Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

A Lower-Cost Option for Substantial CO 2 Emission Reductions Ron Edelstein Gas Technology Institute NARUC Meeting Washington DC February 2008.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "A Lower-Cost Option for Substantial CO 2 Emission Reductions Ron Edelstein Gas Technology Institute NARUC Meeting Washington DC February 2008."— Presentation transcript:

1 A Lower-Cost Option for Substantial CO 2 Emission Reductions Ron Edelstein Gas Technology Institute NARUC Meeting Washington DC February 2008

2 Issue >States and regions are beginning to develop strategies to reduce CO 2 and other greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. –Current focus is to reduce emissions by sector –Superior approach is to take a holistic view and utilize the energy source that provides the least cost, most efficient, lowest carbon-footprint solution to meet a given energy need >This approach requires a full fuel cycle analysis

3 Why Full Fuel Cycle Analysis is Important >For every Btu of energy of coal in the mine, only 0.26–0.29 Btu of that energy gets delivered to the end-use customer through the electric grid. >For every Btu of natural gas in the well, 0.91 Btu is delivered to the end-use customer through the gas lines. –Thus natural gas, due to a very efficient “full energy cycle,” is delivered to a home with much lower energy losses than coal-derived electricity and many other fuel sources

4 CO 2 Production by Fuel Type (pounds per million Btu)

5 Source: DOE/EIA (1) Energy lost during generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity Residential & Commercial Energy Use

6 Costs of Selected CO 2 Abatement Options

7 Opportunity >Optimizing how the U.S. uses energy has the potential to reduce CO 2 emissions by 375 – 565 million metric tons per year >Energy efficiency gains, using full fuel cycle analysis, are almost 4 quads per year

8 Strategy >In the near term, aggressive deployment of high-efficiency natural gas equipment in the nation’s homes, offices, and industries can achieve substantial CO 2 savings >In the midterm, additional GHG savings by reducing methane leakage from the nation’s natural gas production, transmission, and distribution systems >In the long term, renewables-based gas can be fed into the pipelines to create a sustainable, zero-carbon option

9 Reference Case: CO 2 Emissions from Natural Gas Systems and End Uses* * Excludes natural gas fired electricity generation Millions of metric tons

10 Near Term Approach >Displacement of electric-resistance-heating and oil based stationary applications >Displacement of lower-efficiency natural gas appliances >Goals: –Generate up to 4 quads per year of energy savings –Reduce CO 2 emissions by 300 million metric tons per year >This approach will lessen the increasing pressure to use natural gas for power generation as the growth in overall residential and commercial electricity use should be lower than current projections, and is less expensive than nuclear or CO 2 sequestration

11 Full Fuel Cycle CO 2 Emissions

12 Near-Term Strategy: Deployment of Gas Energy Efficiency Technologies Millions of metric tons

13 Midterm Approach -- >Reduced emissions from natural gas production, transport and distribution systems –Goal: reduce methane emissions by 50% >NGV deployment –Goal: Displace 10 billion gallons of oil >Achieve incremental CO 2 equivalent (CO 2 e) reductions of another 100 million metric tons per year

14 Midterm Strategy: Reduction of Methane Emissions Millions of metric tons

15 Long-Term Approach >Expanded renewable gas generated from forest and crop residues, municipal solid waste, and cattle and swine feedlots –Pipeline quality gas from biomass including forest residues and agricultural wastes can be produced at efficiencies ranging from 60-70%. This compares to biomass-to-liquid- fuels efficiencies of 45-60% and biomass-to-electricity efficiencies of 20-35%. (1) >Goals: –Up to 1 quad of pipeline gas from renewable resources –Incremental reduction of CO 2 e of another 70 million metric tons per year. –May be able to triple (or more) goal by 2040 depending on resource acquisition, market forces and U.S. energy policy (1) p.305

16 Long-Term Strategy: Renewable Natural Gas 15% reduction in CO2 emissions below 1990 levels Millions of metric tons

17 How will we get there? >Aggressive deployment of high-efficiency gas appliances >Development funding for breakthrough technologies >Upstream CO 2 credits for energy efficiency and methane emissions reductions >Deployment of renewables into pipeline gas Implementing this strategy will require appropriate regulatory and market structures, enhanced development and deployment of energy technologies, maintaining and expanding our nation’s current natural gas infrastructure, and expansion of current renewables incentives.

18 Recommendations >Congress and policy makers should consider a holistic approach to reducing CO 2 emissions and move away from the current practice of reviewing each energy sector independently –By taking a holistic approach, a more reasonable and less costly means to a lower carbon future can be discovered. If the approach outlined in this presentation is coupled with a robust use of renewables (solar and wind) for electricity production, expansion of distributed energy opportunities, and a more inclusive focus on “full energy cycle” and end use product and system efficiency, the nation can lessen the near-term need for new nuclear and coal-fired facilities, reduce electricity demand, and improve the economics of energy use for U.S. consumers.

19 Appendix

20 Carbon Emissions: Residential and commercial sector fastest growing carbon emission levels

21 Increases Tied To Electricity

22 Implementation >Implementing this strategy will require… –appropriate regulatory and market structures, –enhanced development and deployment of energy technologies, –maintaining and expanding our nation’s current natural gas infrastructure –expansion of current renewables incentives.

23 Full-Fuel-Cycle Efficiency Extraction Process- ing Trans- portation Conver- sion Distrib- ution Cumula- tive Efficiency Natural Gas 96.8%97.6%97.3% %91.2% Electricity Coal- based 99.4%90.0%97.5% % 92.0% 26.8%- 29.1% Gas - Based 96.8%97.6%97.3%33%-50%92.0%27.9%- 42.2% Ref: A.G.A. “A Comparison of CO2 Emissions Attributable to New Natural Gas and All-Electric Homes, October 31, 1990

24 U.S. Natural Gas Industry GHG Emissions (MM Metric Tons CO2e) Ref: GTI projection of EIA data


Download ppt "A Lower-Cost Option for Substantial CO 2 Emission Reductions Ron Edelstein Gas Technology Institute NARUC Meeting Washington DC February 2008."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google