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Speech Productions of French- English Bilingual Speakers in Western Canada Nicole Netelenbos Fangfang Li.

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Presentation on theme: "Speech Productions of French- English Bilingual Speakers in Western Canada Nicole Netelenbos Fangfang Li."— Presentation transcript:

1 Speech Productions of French- English Bilingual Speakers in Western Canada Nicole Netelenbos Fangfang Li

2 The two language systems of a bilingual speaker may interact, the extent of which depends on:  Age of second language acquisition (Flege et al., 2003)  Language environment (Caramazza & Yeni-Komshian, 1974)  Among others

3 Objectives  Provide a comprehensive picture of bilingualism in the Canadian prairies  Vowels and consonants  English-dominant environment  Late bilinguals

4 Questions Are late French-English bilinguals maintaining two separate language systems in an English dominant environment? Are the bilinguals’ English speech productions similar to those of monolingual English speakers? 1 2

5 Participants 12 French-English bilinguals (6 female, 6 male) Born in Quebec, Canada Learned English at 13 years or later All participants residing in Alberta, Canada at the time of data collection Control group- 20 Monolingual English speakers

6 Part 1: Investigating vowel formants (F1 & F2)

7 Procedure Task: read a list of words in English and French beginning with consonants /p, b, t, d, k, g/ containing the tense vowels [u], [e], [i], [o] and lax vowels [ʊ], [ɛ], [ɪ], [ᴐ] Sample words in French and English (192- English, 192- French)

8 Acoustic analysis Vowels F1 F2

9 Acoustic analysis cont. Formants extracted using PRAAT software 1 st and 2 nd formants measured at the midpoint Genders separated Repeated-Measures ANOVA

10 Tense vs. lax French vowels : phonological status WordPhonemeAllophone Poule/pul/[pʊl] [i, u] [I, U] Allophonic variation Conditioning environment: (e.g.) Closed syllable laxing: High tense vowels are realized as lax in word-final closed syllables

11 Vowel charts Canadian English and Canadian French GENDRON, J-D. (1966). Tendances phonétiques du français parlé au Canada. Québec, Les Presses de l'Université Laval. EnglishFrench

12 Previous research MacLeod, A. N. A, et al. (2009). Production of high vowels in Canadian English and Canadian French: A comparison of early bilingual and monolingual speakers. Journal of Phonetics, 37,

13 Formant results females: tense vowels

14 Formant results as a whole

15 LaxTense I ʊɛ iueo F1F2F1F2F1F2F1F2F1F2F1F2F1F2F1F2 bf-be ****** me-be **** LaxTense I ʊɛ iueo F1F2F1F2F1F2F1F2F1F2F1F2F1F2F1F2 bf-be ******* me-be **** Males Females

16 Interim conclusion: vowels In general, late French-English bilinguals in Alberta maintained more separate language systems for the lax vowels than for the tense vowels. When comparing the bilinguals’ English speech productions to the monolingual English speakers, particularly for the tense vowels, bilinguals are attaining monolingual-like speech patterns in F1 and F2.

17 Part 2: Investigating stops (VOT)

18 Procedure Task: read a list of words in English and French beginning with consonants /p, b, t, d, k, g/ containing the vowels [y], [æ], [ɑ], [ʊ], [ɛ], [ᴐ] [ɪ], [u], [e], [i] [o] Sample words in French and English (264- English, 264- French)

19 Acoustic analysis Stops (VOT)

20 VOT (French vs. English) Prevoicing Short-lag Long-lag

21 French English Prevoicing Short-lag Long-lag

22 French English Prevoicing Short-lag Long-lag

23 French English Prevoicing Short-lag Long-lag

24 French English Prevoicing Short-lag Long-lag

25 Cross language phonetic influences on the speech of French–English bilinguals Fowler, C. A., Sramko, V., Ostry, D. J., Rowland, S. A., & Hallé, P. (2008). Cross language phonetic influences on the speech of French–English bilinguals. Journal of Phonetics, 36(4),

26 VOT Results

27

28 Interim conclusion: VOT French-English bilinguals maintain separate VOT categories between their English (L2) and French (L1), except for /t/. Their L2 is intermediate between monolingual English and their L1. Voiced and voiceless categories are behaving differently.

29 General conclusion 1 ) Are late French-English bilinguals maintaining two separate language systems in an English dominant environment? It depends. Vowels: no for tense vowels, yes for lax vowels Stops: in general, yes 2) Are the bilinguals’ English speech productions similar to those of monolingual English speakers? It depends. Vowels: yes for tense vowels, no for lax vowels Stops: No


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