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Ontology Engineering Lab #8 October 21, 2013. Review - Trial Query Exercises  What are the bones of the foot? (not sure this can be done in a single.

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Presentation on theme: "Ontology Engineering Lab #8 October 21, 2013. Review - Trial Query Exercises  What are the bones of the foot? (not sure this can be done in a single."— Presentation transcript:

1 Ontology Engineering Lab #8 October 21, 2013

2 Review - Trial Query Exercises  What are the bones of the foot? (not sure this can be done in a single query, explore but do not spend time beyond a reasonable limit)  What types of things are the parts of the knee joint?  What are the parts of the heart and if they exist how are these parts defined?  What are the documented relationships between the Right Adrenal Gland and the Right Kidney? 2

3 Exploring DBPedia  DBPedia is a structured store of information from Wikipedia. (see for a summary)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DBpedia  SPARQL endpoint can be found at:  Pages for individual resources can be found at:

4 Keystroke Shortcuts  Using “;” to repeat the subject term over a set of statements in a where clause SELECT ?city ?faculty ?students WHERE { dbpedia-owl:city ?city ; dbpedia-owl:facultySize ?faculty ; dbpedia-owl:numberOfStudents ?students. }

5 Keystroke Shortcuts  Using “,” to repeat the subject and predicate over a set of statements in a where clause SELECT ?abstract_1 ?abstract_2 WHERE { dbpedia-owl:abstract ?abstract_1, ?abstract_2. FILTER (lang(?abstract_1) = "en"). FILTER (lang(?abstract_2) = "zh"). }

6 Different Uses of the Keyword: “OPTIONAL”  The following query returns public universities that have both a Forbes rating and a Kiplinger rating: SELECT ?university ?forbes_rating ?kiplinger_rating WHERE { ?university dbpedia-owl:type dbpedia:Public_university. ?university dbpprop:forbes ?forbes_rating. ?university dbpprop:kiplinger ?kiplinger_rating. } LIMIT 100

7 Different Uses of the Keyword: “OPTIONAL”  This query returns public universities and their Forbes rating and Kiplinger rating if they have them both: SELECT ?university ?forbes_rating ?kiplinger_rating WHERE { ?university dbpedia-owl:type dbpedia:Public_university. OPTIONAL {?university dbpprop:forbes ?forbes_rating. ?university dbpprop:kiplinger ?kiplinger_rating }. } LIMIT 100

8 Different Uses of the Keyword: “OPTIONAL”  This query returns public universities and their Forbes rating and Kiplinger rating if they have either of them: SELECT ?university ?forbes_rating ?kiplinger_rating WHERE { ?university dbpedia-owl:type dbpedia:Public_university. OPTIONAL {?university dbpprop:forbes ?forbes_rating }. OPTIONAL {?university dbpprop:kiplinger ?kiplinger_rating }. } LIMIT 100

9 Different Uses of the Keyword: “OPTIONAL”  This query returns public universities and their Kiplinger rating if they have one else it will return their Forbes rating if they have one: SELECT ?university ?rating WHERE { ?university dbpedia-owl:type dbpedia:Public_university. OPTIONAL {?university dbpprop:kiplinger ?rating }. OPTIONAL {?university dbpprop:forbes ?rating }. } LIMIT 100

10 The FILTER Keyword  Up to this point we’ve restricted the result set of a query by binding a variable to a class using some object property. For example, the second statement of the following where clause “filters” the result set to public universities in New York State: SELECT ?university WHERE { ?university dbpedia-owl:type dbpedia:Public_university. ?university dbpedia-owl:state dbpedia:New_York. } LIMIT 100

11 The FILTER Keyword  The FILTER keyword enables filtering on string and numeric values. The following SELECT query returns public universities that have “business” somewhere in the english label. SELECT ?university ?label WHERE { ?university dbpedia-owl:type dbpedia:Public_university. ?university rdfs:label ?label. FILTER regex(?label, "business", "i"). FILTER (lang(?label)= "en"). } LIMIT 100

12 The FILTER Keyword  The following SELECT query returns public universities that have enrollments of more than 60,000. SELECT ?university ?students WHERE { ?university dbpedia-owl:type dbpedia:Public_university. ?university dbpedia-owl:numberOfStudents ?students. FILTER (?students > 60000). } LIMIT 100

13 The FILTER Keyword  The following SELECT query returns public universities located in latitudes between 51 and 52 degrees and in longitudes between -1 and 1 degrees. SELECT ?university ?latitude ?longitude WHERE { ?university dbpedia-owl:type dbpedia:Public_university. ?university geo:lat ?latitude. ?university geo:long ?longitude. FILTER (?latitude > 51 && ?latitude < 52). FILTER (?longitude > -1 && ?longitude < 1). } LIMIT 100

14 The FILTER Keyword  The following SELECT query returns public companies that have revenues of more than 1 billion (US dollars) or equity of more than 100 billion (US dollars) SELECT ?company ?int_revenue ?int_equity WHERE { ?company dbpedia-owl:type dbpedia:Public_company. ?company dbpedia-owl:revenue ?revenue. ?company dbpedia-owl:equity ?equity. FILTER (datatype(?revenue) = ). BIND(xsd:integer(?revenue) as ?int_revenue). BIND(xsd:integer(?equity) as ?int_equity). FILTER (?int_revenue > || ?int_equity > ) } LIMIT 100

15 The Filter Keyword  The following SELECT query uses the FILTER keyword, logical operator ! and the bound function to return countries that do not have an associated name of their leader SELECT ?country ?leader_name WHERE { ?country rdf:type dbpedia-owl:Country. OPTIONAL {?country dbpedia-owl:leaderName ?leader_name }. FILTER(!bound(?leader_name)). } LIMIT 100

16 Appendix: Answers to Trial Query Exercises  What are the bones of the foot? PREFIX fma: PREFIX rdf: PREFIX rdfs: PREFIX owl: SELECT DISTINCT ?set_of_foot_bones ?bones_of_foot ?bones_of_foot_2 WHERE { fma:Skeleton_of_right_foot fma:member ?set_of_foot_bones. OPTIONAL {?set_of_foot_bones fma:member ?bones_of_foot }. OPTIONAL {?bones_of_foot fma:member ?bones_of_foot_2 }. }

17 Appendix: Answers to Trial Query Exercises  What are the bones of the foot? PREFIX fma: PREFIX rdf: PREFIX rdfs: PREFIX owl: SELECT DISTINCT ?foot_part WHERE { { fma:Right_foot fma:constitutional_part ?foot_part. ?foot_part fma:articulates_with ?articulate.} UNION { fma:Right_foot fma:constitutional_part ?foot_part_1. ?foot_part_1 fma:articulates_with ?foot_part.} UNION { fma:Right_foot fma:constitutional_part ?foot_part_1. ?foot_part_1 fma:articulates_with ?foot_part_2. ?foot_part_2 fma:articulates_with ?foot_part.} UNION { fma:Right_foot fma:constitutional_part ?foot_part_1. foot_part_1 fma:articulates_with ?foot_part_2. ?foot_part_2 fma:articulates_with ?foot_part_3. ?foot_part_3 fma:articulates_with ?foot_part.} }

18 Appendix: Answers to Trial Query Exercises  What types of things are the parts of the knee joint? PREFIX fma: PREFIX rdf: PREFIX rdfs: PREFIX owl: SELECT ?joint_part_type ?part_of_knee_joint WHERE { fma:Knee_joint fma:constitutional_part ?part_of_knee_joint. ?part_of_knee_joint a ?joint_part_type. } ORDER BY ?joint_part_type Most query interfaces allow the use of “a” as an abbreviation for rdf:type. The ORDER BY clause can be used to arrange the result set in order of one or more of the result set variables.

19 Appendix: Answers to Trial Query Exercises  What are the parts of the heart and if they exist how are these parts defined? PREFIX fma: PREFIX rdf: PREFIX rdfs: PREFIX owl: SELECT ?part_of_heart ?definition WHERE { fma:Heart fma:constitutional_part ?part_of_heart. OPTIONAL {?part_of_heart fma:definition ?definition }. }

20 Appendix: Answers to Trial Query Exercises  What are the documented relationships between the right adrenal gland and the right kidney? PREFIX fma: PREFIX rdf: PREFIX rdfs: PREFIX owl: SELECT ?p1 ?intermediary_1 ?p2 ?intermediary_2 ?p3 WHERE { fma:Right_adrenal_gland ?p1 ?intermediary_1. ?intermediary_1 ?p2 ?intermediary_2. ?intermediary_2 ?p3 fma:Right_kidney. }


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