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IT-320 Chapter 1 Introduction to Networks. Objectives 1. Differentiate between LANs, MANs, and WANs. 2. List and describe the components that make up.

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Presentation on theme: "IT-320 Chapter 1 Introduction to Networks. Objectives 1. Differentiate between LANs, MANs, and WANs. 2. List and describe the components that make up."— Presentation transcript:

1 IT-320 Chapter 1 Introduction to Networks

2 Objectives 1. Differentiate between LANs, MANs, and WANs. 2. List and describe the components that make up a network. 3. Given a network problem scenario, select an appropriate course of action based on a general troubleshooting strategy. 4. Describe the importance and use of documentation. 5. Identify the purpose, features, and functions of Hubs, Switches, Bridges, Routers, Gateways, and NICs. 6. Describe the OSI Model and how it relates to networks. 7. Recognize the different logical or physical network topologies given a diagram. 8. Specify the main features of the LLC and MAC Layers. 9. Given an example, identify a MAC address. 10. Identify the seven layers of the OSI model. 11. Identify which layers of the OSI model different network devices operate. 12. Explain the need for network standardization. 13. Define a Virtual Circuit. 14. Define sessions, explaining how they relate to networks. 15. List and define the 802 Project Standards. 16. Define signaling, modulation, and encoding. 17. Define bandwidth and compare broadband with baseband. 18. List and describe the different connection services.

3 FIGURE 1-1 Computers Networked Together Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

4 FIGURE 1-2 with Microsoft Outlook Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

5 FIGURE 1-3 A Network Card with an Unshielded Twisted-Pair (UTP) Cable Attached to a RJ-45 Connector and an Unused BNC Connector Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

6 FIGURE 1-4 A WAN Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

7 FIGURE 1-5 The Internet Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

8 FIGURE 1-6 Cisco Troubleshooting Model Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

9 IT-320Chapter 2 Introduction to the OSI Model

10 FIGURE 2-1 The OSI Reference Model Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

11 FIGURE 2-2 Layer Interaction of the OSI Reference Model Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

12 FIGURE 2-3 Encapsulation that Actually Occurs on Today’s Networks Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

13 FIGURE 2-4 Information Blocks Associated with the Simplified OSI Model Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

14 FIGURE 2-5 A network Request Going Through the Simplified OSI Model Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

15 FIGURE 2-6 Point-to-Point and Multipoint Connections Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

16 FIGURE 2-7 Two Examples of Bus Topologies Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

17 FIGURE 2-8 Two Examples of Ring Topologies Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

18 FIGURE 2-9 Star Topology Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

19 FIGURE 2-10 Mesh Topology and Modified Mesh Topology Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

20 FIGURE 2-11 Cellular Topology Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

21 FIGURE 2-12 Hybrid Topologies (Bus Star and Star Ring) Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

22 FIGURE 2-13 Twisted Pair Cable Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

23 FIGURE 2-14 UTP Cable Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

24 FIGURE 2-15 UTP Cable with a RJ-45 Connector and a UTP Cable with a RJ-11 Connector Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

25 FIGURE 2-16 Shielded Twisted Pair Cable Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

26 FIGURE 2-17 IBM Shielded Twisted Pair Cable Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

27 FIGURE 2-18 Coaxial Cable Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

28 FIGURE 2-19 A Network Card Attached to a Coaxial Cable and a Terminator Using a T-Connector. Because this is the End of the Bus, it Requires a Terminator Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

29 FIGURE 2-20 Fiber Optic Cable and Common Connectors (ST, SC, and MT-RJ) Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

30 FIGURE 2-21 Three Networks Connected Together with a Router. Each Computer is Identified by its Eight Hexadecimal Digit MAC Address. Notice the MAC Address A is Used Repeatedly but on Different Networks Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

31 FIGURE 2-22 Two Examples of a Logical Bus Topology Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

32 FIGURE 2-23 Logical Ring Topology Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

33 FIGURE 2-24 The 802 Standards Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

34 FIGURE 2-25 Simplex, Half Duplex, and Full Duplex Communications Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

35 FIGURE 2-26 A Repeater Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

36 FIGURE 2-27 A Hub Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

37 FIGURE 2-28 A Bridge Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.

38 FIGURE 2-29 A Router Patrick Regan Wide Area Networks Copyright ©2004 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey All rights reserved.


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