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Thermal Imaging Cameras and Their Uses. Objectives Student will know each thermal imagers operation and features Students will understand the basic mechanics.

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Presentation on theme: "Thermal Imaging Cameras and Their Uses. Objectives Student will know each thermal imagers operation and features Students will understand the basic mechanics."— Presentation transcript:

1 Thermal Imaging Cameras and Their Uses

2 Objectives Student will know each thermal imagers operation and features Students will understand the basic mechanics of thermal images Student will understand applications

3 Countryside Cameras 4131 Bullard T3 Max 4110 MSA Evolution MSA Evolution 5000

4 Camera Features Bullard T3 Max Microbolometer Core –Will Shutter EI mode Relative Heat Indicator Electronic Thermal Throttle Super Red Hot Feature

5 Camera Features MSA Evolution 5000 and 5200 Microbolometer Core –Will Shutter Optional quick temp indicator with digital measurement Low sensitivity mode indicator Shutter indicator Heat seeker plus indicator Over temperature indicator

6 Bullard T3, MSA 5000 & 5200 Shutter The unit has an automated shutter used to calibrate or change sensitivity Fires about every seconds depending on environment When it fires screen will freeze for 1-2 seconds

7 Bullard T3 Max EI mode 2 levels of operation Normal- low temp scenes EI –elevated temperatures Automatically switch when object viewed >300 degree F Will shutter between modes

8 MSA Evolution 5000 and 5200 Low Sensitivity Mode Indicator Will automatically switch when TIC senses environment about 300 degrees F “L” appears on lower right corner of screen

9 Bullard T3 Max Relative Heat Indicator Bar graph on right side of screen Temp accuracy decreases as distant from object increases Accuracy of indicator dependent on; –Distance from object –Emissivity (ability to radiate heat)

10 MSA Evolution 5000 and 5200 Optional quick temp indicator with digital measurement Similar to relative heat indicator Temperatures from 32 degrees F to 300 degrees in high sensitivity mode and 32 degrees to 1000 degrees in low sensitivity mode Digital value only displays approximate value

11 Bullard T3 Max Relative Heat Indicator

12 Bullard T3 Max Thermal Throttle Enables firefighters to optimize the scene with the touch of a button Pinpointing hot spots during overhaul, searching for overheated electrical equipment, and distinguishing hotter objects from cooler ones Paints the hottest objects in the scene blue, leaving other hot objects white

13 Thermal Throttle

14 Bullard T3 Max Thermal Throttle For firefighter safety, the ETT blue feature does not operate when the T3 MAX detects it should be operating the Super Red Hot feature

15 Bullard T3 Max Super Red Hot Feature Heat levels are identified by color Starting at 500 degrees, heated objects are yellow transitioning to orange then red Provides enhanced visual awareness

16 MSA Evolution 5000 and 5200 Optional Heat Seeker PLUS Indicator Graduated color (yellow to orange to red) of portions of a scheme that are above 275°F(135°C)-yellow, 297°F-red, in High Sensitivity, or 842°F-yellow, 914°F-red, in Low Sensitivity mode

17 MSA Evolution 5000 and 5200 Over Temperature Warning Lower left below screen Flashing red indicates exceeded recommended operational thermal limits Tests on the Evolution TIC’s indicate that it will provide an acceptable image when subjected to an ambient temperature or approx. 248 degrees for about ten minutes. Exposure to conditions exceeding these will result in deterioration and loss of image.

18 Emitters Active –Produce own heat –Human Passive –Object that can be heated or cooled –Does not produce own heat Direct –Source of heat –Sun, fire

19 Active emitter exercise

20 Passive Emitter Exercise

21 What a TIC will do Allows you to “see” the area that you are working in. Dramatically cuts down the time for a primary search. –Narrows down the search area. Locate the seat of the fire quicker. Assist with size-up.

22 What a TIC Won’t Do Won’t “see” through water, windows or windshields. –Infrared wavelengths won’t pass through those types of mediums.

23 What a TIC Won’t Do Won’t “see” through furniture. Won’t “see” through walls, floors, etc. –It will “see” heat transferred through walls.

24 Fire in Wall

25 Practical Applications –Size-up –RIT –Light ballast, electrical motor/appliance issues –ID spaces quickly: attics, walls, cocklofts, utility chases, roof profile –Victim ejections, limb searches –Overhaul Extension searches –Chimney fire –Search

26 Practical Applications –Roof vent location “See” the truss system Directly over the fire Cut-man can see the area in need of cutting –Wildland/Brush –Haz Mat incidents –Top of water searching

27 Size Up – Fire location

28

29 RIT SCBA bottles and fittings will appear dark Reflective trim on gear will contrast with fire resistive material Firefighters will not be located in the traditional locations that civilian victims are found Look for signs of firefighter presence (marked thermal layers, hose lines,cold/wet spots, etc.)

30 RIT SCBA bottles and fittings will appear dark while straps and padding will absorb heat

31 RIT “Reflective trim on gear will contrast with fire resistive material”

32 Electrical Outlets Use traditional means to check for heat Identify problem outlet Obtain Thermal Image

33 Electrical Outlets Monitor area and ensure thermal outline decreases –Decreases causing unnecessary damage When is it time to open up?? –Anytime you want to.. Or if you see this starting to occur

34 ID Spaces Parapet height? Construction Type?

35 SEARCHING W/ TIC Interior searches should be approached with safety in mind. Do not abandon current safety practices –Teams –Patterns –Organization –Communications USE OTHER SENSES AS WELL Stay low REALITY CHECKS –Take non-camera views- every 30 seconds

36 Six-sided Approach First (UP) –Ceiling where heat is, heated gasses, extension or collapse areas. Where is it moving? Second (DOWN) –Floor. No holes, make sure you are not directly over the fire or other hazards. THIRD, FOURTH, FIFTH –Right, Center, Left –Look for hazards, egress SIXTH (BEHIND) –Hazards, changing conditions –Egress routes

37 Convection Waves

38 SEARCHES w/ TIC Camera Directed Search –TIC operator makes a room –Gets 6 sided view –“DIRECTS” search crews through space –Stays at the door or egress point for when camera malfunctions

39 SEARCHES w/ TIC Camera Led Search –TIC operator makes a room –Gets 6 sided view –Camera operator with the TIC searches the space –Unsighted crews stay at the door or egress point for when camera malfunctions

40 SEARCHES w/ TIC Point to Point –Accelerates searches –Does not search areas he/she can see are clear –When in doubt, search –Utilized in conjunction with other search techniques

41 SEARCHES w/ TIC TIPS –Review where you have been –Check for changing conditions –Communicate often and clearly –Establish landmarks, window sill tops, door jambs to evaluate thermal layer -Make one if necessary –DO NOT forget the basic fundamentals of proper searching –Reality checks often –Scan shoulder to shoulder –Let a searcher see the area prior to searching

42 SEARCHES w/ TIC TIPS –TICS can fail –TICS WILL FAIL –Cannot see through water, glass –Depth perception is altered –NOT intrinsically safe –Glass or smooth surfaces will reflect an image –Scan horizontal not vertical

43 Ventilation Use TIC to find ventilation points Vent over seat of fire See” the truss system Cut-man can see the area in need of cutting

44 Overhaul Use thermal throttle Overhaul hottest areas

45 Checking for Extension

46 TACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS Three main things we are looking for –Life Safety Occupants, down fire fighters –Fire Conditions Thermal Layering Convected heat and fire gasses Fire source –Structural Conditions Structural integrity

47 Hazmat

48 Wildland / Brush Fires Locate hotspots faster Better application of water Save on valuable resources

49 Water Rescue Look for shape as well as heat

50 Common Mistakes Made Neglecting the physical search –Relying SOLEY on the camera TIC operator strays from rest of crew Crews forget basics –Leave walls, hose lines Communication Standing up in thermal layer Crews now WALK, or worse, RUN through buildings

51 Common Mistakes Made Crews miss exits Manpower limitations Not clearing condensation off of lens and germanium Forgetting that the TI has no peripheral vision Missed holes in floors –Water on floor will look like a hole

52 Just Another TOOL in the BOX

53 References –Bob Pugh, Brian Lee and Bob Hnatko of the Chesapeake Fire Department –Deepwater Fools –Bullard –MSA


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