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Lessons Learned From STAAR Released Items. “Follow” ESC 17 Instructional Leaders On Twitter

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Presentation on theme: "Lessons Learned From STAAR Released Items. “Follow” ESC 17 Instructional Leaders On Twitter"— Presentation transcript:

1 Lessons Learned From STAAR Released Items

2 “Follow” ESC 17 Instructional Leaders On Twitter

3 10/20/2011 Leaders/

4 Subscribe to the Assessment and Accountability Listserv =ASSESSMENT_AND_ACCOUNTABILITY& A=1http://listserv.esc17.net/scripts/wa.exe?SUBED1 =ASSESSMENT_AND_ACCOUNTABILITY& A=1

5 360 Walkthrough at New Deal High School November 29, 2011

6 A Good Education Creating a Compulsory Learning Environment

7 To lead is to live dangerously.. Because when leadership counts, when you lead people through difficult change, you challenge what people hold dear—their daily habits, tools, loyalties and ways of thinking—with nothing more to offer perhaps than a possibility. ----Leadership on the Line -- by Ronald Heifitz & Marty Linsky

8 “Failure is not fatal, but failure to change might be.” --- John Wooden

9 Where We Are? TAKS brought us better instruction in our schools than we have ever seen before. See elementary science if you do not believe me. TAKS also brought us deeper instruction. TAKS taught us to teach to the item. Many have had success and high scores that they use to argue against systemic change. We still do not have a “feedback” culture generally speaking.

10 Concepts For Today Rigor Connections Concepts Readiness

11 Concept Map

12 Benjamin Bloom’s Taxonomy Knowledge: emphasizing the recall of information Comprehension: rephrasing information in own words Application: using information to solve problems Analysis: taking ideas and issues apart and examining their components Synthesis: taking existing elements and creating something new Evaluation: judging the quality of items based on existing or created standards

13 Shift in Rigor

14 Fifth Grade Math Grade 5 Math TAKS B A A C C A B A B B C A A A A B A B B B B A A D C A B D A B A C E A A B B A A A A B B C Distribution of Standards Compared TAKS STAAR

15 Algebra I Distribution of Standards Compared TAKS STAAR

16 Regional Readiness Standards % Correct --Algebra 1 A1(D) represent relationships among quantities using [concrete] models, tables, graphs, diagrams, verbal descriptions, equations, and inequalities; % Correct A7(B) investigate methods for solving linear equations and inequalities using [concrete] models, graphs, and the properties of equality, select a method, and solve the equations and inequalities; -- 46% Correct A5 (c) use, translate, and make connections among algebraic, tabular, graphical, or verbal descriptions of linear functions. --51% Correct Creating a Compulsory Learning Environment

17 3. (10) Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student recognizes that a line can be used to represent numbers and fractions and their properties and relationships. The student is expected to locate and name points on a number line using whole numbers and fractions, including halves and fourths.

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19 (6) Force, motion, and energy. The student knows that energy occurs in many forms and can be observed in cycles, patterns, and systems. The student is expected to: (B) demonstrate that the flow of electricity in circuits requires a complete path through which an electric current can pass and can produce light, heat, and sound;

20 6) Force, motion, and energy. The student knows that energy occurs in many forms and can be observed in cycles, patterns, and systems. The student is expected to: (B) demonstrate that the flow of electricity in circuits requires a complete path through which an electric current can pass and can produce light, heat, and sound;

21 5) History. The student understands the challenges confronted by the government and its leaders in the early years of the republic and the Age of Jackson. The student is expected to: (E) identify the foreign policies of presidents Washington through Monroe and explain the impact of Washington's Farewell Address and the Monroe Doctrine;

22 (5) History. The student understands the challenges confronted by the government and its leaders in the early years of the republic and the Age of Jackson. The student is expected to: (E) identify the foreign policies of presidents Washington through Monroe and explain the impact of Washington's Farewell Address and the Monroe Doctrine;

23 Integration of Process Skills

24 7 th Grade gone to 4 th Grade

25 The Structure of Knowledge Concept Topic Principle Generalization FACTSFACTS FACTSFACTS FACTSFACTS FACTSFACTS FACTSFACTS FACTSFACTS FACTSFACTS FACTSFACTS Lynn Erickson -- Concept-Based Curriculum and Instruction for the Thinking Classroom, 2007

26 Structure of Knowledge Across the Core Content Areas Principle/ Generalization Concepts Topics Facts Similarities and differences between and among people influence relationships. Differences between and among people can create conflict. Conflict in American Society Influence Relationships Conflict Patterns TEKS SS 8.24 (a-e) SC 8.6 (Biology 12) ELA 8.12 There is a relationship of mutual influence between organisms and their environment. Interdependence occurs among living systems. Forms of written texts have distinguishing characteristics. Different types of texts serve different purposes. Influence Relationships Systems Interdependence Conflict Relationships Change Ecosystems in the Northern Hemisphere American Literature During the Civil War Conflict between white settlers and Native Americans led to forced migration of the American natives. Organisms are organized into species. Organisms depend on unique resources to survive. Species vary from ecosystem to ecosystem. Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe was a novel written to influence public opinion concerning slavery. Proponents of states’ rights and abolitionists both used written texts to explain their views and influence public opinion.

27 FactsTopicsConceptsGeneralizations/ Principles Complexity of Content Complexity of Processing Remember Create Understand Evaluate Apply Analyze

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29 FactsTopicsConceptsGeneralizations/ Principles Complexity of Content Complexity of Processing Remember Create Understand Evaluate Apply Analyze

30 Level of Complexity Activity You have a STAAR Released Items and part of a 2009 Released TAKS in the center of your table. You have a blank chart at your table. Look at each question and mark it on the chart with these labels. S1 for STAAR #1 or T4 for say TAKS #4. Also create a dot with that label as well. Take the dot and put it on the big chart hanging on the wall.

31 Connections

32 Connecting Topics ColonizationRevolution New Nation Manifest Destiny Civil War

33 (5) History. The student understands the challenges confronted by the government and its leaders in the early years of the republic and the Age of Jackson. The student is expected to: (E) identify the foreign policies of presidents Washington through Monroe and explain the impact of Washington's Farewell Address and the Monroe Doctrine;

34 Concepts and More Concepts

35 Connect to Concepts ColonizationManifest Destiny New Nation Revolution Civil War Expansion--- Democracy --- Conflict --- Culture--- Industrialization

36 Conceptual Instruction

37 (5) History. The student understands the challenges confronted by the government and its leaders in the early years of the republic and the Age of Jackson. The student is expected to: (E) identify the foreign policies of presidents Washington through Monroe and explain the impact of Washington's Farewell Address and the Monroe Doctrine;

38 Integration of Process Skills

39 The Structure of Knowledge Concept Topic Principle Generalization FACTSFACTS FACTSFACTS FACTSFACTS FACTSFACTS FACTSFACTS FACTSFACTS FACTSFACTS FACTSFACTS Lynn Erickson -- Concept-Based Curriculum and Instruction for the Thinking Classroom, 2007

40 Speaking In Generalizations Are you a history teacher or a historian? Are you a physics teacher or a physicist? Are you a geography teacher or a geographer. Historians, physicists, and geographers generalize about their concepts. Teacher must speak at the generalization level for concepts to soak in.

41 Generalizing: Social Studies Style ColonizationManifest Destiny New Nation Revolution Civil War Expansion--- Democracy --- Conflict --- Culture--- Industrialization As the country expanded and the population grew conflicts developed over cultural differences and the issue of States Rights.

42 Generalizing: Social Studies Style ColonizationManifest Destiny New Nation Revolution Civil War Expansion--- Democracy --- Conflict --- Culture--- Industrialization As the country expanded and the population grew conflicts developed over cultural differences and the issue of States Rights.

43 More Students Talking in Classrooms We have to get students talking about content and making connections themselves through intentional questioning. We must grade the student talk using rubrics!!! Students must see the talk paying off for them.

44 Speaking In Generalizations

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47 Comparison of Genres at Grade 6

48 Generalizing: Social Studies Style ColonizationManifest Destiny New Nation Revolution Civil War Expansion--- Democracy --- Conflict --- Culture--- Industrialization As the country expanded and the population grew conflicts developed over cultural differences and the issue of States Rights.

49 STAAR is an assessment of ACADEMIC READINESS

50 When They Say “Readiness” They Mean It

51

52 Did the 8 th Grade Historian Teach the Content Teach So Well They Can Use It Three Years Later

53 Generalize:____________

54 Teachers More interaction with the IFD to ensure specificity is being met. Relentless effort to talk in a more sophisticated way about the content. Formative assessment has to be done daily. “Work” must be assigned with the sole purpose of evaluating learning!!

55 Leaders Ensure teachers are sophisticated in their approach. Begin to integrate formative assessment structures to ensure a compulsory learning environment. Provide feedback on the level of complexity and difficulty to teachers daily.

56 Guaranteed and Viable Curriculum

57 57

58 What are the Vitals of a School?

59 Vitals of a School Level of Student Engagement Quality of Student Work Absenteeism by Students Maximizing Instructional Time with Strategic Instruction

60 STAAR Blueprints Creating a Compulsory Learning Environment

61 “The only way to discover the limits of the possible is to venture a little past them … into the impossible” - A.C. Clarke

62 Bibliography Dr. Ervin Knezek, SIRC Training 2011 –www.lead4ward.comwww.lead4ward.com Lynn Erickson -- Concept-Based Curriculum and Instruction for the Thinking Classroom, 2007 Instructional Leadership Development Training, Texas Education Agency, 2004


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