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MCESA Re-Engaging Disconnected Youth Summit II Breakout Pathway 3: Career Connections “Developing and Implementing Workforce Programs for Disconnected.

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Presentation on theme: "MCESA Re-Engaging Disconnected Youth Summit II Breakout Pathway 3: Career Connections “Developing and Implementing Workforce Programs for Disconnected."— Presentation transcript:

1 MCESA Re-Engaging Disconnected Youth Summit II Breakout Pathway 3: Career Connections “Developing and Implementing Workforce Programs for Disconnected Youth” Laura Tate-McHugh Director of Program Strategy and Integration Philadelphia Youth Network

2 Career Connections  Disconnected youth face challenges and encounter barriers to career attainment and career readiness.  All sectors must work collaboratively to build systems and partnerships that will enhance the career prospects of disconnected youth.  All sectors of society must collectively create systems and approaches to help support our youth through this process.

3 Career Connections Sub-Topics DEVELOPING AND IMPLEMENTING WORKFORCE PROGRAMS FOR DISCONNECTED YOUTH Laura Tate McHugh; Director of Program Strategy & Integration, Philadelphia Youth Network ALIGNING, INTEGRATING, AND RE-DESIGNING WORKFORCE CONNECTION PROCESSES & SYSTEMS Patricia Wallace; Assistant Director for Maricopa Workforce Development WORKFORCE PREPARATION THROUGH COMPETENCY BASED LEARNING Brianna Bendotti; Maricopa Corporate College, Vice President of Workforce Solutions Ron Stefanski: Chief Business Development Officer, ed2go, Cengage Learning Dr. Eugene Giovannini: President of Maricopa Corporate College CREATING RELEVANT CAREER OPPORTUNITIES BY ENGAGING BUSINESSES Caroline VanIngen-Dunn; Science Foundation Arizona Program Manager, STEM Pathways

4 Philadelphia’s cross-sector partnership dedicated to improving the economic outcomes of the region's youth by attracting, aligning and investing resources in youth workforce- development strategies. WorkReady Philadelphia

5 Philadelphia Council for College Access and Success Philadelphia Works Board Public and Private-Sector Investments - Government - Local and national philanthropies - Greater Philadelphia employers Governing Structure

6 Year-round and summer programming Career exposure and preparation opportunities Skills mastery WorkReady Philadelphia

7  Decreased Federal Finding School-to-Work Opportunities Act  Strong desire to sustain progress achieved under school-to- career initiative  Clear need for one entity that could serve multiple functions  Launched in 2003  Coordinated, city-wide portfolio of summer and year-round programs  Blended-funding to maximize resources Historical Perspective

8 88,000+ youth experiences 9,000+ work experiences supported by the business sector ($15M) 130+ organizations supported in delivering high-quality, workforce preparation programming to youth Notable Successes:

9 Youth understanding and mastery of skills needed to be successful in a 21st-century economy Academic enrichment Awareness of postsecondary options Learning  High School Completion  Work Experience  College and Career Readiness WorkReady Philadelphia

10 E3 Power Centers Occupational Skills Training GED-to-College WorkReady Summer WorkReady Program Models

11 Holistic approach to preparing out-of-school youth and youth returning from juvenile placement to achieve:  Long-term educational, career and personal goals  Self-sufficiency Provides supports along three interrelated pathways: Education, Employment and Empowerment E3 Power Centers

12 Broad array of educational services that support youth at varying academic levels including: Low-literacy supports GED-prep classes Post-secondary access and planning E3 Power Center Educational Pathway

13 Intensive work-readiness programming prepares participants at varying academic levels for unsubsidized employment. Job-readiness training Subsidized internships Community-service opportunities Service-learning opportunities Job search assistance E3 Power Center Employment Pathway

14 Increased literacy and numeracy skills 21 st century and work-readiness skills development Attainment of a GED or High School Diploma Post-secondary placement E3 Center Outcomes

15 Training model that offers opportunities for technical-skill development in targeted industries specifically for disconnected, out-of-school, over-aged youth (ages 17-21) who lack a credential. Contextualized academic and vocational training in high- growth industries Employer-recognized credentials Experiential and industry-informed Occupational Skills Training

16 Wrap-around services that foster participant success in attaining:  Industry-recognized credential  Employment and/or access to an advanced occupational-skills training or other higher- education institution Occupational Skills Training

17 Increased literacy and numeracy skills 21 st century and work-readiness skills acquisition Attainment of secondary and industry-specific credentials Post-secondary placement Occupational Skills Training Outcomes

18 The GED-to-College program:  Creates a pathway for disconnected youth to earn a secondary credential  Supports them through access to and persistence in college  Targets out-of-school youth ages who: lack a secondary credential test at or above the 7th grade level in literacy and numeracy GED-to-College

19 Focuses on connecting pre-GED programming to post-GED success in college by exposing out-of-school youth to the following:  Academic, professional and social-development activities  Transition support to post-secondary education and/or employment  On-going support to advocate and navigate the social, financial, academic, and bureaucratic challenges encountered once matriculated GED-to-College

20 Increased basic skills Attainment of GED as their secondary credential Successful enrollment in college as their preferred post-secondary placement GED-to-College Outcomes

21 Educationally-enriched work opportunities to in-school and out of school youth ages Six-week (120 hour), paid work experience that fosters the acquisition of the 21 st Century skills through work-based learning. WorkReady Summer Learning  High School Completion  Work Experience  College and Career Readiness

22 WorkReady Summer Components Internships Offer employment and career-exposure opportunities for youth with prior work experience and a basic understanding of workplace competencies. Work Experience Intended for youth with limited or no work experience. Service Learning Teaching and learning strategy in which youth address real-world issues relevant to their community.

23 System-Level Best Practices of the WorkReady Model Separate organization(s) with staff and a specific set of skills to: Serve as the backbone for the entire initiative Coordinate participating organizations and agencies Best Practice 1: Cross-Sector Collaborative Lead by a Strong Backbone Organization system

24 System-Level Best Practices of the WorkReady Model Best Practice 2: Developing Key Connections City-wide, cross-sector partnership Businesses Philanthropies Government Non-Profits Private Sector

25 $12(M) WIA/TANF-YD + $16(M) Leveraged Resources Opportunities Experiences System-Level Best Practices Best Practice 3: Capitalizing on a Diverse Funding Portfolio system

26 System-Level Best Practices of the WorkReady Model Best Practice 4: Promoting Career Connections through Contextualized Learning Opportunities Contextualized work experiences

27 System-Level Best Practices of the WorkReady Model Best Practice 5: Utilizing Technology to Enhance the System Better maximization and allocation of resources Increased efficacy User-friendly learning opportunities Debit cards Online applications

28 Program-Level Best Practices of the WorkReady Model Best Practice 1: Building Capacity in Youth Workforce Development Training Opportunities for Providers Includes Professional Development in: Program-implementation Program-enhancement workshops Peer-teaching opportunities

29 Program-Level Best Practices of the WorkReady Model Creativity and Innovation Critical Thinking Communication Collaboration and Teamwork Initiative & Self-Direction Productivity & Accountability Flexibility & Adaptability Best Practice 2: Measuring Attainment through 21 st Century Skills Assessment

30 Program-Level Best Practices of the WorkReady Model Best Practice 3: Adaption and Individualization of Program Services Youth Case Management Wrap-Around Services

31 Program-Level Best Practices of the WorkReady Model Industry specific work experiences    Credential or job placement Best Practice 4: Promoting a Post-Secondary Culture and Support for Transitional Planning

32 Program-Level Best Practices of the WorkReady Model Best Practice 5: Intentional Celebration and Recognition of Youth Success E3 Graduation WorkReady Summer Expo Awards Ceremony

33 Opportunities for Implementation, Replication and/or Expansion  Building better connections between workforce and academics through contextualized/project-based learning strategies  Capitalizing on employers desire – and need – for a 21 st Century skilled workforce  Partnerships with public agencies serving the same youth – blending of funds with Family Court, DHS, etc.  Increased support at the federal level for “special populations”

34 Challenges of Implementation, Replication and/or Expansion  Youth-level barriers to employment Criminal records, low educational functional levels, transportation, child care, etc.  System-level sustainability Remaining flexible to changing employment trends and specific needs of employers Building and sustaining relationships with new employer partners Identifying pipelines to family-sustaining wages

35 Other Ideas for Implementation, Replication or Expansion  Capitalize on existing programs and strategies – employer-based training programs, etc.  Be flexible and willing to target services to specific populations  “Sell” your program to partner agencies who may need support or have access to funding for services  Tell the story! Be prepared to talk about your impact  Do not exclude education!

36  Single point of entry for private-sector investment in the system  Staff dedicated to employer engagement and relationship management across the system (e.g., Business-Partnership Unit)  Centralized Operations Single point of entry for all youth via an on-line application Employing a uniform enrollment processes for all youth Utilizing a uniform worksite screening process Maintaining a central database (PYNDEX) Providing a centralized payroll service for all youth across the system Other Ideas for Implementation, Replication or Expansion

37 Survey Links and Shared Results Page Links Career Connections Survey https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/CareerConnectionz (Use this one in case the tiny URL does not work) Career Connections Shared Results https://www.surveymonkey.com/results/SM-TZKQSNYL/ (Use this one in case the tiny URL does not work)


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