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AuthorEraScientific Method Group Support Problem Group Examples Malthus Ricardo Marx David Harvey’s Population-Resource Analysis.

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Presentation on theme: "AuthorEraScientific Method Group Support Problem Group Examples Malthus Ricardo Marx David Harvey’s Population-Resource Analysis."— Presentation transcript:

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2 AuthorEraScientific Method Group Support Problem Group Examples Malthus Ricardo Marx David Harvey’s Population-Resource Analysis

3 AuthorEraScientific Method Group Support Problem Group Examples Malthus late 18th Ricardo Marx Malthus: Population-Resource Analysis

4 AuthorEraScientific Method Group Support Problem Group Examples Malthus late 18th logical empiricism Ricardo Marx Malthus: Population-Resource Analysis “over”population: but which groups are in “excess”?

5 AuthorEraScientific Method Group Support Problem Group Examples Malthus late 18th logical empiricism landed gentry Ricardo Marx Malthus: Population-Resource Analysis 11 th Duke of Devonshire. The Duke’s Chatsworth manor house consists 297 rooms, 112 fireplaces, 56 loos (toilets), and 2,084 light bulbs. The beautiful house is stacked with books, paintings, and sculpture collected for 450 years. He also owns another 40,000 acres, including Bolton Abbey, the most romantic ruin in Yorkshire; Lismore Castle in Ireland; a chunk of the West End in London; and a goodly extent of Eastbourne, a shabbily genteel resort on the Sussex coast. Unable to pay his bills in the 1950s, the duke opened his estates to the public. By 2002, Chatsworth was bringing in 500,000 visitors a year and making a profit. The Chatsworth staff, more than 600 of them, all of whom felt he had known and respected them, put on their uniforms and lined the road that led through the deer park to Edensor (see photo). Source: The Economist, 13 May th Duke of Devonshire. The Duke’s Chatsworth manor house consists 297 rooms, 112 fireplaces, 56 loos (toilets), and 2,084 light bulbs. The beautiful house is stacked with books, paintings, and sculpture collected for 450 years. He also owns another 40,000 acres, including Bolton Abbey, the most romantic ruin in Yorkshire; Lismore Castle in Ireland; a chunk of the West End in London; and a goodly extent of Eastbourne, a shabbily genteel resort on the Sussex coast. Unable to pay his bills in the 1950s, the duke opened his estates to the public. By 2002, Chatsworth was bringing in 500,000 visitors a year and making a profit. The Chatsworth staff, more than 600 of them, all of whom felt he had known and respected them, put on their uniforms and lined the road that led through the deer park to Edensor (see photo). Source: The Economist, 13 May 2004.

6 AuthorEraScientific Method Group Support Problem Group Examples Malthus late 18th logical empiricism landed gentry poorPoor Laws 1815 and 1846 large landowners owned 75 % of cultivated land Ricardo Marx Malthus: Population-Resource Analysis

7 AuthorEraScientific Method Group Support Problem Group Examples Malthus late 18th logical empiricism landed gentry poorPoor Laws large landowners owned 75 % of cultivated land Ricardo early 19th Marx Ricardo: Population-Resource Analysis

8 AuthorEraScientific Method Group Support Problem Group Examples Malthus late 18th logical empiricism landed gentry poorPoor Laws large landowners owned 75 % of cultivated land Ricardo early 19th normative science Marx Ricardo: Population-Resource Analysis

9 AuthorEraScientific Method Group Support Problem Group Examples Malthus late 18th logical empiricism landed gentry poorPoor Laws large landowners owned 75 % of cultivated land Ricardo early 19th normative science industrial entrepreneur Marx Ricardo: Population-Resource Analysis

10 AuthorEraScientific Method Group Support Problem Group Examples Malthus late 18th logical empiricism landed gentry poor Poor Laws large landowners owned 75 % of cultivated land Ricardo early 19th normative science industrial entrepreneur landed gentry Gilded Age: 300 estates on the Hudson River 1860s: 100 British sons of nobility married U.S. daughters of wealthy Marx Ricardo: Population-Resource Analysis English Enclosure Acts of 1773, 1845 to 1882 enclosed 6.8 million acres of land (almost 11,000 square miles) from communal land into private property. From 1880s to 1930s, the shift in the world’s economy from Western Europe to the USA resulted in the greatest transfer of art: Old Master paintings, Chinese porcelain, furniture, altar pieces, books, manuscripts, clocks, and carpets. The European elites sold; the USA wealthy bought. For example, when John Pierpont Morgan died in 1913, his art collection was valued at $60 million; today, it would be in the billions.

11 Population-Resource Analysis AuthorEraScientific Method Group Support Problem Group Examples Malthus late 18th logical empiricism landed gentry poorPoor Laws large landowners owned 75 % of cultivated land Ricardo early 19th normative science industrial entrepreneur landed gentry Gilded Age 1860s: 100 British nobility sons married US daughters of the wealthy Marx late 19th Marx:

12 AuthorEraScientific Method Group Support Problem Group Examples Malthus late 18th logical empiricism landed gentry poorPoor Laws large landowners owned 75 % of cultivated land Ricardo early 19th normative science industrial entrepreneur landed gentry Gilded Age 1860s: 100 British nobility sons married US daughters of the wealthy Marx late 19th dialectical materialism Population-Resource Analysis Marx:

13 AuthorEraScientific Method Group Support Problem Group Examples Malthus late 18th logical empiricism landed gentry poorPoor Laws large landowners owned 75 % of cultivated land Ricardo early 19th normative science industrial entrepreneur landed gentry Gilded Age 1860s: 100 British nobility sons married US daughters of the wealthy Marx late 19th dialectical materialism working class Population-Resource Analysis Marx:

14 AuthorEraScientific Method Group Support Problem Group Examples Malthus late 18th logical empiricism landed gentry poorPoor Laws large landowners owned 75 % of cultivated land Ricardo early 19th normative science industrial entrepreneur landed gentry Gilded Age 1860s: 100 British nobility sons married US daughters of the wealthy Marx late 19th dialectical materialism working class capitalistsbad housing, low wages, long hours strikes Population-Resource Analysis Marx: How do these three perspectives inform population-resource relationships?

15 Alternative Options : Population-Resource “There are too many people in the world because the particular ends we have in view and the materials available from nature, that we have the will and the way to use, are not sufficient to provide us with those things to which we are accustomed.” Several alternative changes in population-resource relationships result from the above statement: change the ends we have in mind and the social organization change our technical and cultural appraisals of nature change our views of the things to which we are accustomed or alter our population numbers!


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