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On Solving Presburger and Linear Arithmetic with SAT Ofer Strichman Carnegie Mellon University.

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Presentation on theme: "On Solving Presburger and Linear Arithmetic with SAT Ofer Strichman Carnegie Mellon University."— Presentation transcript:

1 On Solving Presburger and Linear Arithmetic with SAT Ofer Strichman Carnegie Mellon University

2 2 The decision problem  A Boolean combination of predicates of the form  Disjunctive linear arithmetic are constants  Quantifier-free Presburger formulas are rational constants

3 3 Some Known Techniques  Linear Arithmetic (conjunctions only) Interior point method (Khachian 1979, Karmarkar 1984) (P) Simplex (Dantzig, 1949) (EXP) Fourier-Motzkin elimination (2EXP) Loop residue (Shostak 1984) (2EXP) … Almost all theorem provers use Fourier-Motzkin elimination (PVS, ICS, SVC, IMPS, …)

4 4 Fourier-Motzkin elimination - example (1) x 1 – x 2 · 0 (2) x 1 – x 3 · 0 (3) -x 1 + 2x 3 + x 2 · 0 (4) -x 3 · -1 Eliminate x 1 Eliminate x 2 Eliminate x 3 (5) 2x 3 · 0 (from 1 and 3) (6) x 2 + x 3 · 0 (from 2 and 3) (7) 0 · -1 (from 4 and 5) Contradiction (the system is unsatisfiable)! Elimination order: x 1, x 2, x 3

5 5 Fourier-Motzkin elimination (1/2) A system of conjoined linear inequalities m constraints n variables

6 6 Fourier-Motzkin elimination (2/2)  Sort constraints: For all i s.t. a i,n > 0 For all i s.t. a i,n < 0 For all I s.t. a i,n = 0 Each elimination adds (m 1 ¢ m 2 – m 1 – m 2 ) constraints m1m1 m2m2 Eliminating x n  Generate a constraint from each pair in the first two sets.

7 7 Complexity of Fourier-Motzkin  Worst-case complexity:  Q: Is there an alternative to case-splitting ?  So why is it so popular in verification? Because it is efficient for small problems. In verification, most inequalities systems are small.  In verification we typically solve a large number of small linear inequalities systems.  The bottleneck: case splitting.

8 8 Boolean Fourier-Motzkin (BFM) (1/2) x 1 – x 2 · 0  x 1 – x 3 · 0  (-x 1 + 2x 3 + x 2 · 0  -x 3 · -1)  (x 1 – x 2 > 0)  x 1 – x 3 · 0   (-x 1 + 2x 3 + x 2 > 0  1 > x 3 ) 1.Normalize formula: Transform to NNF Eliminate negations by reversing inequality signs

9 9  : x 1 - x 2 · 0  x 1 - x 3 · 0  (-x 1 + 2x 3 + x 2 · 0  -x 3 · -1) 2. Encode: Boolean Fourier-Motzkin (BFM) (2/2) 3. Perform FM on the conjunction of all predicates:  ’: e 1  e 2  ( e 3  e 4 ) x 1 – x 2 · 0 -x 1 + 2x 3 + x 2 · 0 2x 3 · 0 e1e3e5e1e3e5 e 1  e 3  e 5 Add new constraints to  ’

10 10 BFM: example e 1 x 1 – x 2 · 0 e 2 x 1 – x 3 · 0 e 3 -x 1 + 2x 3 + x 2 · 0 e 4 -x 3 · -1 e 1  e 2  (e 3  e 4 ) e 5 2x 3 · 0 e 6 x 2 + x 3 · 0 e1  e3  e5e1  e3  e5 e2  e3  e6e2  e3  e6 False 0 · -1 e 4  e 5  false  ’ is satisfiable

11 11 Problem: redundant constraints  : ( x 1 < x 2 – 3  (x 2 < x 3 –1  x 3 < x 1 +1)) Case splitting x 1 < x 2 – 3  x 2 < x 3 –1 x 1 < x 2 – 3  x 3 < x 1 +1 No constraints x 1 < x 2 – 3  x 2 < x 3 – 1  x 3 < x constraints

12 12  Let  d be the DNF representation of  Solution: Conjunctions Matrices (1/3)  We only need to consider pairs of constraints that are in one of the clauses of  d  Deriving  d is exponential. But –  Knowing whether a given set of constraints share a clause in  d is polynomial, using Conjunctions Matrices

13 13 Conjunctions Matrices (2/3)  Let  be a formula in NNF.  Let l i and l j be two literals in .  The joining operand of l i and l j is the lowest joint parent of l i and l j in the parse tree of .  :l 0  (l 1  (l 2  l 3 ))    l0l0 l1l1 l2l2 l3l3 l 0 l 1 l 2 l 3 l0l1l2l3l0l1l2l Conjunctions Matrix M :M :

14 14  Claim 1: A set of literals L={l 0,l 1 …l n }   share a clause in  d if and only if for all l i,l j  L, i  j, M  [l i,l j ] =1. Conjunctions Matrices (3/3)  We can now consider only pairs of constraints that their corresponding entry in M  is equal to 1

15 15 BFM: example e 1 x 1 – x 2 · 0 e 2 x 1 – x 3 · 0 e 3 -x 1 + 2x 3 + x 2 · 0 e 4 -x 3 · -1 e 1  e 2  (e 3  e 4 ) e 1 e 2 e 3 e 4 e1e2e3e4e1e2e3e e 5 2x 3 · 0 e 6 x 2 + x 3 · 0 e1  e3  e5e1  e3  e5 e2  e3  e6e2  e3  e6 e 1 e 2 e 3 e 4 e 5 e 6 e1e2e3e4e5e6e1e2e3e4e5e Saved a constraint from e 4 and e 5

16 16 Complexity of the reduction  Claim 3: Typically, c1 << c2 The Reason: In DNF, the same pair of constraints can appear many times. With BFM, it will only be solved once. Theoretically, there can still be constraints.  Let c1 denote the number of generated constraints with BFM combined with conjunctions matrices.  Let c2 denote the total number of constraints generated with case-splitting.  Claim 2: c1 · c2.

17 17 The reason is: All the clauses that we add are Horn clauses. Therefore, for a given assignment to the original encoding of , all the constraints are implied in linear time. Complexity of solving the SAT instance  Claim 4: Complexity of solving the resulting SAT instance is bounded by where m is the number of predicates in  Overall complexity : Reduction SAT

18 18 Experimental results (1/2) Reduction time of ‘2-CNF style’ random instances.  Solving the instances with Chaff – a few seconds each.  With case-splitting only the 10x10 instance could be solved (~600 sec.)

19 19 Experimental results (2/2)  Seven Hardware designs with equalities and inequalities All seven solved with BFM in a few seconds Five solved with ICS in a few seconds. The other two could not be solved. The reason (?): ICS has a more efficient implementation of Fourier-Motzkin compared to PORTA On the other hand…  Standard ICS benchmarks (A conjunction of inequalities) Some could not be solved with BFM …while ICS solves all of them in a few seconds.

20 20 Some Known Techniques  Quantifier-free Presburger formulas Branch and Bound SUP-INF (Bledsoe 1974) Omega Test (Pugh 1991) …

21 21 Quantifier-free Presburger formulas  Classical Fourier-Motzkin method finds real solutions x y  Geometrically, a system of real inequalities define a convex polyhedron.  Each elimination step projects the data to a lower dimension.  Geometrically, this means it finds the ‘shadow’ of the polyhedron.

22 22 The Omega Test (1/3) Pugh (1993)  The shadow of constraints over integers is not convex. x y  Satisfiability of the real shadow does not imply satisfiability of the higher dimension.  A partial solution: Consider only the areas above which the system is at least one unit ‘thick’. This is the dark shadow.  If there is an integral point in the dark shadow, there is also an integral point above it.

23 23 The Omega test (2/3) Pugh (1993)  If there is no solution to the real shadow –  is unsatisfiable. Splinters  If there is an integral solution to the dark shadow –  is satisfiable.  Otherwise (‘the omega nightmare’) – check a small set of planes (‘splinters’).

24 24 The Omega test (3/3) Pugh (1993)  Input: 9 x n. C x n is an integer variable C is a conjunction of inequalities In each elimination step: The output formula does not contain x n  Output: C’ Ç 9 integer x n. S C’ is the dark shadow (a formula without x n ) S contains the splinters

25 25 Boolean Omega Test 1.Normalize (eliminate all negations) 2.Encode each predicate with a Boolean variable 3.Solve the conjoined list of constraints with the Omega-test: Add new constraints to  ’ inequality #1 inequality #2 inequality #3 Ç inequality #4 e1e2e3Çe4e1e2e3Çe4 e 1 Æ e 2 ! e 3 Ç e 4

26 26 Related work A reduction to SAT is not the only way …

27 27 The CVC approach (Stump, Barrett, Dill. CAV2002)  Encode each predicate with a Boolean variable.  Solve SAT instance.  Check if assignments to encoded predicates is consistent (using e.g. Fourier-Motzkin).  If consistent – return SAT.  Otherwise – backtrack.

28 28 Difference Decision Diagrams (Møller, Lichtenberg, Andersen, Hulgaard, 1999)  Similar to OBDDs, but the nodes are ‘separation predicates’  Each path is checked for consistency, using ‘Bellman-Ford’  Worst case – an exponential no. of such paths x 1 – x 3 < 0 x 2 - x 3  0 x 2 -x 1 < ‘Path – reduce’  Can be easily adapted to disjunctive linear arithmetic

29 29 Finite domain instantiation Disjunctive linear arithmetic and its sub-theories enjoy the ‘small model property’. A known sufficient domain for equality logic: 1..n (where n is the number of variables). For this logic, it is possible to compute a significantly smaller domain for each variable (Pnueli et al., 1999). The algorithm is a graph-based analysis of the formula structure. Potentially can be extended to linear arithmetic.

30 30 Reduction to SAT is not the only way… Instead of giving the range [1..11], analyze connectivity: x1x1 x2x2 y1y1 y2y2 g1g1 g2g2 zu1u1 f1f1 f2f2 u2u2 Further analysis will result in a state-space of 4 Range of all var’s: State-space: x 1, y 1, x 2, y 2 :{0-1} u 1, f 1, f 2, u 2 : {0-3} g 1, g 2, z : {0-2} State-space: ~10 5 Q: Can this approach be extended to Linear Arithmetic?


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