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Security Classification Practical Issues in dealing with different types of cybercrime.

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Presentation on theme: "Security Classification Practical Issues in dealing with different types of cybercrime."— Presentation transcript:

1 Security Classification Practical Issues in dealing with different types of cybercrime

2 Security Classification Overview Society Crime Types Resources E-Crime (Electronic Crime) Training Offences Jurisdiction Case studies

3 Security Classification Society

4 Security Classification Society Internet Usage 50% of Australian adults accessed the Internet in the 12 months to November % of Australian households were connected to the Internet 13% of Australian adults paid bills or transferred funds online 10% of Australian adults purchased or ordered goods or services via the Internet the value of Internet e-commerce in Australia at June 2000 was estimated to be $A5.1 billion

5 Security Classification Society 10% of Australian adults purchased or ordered goods or services via the Internet the value of Internet e-commerce in Australia at June 2000 was estimated to be $A5.1 billion National Office for the Information Economy report entitled. The Current State of Play 2000

6 Security Classification Crime Types

7 Security Classification Crime Types Crimes Reported to AFP %-Drug Importation cases 34% -Defraud the commonwealth cases 25%-Child Sex related cases 3%-Counterfeit currency/documents cases

8 Security Classification Crime Types Electronic Crime Incident Type 45% -E-Crime 11%-Interpol 2%-Counter terrorism 42%-Others (Fraud, Credit Card, Money Laundering)

9 Security Classification Crime types Breakdown of Computer Forensic Work 35% = Child Pornography 20% = Counter Terrorism 10% = Fraud (against the Commonwealth and private) (includes unauthorised access, hacking, unauthorised use of credit cards, make and use false instruments etc) 8% = Child Grooming (using the internet and mobile phones) 5% = Drug Offences 5% = Property Offences (possess stolen property, theft, burglary, armed robbery) 5% = Regional Assistance (referrals from IDG for Solomons, PNG, East Timor etc) 4% = Family Violence/Sexual Assaults etc 3% = Internal Investigations 2% = Homicides 3% = Other

10 Security Classification E-Crime Training

11 Security Classification E-Crime Training Continuing cybercrime education from recruit level E-Crime awareness training Introduction to E-Crime Investigate E-Crime Specialist Crime type training

12 Security Classification E-Crime Training Identify the offence Identify the suspect Identify witnesses Identify the victim

13 Security Classification Resources

14 Security Classification Resources Investigators access to resources AFP’s IT Infrastructure Access to computers Covert internet access

15 Security Classification Resources Development of specialist investigative tools eg. Boot cd’s / logicubes

16 Security Classification Resources Support investigative personnel in increasing their technical and investigative skills Development of specialised computer crime units Computer Forensic support

17 Security Classification Offences

18 Security Classification Offences Is the computer a target of the offence? Is the computer being used to facilitate the offence?

19 Security Classification Jurisdiction

20 Security Classification Jurisdiction The internet is transnational in nature Who has jurisdiction?

21 Security Classification Case Studies

22 Security Classification Case Study 1 Problem of Jurisdiction

23 Security Classification Case Study 1 Background Suspect initially resident in Australia then departed overseas. During his stay in Australia the suspect manages to transfer funds from a victims bank account via internet banking to his Australian bank account. The suspect continues with twenty similar offences targeting Australians from his new country.

24 Security Classification Case Study 2 Problem of identity theft

25 Security Classification Case Study 2 In 2003 a disgruntled ex Optus employee hacks into a Optus website called “efulfillment.” This website is used by corporate customers of Optus for ordering mobile phones and telecommunication services.

26 Security Classification Case Study 3 Problem of identification

27 Security Classification Case Study 3 On the 3rd December 2003 an , directed to David LOWE was received at the RTA Customer Service Centre. The sender wrote: "Unless all traffice infgringements for speeding incurred during the month of June are cancelled immediately, an explosive will be detonated in one of your major facilities. The cancellation of these infringement notices will be done quietly with no public notification. You have 48 hours. This threat is real".

28 Security Classification Questions?


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