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Slide 1. © 2012 Invensys. All Rights Reserved. The names, logos, and taglines identifying the products and services of Invensys are proprietary marks.

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Presentation on theme: "Slide 1. © 2012 Invensys. All Rights Reserved. The names, logos, and taglines identifying the products and services of Invensys are proprietary marks."— Presentation transcript:

1 Slide 1

2 © 2012 Invensys. All Rights Reserved. The names, logos, and taglines identifying the products and services of Invensys are proprietary marks of Invensys or its subsidiaries. All third party trademarks and service marks are the proprietary marks of their respective owners. WW HMI SCADA-01 What’s New in Wonderware Historian 2012 R2 Elliott Middleton Product Manager

3 Slide 3 Look back…

4 Slide 4 New Historian Unit Sales In System Platform Standalone Historian Fiscal Year

5 Slide 5 New Standalone Historian Revenue Fiscal Year R-IDAS Enterprise Express Standard First Full Year Of Historian 10.0 Growth Is Enterprise Licenses

6 Slide 6 New Large Tag Historian Units Fiscal Year , ,000 First Full Year Of Historian 10.0

7 Slide 7 Historian 9.0 Architecture SQL Server Retrieval History Blocks Storage “Pull” Data Acquisition “Push” Data Acquisition

8 Slide 8 Historian 10.0 Architecture SQL Server Retrieval History Blocks Storage “Pull” Data Acquisition “Push” Data Acquisition Storage Engine Replication Acquisition New “historian” hidden within 10.0 Application Server IDAS/ SuiteLink Historian

9 Slide 9 Replication Organized for faster retrieval More efficient use of disk I/O via caching Create tags & start collecting when Historian is offline Doesn’t “fragment” on updates 10.0

10 Slide 10 Storage Engine Retrieval Performance Retrieval time for 3-months of 1-second data for 1 tag using “best fit” with 1-hour period* *YMMV Legacy Storage Engine >2x faster >2x faster

11 Slide 11 Look forward…

12 Slide 12 The Most Amazing Wonderware Historian Ever Continued World-class desktop tools Rich query capability Low management cost & effort All new integration with Application Server Significantly higher tag counts Redundant Historians SQL Server 64-bit support (2008 R2 and 2012) New Toolkit

13 Slide 13 “Push” Data Acquisition Historian 2012 R2 Architecture SQL Server Retrieval History Blocks Classic Storage Engine “Pull” Data Acquisition Replication Acquisition “Push” Data Acquisition Application Server <3.6 IDAS/ SuiteLink Historian Application Server >3.5 Most changes apply only here

14 Slide 14 SMC Status Panel Name Changes Historian 10.0Historian 2012 R2

15 Slide 15 Upgrading Historian 10.0Application Server <3.6 1.During upgrade, Engine goes into store-forward 2.After upgrade is complete, Engine forwards data and resumes 3.Engine continues using Classic Storage until it is upgraded 4.After Engine upgrade, using new Storage Upgrade Historian First 1.After upgrade is complete, Engine immediately goes into store-forward 2.Remains in store-forward until Historian is upgraded 3.After Historian upgrade, using new Storage Upgrade Platform First Not Recommended No data loss in either scenario

16 Slide 16 But… Network/firewall challenges Must be online to start Historian tag data not always current History loss on Engine failover Application Server: Trivial To Historize

17 Slide 17 Engine Data Acquisition Throughput 0 50, , ,000 SustainedBurstLate R2 Values Per Second

18 Slide 18 Historian-Application Server Wonderware Historian Control System Application Server Historian Client What happens? Engine goes into store-forward New attributes not historized 10.0 Engine goes into store-forward New attributes also enter store-forward 2012 R2 +

19 Slide 19 Historian-Application Server Wonderware Historian Application Server Historian Client What happens? All Engines exit store-forward at once Can overwhelm server & network 10.0 Server manages store-forward exit Prevents overloading 2012 R2 1n

20 Slide 20 Scalability Targets 150,000 values/second 500,000 tags (e.g. ~3 second update rate) Example test load on workstation hardware (Hyper-Threaded)

21 Slide 21 Stress Testing ? values/second ? tags Oh wow!

22 Slide Platform 2012 System Platform 2012 R2 System * Varies by number of objects Reliable Data Acquisition Wonderware Historian Control System Application Server Redundant DI Objects Redundant Engines Historian Client On failover, history gap from: Detecting failure Starting engine from checkpoint* Subscribing to I/O* Initializing history* N/A for 2012 R2

23 Slide 23 High Availability Wonderware Historian Control System Application Server Historian Client Multiple Clients Stratus VMware/Hyper-V Cluster Reliable Collection Reliable Access Redundant Historians (2012 R2) Redundant DI Objects Redundant Engines

24 Slide 24 Configuring Redundant Historians MYHISTORIAN01 MYHISTORIAN02

25 Slide 25 MYHISTORIAN01 MYHISTORIAN02 Configuring Redundant Historians

26 Slide 26 MYHISTORIAN01 MYHISTORIAN02 Configuring Redundant Historians

27 Slide 27 How Does This Compare To: High Availability Virtualization Con: Susceptible to software failures, OS reboots, etc. Con: Complex infrastructure, IT support required (SAN) Con: Special setup/software for geographically distributed solutions Neutral: License cost (more expense for geographically distributed) Stratus Con: Susceptible to software failures, OS reboots, etc. Con: Premium hardware (cheaper to use conventional hardware x2) Con: Does not provide geographically distributed solution Pro: Single system to maintain Pro: No extra Historian license (redundant is +20%)

28 Slide 28 B How It Works Wonderware Historian Control System Application Server Historian Client 1 A.Client retrieves “partner” name B.On a failure, automatically switches A 1.Engine retrieves “partner” name 2.Sends same data to “partner” with independent store-forward channels Limitations No “self healing” of drive, history blocks, etc. Updates/inserts (SQL, CSV) must be repeated Client won’t switch on “store-forward” H1H2 H1 & H2 can be in the same or different locations 2 (optional)

29 Slide 29 Historian 2012 R2 Communications SQL Server Retrieval Storage Engine “Pull” Data Acquisition Replication Acquisition “Push” Data Acquisition SuiteLink (Single TCP Port) COM/DCOM Named Pipes WCF (Single TCP Port) “Push” Data Acquisition Application Server <3.6 Historian Application Server >3.5

30 Slide 30 “Data Compression” (aka “Filtering”) Example Every fifth value is identical to the previous value 25% of remaining values are close to previous %50 of remaining values change at a steady rate 4:5 80 No Deadband ?

31 Slide 31 Data Compression No Deadband Value Deadband Rate Readband Rate Deadband R2

32 Slide 32 Engine Historian Editor

33 Slide 33 Bandwidth Limits Physical Streaming Unlimited (0) Available for other applications Inadequate bandwidth 175 Physical Streaming Will thrash in and out of store-forward Physical Streaming Limit Available for store-forward 200 Limit 200

34 Slide 34 Storage Timestamp Limitations -5:00-0:30“Now” Real- time Future Expanded Real-time (only for “late data” tags) Late data x Thoughput ~10x Historian 9.0 Historian 2012 R2 (AppServer) “Values in the past did not fit within the real-time window” “Timestamp overwritten; values in future” Time Series Data “Now” InSQL 8.0

35 Slide 35 Late Data: Two Timelines 8:008:058:108:158:20Source Data 8:058:108:158:208:25Server Example: constant 5-minute latency Is it important to mark disconnects? Complete solution is a “channel status” independent of the data stream Affordable solution is injecting disconnect indicator What timestamp to use? Still requires data to be time-ordered

36 Slide 36 “Late” Data: One Timeline for Storage Source timestamp Example: constant 5-minute latency 8:008:058:108:15 Stored On Disk Server Time Store-Forward (3 minutes) No “gap” indication stored on disk

37 Slide 37 “Real Time” Data: Two Timelines Source timestamp Example: constant 5-minute latency 8:008:058:108:15 Stored On Disk Server Time Extended Store-Forward (2 minutes) Store-Forward (3 minutes) Out Of Order ? ? What timestamp for “gap”? Why is this a challenge? Out of sequence

38 Slide 38 System Platform 2012 R2 “Late Data” No data is discarded, regardless of age & settings “Late Data” Engine disconnects are not marked in data stream No latency between Engine & Historian “Real-time Data” Disconnects are marked On reconnects, tags remain in store-forward until source latency is passed

39 Slide 39 Replication Naming Scheme

40 Slide 40 Processing Time Retrieval Time R2 Using CSV Files For Data Acquisition 500 CSV files, each for 1,000 tags 100% 0% # Streams

41 Slide bit Microsoft SQL Server Support Historian Architecture OLE DB Provider runs in SQL Server process Some interprocess communication via shared memory 64-bit SQL Server  64-bit Historian (mostly, but not all) Solution in Historian 2012 R2: Native 64-bit Microsoft SQL Server Support Native 64-bit Historian OLE DB Provider 64-bit Process Address Space Ability to utilize all installed RAM Higher scalability will require 64-bit Phasing out support for case-sensitive collation

42 Slide 42 Historian Toolkit Compatibility Historian 9.0 Toolkit Continues to work with Historian No updates for this release Uses DCOM for communication Historian 11.0 Toolkit Query history for all tags, including Summary Tags Only works with Historian 2012 R2 (aka 11.0) Only.NET 4.0, Application Server 2012 R2 (aka 3.6) Uses single TCP port for communications All new interface (though mapping is straightforward) Does not include tag listing (use SQL)

43 Slide 43 The most amazing Wonderware Historian ever


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