Navy Photographer: MC1 TIFFINI M. JONES Photo courtesy of US Navy Photographer: : MC1 TIFFINI M. JONES Photo courtesy of US Marine Corps Photographer: CPL. DANIEL R. LOWNDES Photo courtesy of US Air Force Photographer: : A1C Wesley Farnsworth Photo courtesy of US Army Photographer: : Sgt. Juan Torres-Diaz © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 15

16 Concern I need people who can lead, manage and supervise – not just wait to be told what to do. © 2012 JupiterImages © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 16

17 Officers and Non-Commissioned Officers have Extensive Management/Supervisory Experience The military places its members in leadership and managerial positions within 1- 3 years of joining the service. The average 26 year old service member has more years of managing people than the average 30- something (and they’ve done it under much more challenging situations). Photo courtesy of US Air Force Photographer: Airman 1st Class Liliana Moreno Photo courtesy of US Air Force Photographer: TSGT MARVIN R. PRESTON © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 17

18 Concern My positions require a high degree of personal and financial accountability. © 2012 JupiterImages © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 18

19 The Military Culture is Built on Accountability The military entrusts junior enlisted members with more personal and financial responsibility for the people and equipment assigned to them than the average company requires of its mid-level managers Photo courtesy of US Air Force Photographer: Airman First Class Courtney Witt Photo courtesy of US Air Force Photographer: Staff Sgt. Jesse M. Shipps © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 19

20 Concern 20 Someone who serves in the National Guard / Reserves might get called up and have to take a leave of absence for a few months or even years. © 2012 iStockPhoto© 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved)

21 You Cannot Show a Bias Against Hiring National Guard and Reserve Members You can’t guarantee you’ll have any employee for a long period of time – don’t discriminate against Guard/Reserve members You already support civilian employees who take extended leave for pregnancy, family medical emergencies and personal emergencies USERRA (Uniformed Service members Employment and Reemployment Rights Act) is no joke! 21 © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved)

22 Uniformed Servicemembers Employment and Re- Employment Rights Act (USERRA) 22 © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) security/returning-military-members-allege-job- discrimination--by-federal- government/2012/01/31/gIQAXvYvNR_story.html?hpid=z2 Feb 19, 2012

23 Uniformed Servicemembers Employment and Re- Employment Rights Act (USERRA), cont. 23 © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) For complaint and settlement details on this or any USERRA case filed by the DOJ, please visit

24 Concern PTSD 24 © 2012 iStockPhoto I’m worried about bringing PTSD into the workplace. © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved)

25 The Disabled Veteran’s Barrier to Employment Recruiters, hiring managers, employees, and even company leadership can present significant challenges to employing any group of people with disabilities Many companies do not provide any kind of training for employees / supervisors / hiring managers on working with or providing accommodations to persons with disabilities Those that do provide training do not make it a routine part of professional development (i.e., only required to take it once) Very few companies require people in a position to hire to take awareness training regularly © 2012 iStockPhoto © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 25

26 THe Disabled Veteran’s Barrier to Employment, cont. The service member was able-bodied when he/she began his/her career The military invested a considerable amount of money to train and educate the veteran to do a particular job While serving in the military the service member sustained an injury that ultimately resulted in him/her leaving the service The veteran is now a young (age 18-40) adult learning how to cope with a life- changing condition while also trying to find suitable work that utilizes the skills he/she has already attained © DoD photo by Cherie Cullen/Released Keep in mind that the veteran’s disability was acquired after he/she entered the workforce: © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 26

27 Definition of “Service - Disabled” Veteran “Service-connected disability” sounds a bit scary and intimidating to those unfamiliar with the term. The Department of Veterans Affairs evaluates the veteran and determines that he or she has an injury or illness that was incurred or aggravated during active military service. Disability levels are rated from 0% up to 100%. © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 27

28 Definition of “Service - Disabled” Veteran, cont. Examples of disabilities include: - Hearing loss due to working around generators - Lower back injuries sustained during an armored vehicle accident resulting in wheelchair use - Amputated limb from a heavy equipment accident - Loss of vision from chemical solvent splash - Facial disfigurement from exposure to an improvised explosive device (IED) blast - Traumatic Brain Injury / Acquired Brain Injury as a result of a fall from an antenna tower © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 28

29 Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) PTSD – It’s not just a veteran’s condition! Anyone can show signs of PTSD if they have experienced: Contentious divorce/custody proceedings Traumatic loss of a loved one Physical or sexual assault World Trade Center / Columbine / Virginia Tech / Oklahoma City / airplane landing on the Hudson River… When your sense of safety and trust is shattered, it’s normal to feel crazed, disconnected or numb –most people would. © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 29

30 Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), cont. That said, many of our veterans who have served since September 11, 2001 have been exposed to some kind of traumatic combat-related situation: – Being attacked or ambushed – Seeing dead or severely wounded people – Being shot at – Knowing someone who was seriously injured or killed © U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brandon M. Owen/Released © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 30

31 Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), cont. © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) The service member may not even realize that he / she has not fully mentally addressed and coped with the traumatic experience until a trigger produces PTSD symptoms. The trigger(s) and the expressed PTSD symptoms could occur weeks, months or even a year or more after the traumatic event. © 2012 iStockPhoto.com 31

32 Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), cont. When most people think of veterans and PTSD they are afraid that they will witness the person having flashbacks and violent outbursts at work and that they won’t know how to handle that if it happens… © 2012 iStockPhoto.com © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 32

33 The Real Concern? Once explored, managers and HR professionals fears are actually that: They won’t recognize the warning signs of someone struggling with PTS They don’t know how to address the symptoms with the veteran if they suspect PTS They don’t know whether their Employee Assistance Program (EAP) covers PTSD They don’t know any additional resources to assist the veteran they suspect has PTS symptoms © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 33

34 Recognizing PTSD Symptoms Internal triggers: thoughts memories feeling out of control External triggers: Sights or sounds Smells Specific places Anniversaries/holidays News item / TV report Seeing someone who reminds them of a person connected to the traumatic event © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) PTSD symptoms: Re-experiencing event flashbacks / nightmares intense physical reaction (nausea, sweating, pounding heart) Avoidance Loss of interest in activities / life in general Avoiding places, people, activities Increased arousal Difficulty sleeping Irritability / outbursts of anger Jumpy / easily startled 34

35 Let’s Break Down The Skills and Salary Expectations of Military Veterans © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 35

36 A Breakdown of Supervisory / Managerial Experience, and Education Attained by Military Grade Level 36 © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) CategoryGrade Range Years of Military Experience 4-yr College Degree? Supervisory / Managerial Experience? Junior OfficerO1 – O3 O1 - O2 = < 4 years O3 = 9 years Y Y (40 – 120 ppl) Mid-Grade OfficerO4 - O yearsY Y (750 – 2000 ppl) Senior Grade OfficerO7 - O yearsY Y (5000+ ppl) Junior Warrant OfficerWO1 - WO22-7 yearsMaybeNo* Mid-Grade Warrant OfficerWO3 - WO48-18 yearsLikelyNo* Senior Warrant OfficerWO519 + yearsLikelyNo* Junior EnlistedE1 - E3< 3 yearsMaybeNo Mid-Grade EnlistedE4 - E yearsMaybe Y (5 – 25 ppl) Senior EnlistedE7 - E915 + yearsLikely Y (40 – 120+ ppl)

37 Veterans Have the Skills you Want to Hire The military has over 7,000 job positions across more than 100+ functional areas and 81% of these jobs have a direct civilian equivalent. Welders Air Traffic Controllers Lawyers Doctors Nurses Supply Chain / Logistics IT / Computer Telecommunications Media/Graphic Arts Police / Security Transportation Construction Human Resources / Training / Recruiting Food Service Foreign Area Specialists Contracting / Purchasing Postal Operations Finance / Accounting Marine Specialties Engineers Material Handling Medical Specialties Machinists Mechanics Intelligence Plumbers Pilots Satellite HVAC © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 37

38 There are Tools to Help You Translate the Military Jargon O*Net Online can help you decipher these resumes and cross-reference your hiring needs with military skills –Can search by Military Occupational Code (MOC) (i.e., 90A) –Can also search by military job title (i.e., “Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Operator” –Can crosswalk military occupation to civilian equivalent © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 38

39 There Are Intangible Skills as Well Just by serving in the military, veterans gain skills that are transferable: Project management Personnel management Training/instruction Counseling Operations Interpersonal communication Leadership Problem solving / decision making / trouble shooting Process improvement Requirements gathering © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 39

40 What About Those Unfamiliar Job Titles? Some position titles seen on a military resume won’t show up in O*Net Online: Commander/Commanding Officer/Platoon Leader Executive Officer Platoon Leader Operations Officer Command Master Chief / Command Sergeant Major Staff officer (i.e., S1, J3, N4) Action Officer Wikipedia is a great source for layman descriptions for and lists of responsibilities of these positions 40 © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved)

41 Example - Commander/Commanding Officer/Platoon Leader A Platoon Leader is the commander of a platoon (O-1 or O-2) Commanders are found at Company (O-3), Battalion (O-5), Brigade (O-6), Division (O-7) and Corps (O-9) levels Senior-most leader of that specific organization Significant responsibilities –Budget distribution & oversight –Personnel actions (legal, firing, military punishment) –Direction and vision of organization –Mission preparedness (personnel and equipment training, certification, qualification) © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation “I was a combat transport platoon leader…” 41 © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved)

42 Example - Executive Officer Found at Company (O-2), Battalion (O-4), and Brigade (O-5) levels Considered staff position Second-in-command Oversees and directs day-to-day activities of business departments that support organization (logistics, maintenance, personnel administration, communications, etc.) #Military © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation “I was XO for the 308 th Quartermaster Company…” 42 © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved)

43 Example - Staff Officer Usually identified by a letter/number combination (e.g., S-1, J-2) – The letter gives an idea of the size of the organization – The number identifies the business departments that support organization 1 = personnel administration/HR 2 = intelligence 3 = operations and training 4 = logistics/maintenance 5 = planning and policy development 6 = telecommunications and IT 7 = professional development and education 8 = resource management (budgeting, procurement, financial mgmt) 9 = concept development & experimentation (research, integration, test & evaluation) © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) © 2012 JupiterImages Corporation “I just finished up as the S1…” 43

44 Officer & Enlisted Salary Expectations, Based on Grade Military members earn a combination of several types of pay which determines their total compensation package. Base pay Housing Allowance* Subsistence Allowance* Position-based specialty pays (i.e., doctors, pilots, etc.)* Skill-based pays (paratrooper, linguist, etc.) * = not taxed © 2012 iStockPhoto 44 © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved)

45 Officer & Enlisted Salary Expectations 2012 “Rule of Thumb” salary expectations table CategoryGrade RangeSalary Expectations Junior EnlistedE1 – E3$35,560 - $43,688+ Mid-Grade EnlistedE4 – E6$44,704 - $55,880+ Senior EnlistedE7 – E9$56,896 - $78,232+ Junior Warrant OfficerWO1 – WO2$48,768 - $61,976+ Mid-Grade Warrant OfficerWO3 – WO4$62,992 - $82,296+ Senior Warrant OfficerWO5$83,312 - $94,488+ Junior OfficerO1 – O3$61,976 - $82,296+ Mid-Grade OfficerO4 – O6$83,312 - $127,000+ Senior OfficerO7 – O10$128,016 - $195,072+ © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved)

46 Lastly, There Are Questions That You Should and Should Not Ask a Veteran © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) 46

47 A Word About Interviewing Veterans 47 © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved)

48 Questions You Shouldn’t Ask “It says here in your resume that you are still serving in the Guard/Reserve. Won’t that interfere with travel or weekend work requirements? What are your chances of being called up?” – If you express doubts like that during interview process, and the applicant is subsequently not hired, you run a risk of having a Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA) complaint flied against you or even potentially a lawsuit being filed. 48 © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved)

49 Questions You Shouldn’t Ask, cont. “I see from your resume that you’ve had a couple of deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan. Seen any scary stuff over there? Did you get hit by any IED’s? How have you been feeling since you’ve been back?” – Questions like that may be interpreted by the veteran as you are trying to determine if he/she has Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) or a hidden disability (such as Traumatic Brain Injury). You run a risk of complaints being filed for a violation of USERRA or the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and potentially lawsuits being filed. 49 © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved)

50 Questions You Shouldn’t Ask, cont. NO: “What kind of discharge did you receive?” “Why didn’t you get an honorable discharge?” OK: “Did you receive a favorable (i.e., honorable or general) discharge? – The reason is that service members can receive a discharge that is less than “honorable”, but that is still considered favorable for many different reasons, and your digging for the reason why it is not “honorable” may lead you to ask other unacceptable questions that will get you into trouble. Type of discharge is listed on copy 4 of the DD-214 but not on copy 1 50 © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved)

51 Questions You Can Ask “Have you ever served in the military?” You can ask this question of a veteran prior to an offer of employment The veteran can choose not to answer the question. If he/she does answer the question he/she is only required to provide: – Period of service (i.e., “from 2002 – 2008”) – Rank/grade at time of discharge – Type of training and work experience received while in service 51 © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved)

52 Questions You Should Ask © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) Questions that get at the transferrable skills: Project management Personnel management Training/instruction Counseling Operations Interpersonal communication Leadership Problem solving / decision making / trouble shooting Process improvement Requirements gathering “Tell me about a time…” When Where Why How Who 52

53 Questions You Should Ask, cont. © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) Project management – “tell me about a time you were given a multi- phased mission to complete” (can substitute: run a rifle range, develop a field training exercise, prepare a unit for deployment). “What were some of the details you had to manage? What tools did you use to manage them?” Personnel management – “tell me about a time when you had an employee who was not performing to standard / was being disruptive in the workplace. How did you address the problem?” 53

54 Questions You Should Ask, cont. © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) Decision Making – “You’ve likely been given tasks or assignments in the military where you did not have all of the details you needed in order to complete the task. Describe a situation like that, and tell me what you did to ensure you had enough information to make a decision. What else did you consider before you made your decision?” Interpersonal communication – “what do you think is your strongest / weakest skill when it comes to communicating with others?” or “You’ve just learned some very bad news that affects your organization. Describe how you will let the team members know of the situation.” 54

55 Questions You Should Ask, cont. © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved) Leadership – “tell me about a time you faced a low morale situation” Requirements gathering – “Part of this job entails your identifying all of the requirements of the task to be completed – what steps will you take to do that?” Operations – “running an operation requires attention to many moving pieces, any of which could cease functioning at any moment. Describe a situation where you were the person responsible for operations and something went wrong – how did you identify the problem? What did you do to address the problem? Were you able to keep the other parts moving? If so, how?” 55

56 We specialize in helping companies develop military hiring strategies. Make the business case Sourcing Marketing Resume Translation & Interviewing Retention We do this through: Public workshops Onsite workshops Virtual workshops Individual web seminars (pre-recorded & live) Hiring guide (PDF download) 2x monthly “Ask the Military Hiring Expert” sessions (FREE!) 56 © 2012 The Value Of a Veteran (all rights reserved)


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