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AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd 2006 1 C2 1.1 True or false? How to play: Put your hand up for true, leave your hand down for false. Keep track of your.

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Presentation on theme: "AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd 2006 1 C2 1.1 True or false? How to play: Put your hand up for true, leave your hand down for false. Keep track of your."— Presentation transcript:

1 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd C2 1.1 True or false? How to play: Put your hand up for true, leave your hand down for false. Keep track of your score.

2 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd C2 1.1 The middle of an atom is called the nucleus. TRUE

3 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd C2 1.1 In an atom, the protons and electrons are in the nucleus. FALSE – only neutrons and protons are in the nucleus.

4 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd C2 1.1 The atomic number gives the number of protons in an atom. TRUE

5 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd C2 1.1 The number of protons in an atom is equal to the number of electrons in that atom. TRUE

6 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd C2 1.1 The elements in the periodic table are arranged in order of atomic number. TRUE

7 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd C2 1.1 The maximum number of electrons in the first shell is 8. FALSE – it is 2.

8 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd C2 1.1 The atomic number is also called the neutron number. FALSE – it is called the proton number.

9 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd C2 1.1 The charge on an electron is zero. FALSE – an electron has a charge of –1.

10 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd C2 1.1 What is your score out of 8 …? Try to beat your score next time or get 100% again!

11 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd C2 1.1 Ionic bonding game

12 C2 1.1 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd What is the correct way to show a sodium ion? Na + Na –

13 C2 1.1 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd What charge would be on a hydrogen ion? +1 –1

14 C2 1.1 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd Melting points of ionic compounds are…? low high

15 C2 1.1 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd Carbon dioxide has an ionic bond. True False

16 C2 1.1 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd Metals always make positive ions. True False

17 C2 1.1 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd Atomic Scientists C2 1.7 How have our ideas about atoms changed over the years?

18 C2 1.1 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd My name is Democritus and I am the father of the atomic theory! I was born in 460 BC, and put forward the idea of atoms. Even the word ‘atom’ comes from a Greek word meaning ‘cannot be cut’. I suggested that atoms were the smallest possible particles and that everything in the world was made from them stuck together in different patterns.

19 C2 1.1 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd My name is John Dalton and I was the first modern man to take atoms seriously. I was born in I suggested that atoms are small, cannot be broken apart and join together to make everything around us. We know that water contains hydrogen and oxygen so I suggested that one atom of hydrogen linked with one of oxygen to make a new compound – water! Democritus? Never heard of him!

20 C2 1.1 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd My name is J. J. Thompson but my friends call me JJ. I was born in 1856 and spent a lot of time working in the famous Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge. I put forward the ‘plum pudding’ model of the atom based on work I did with cathode ray tubes (the thing you used to use for televisions). I suggested an atom consists of a tiny sphere with even smaller, negatively charged particles called electrons embedded in it … like fruit in a Christmas pudding! Pity Dalton didn’t know about electrons.

21 C2 1.1 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd My name is Ernest Rutherford. I was born in 1871 in New Zealand. I actually worked with ‘JJ’ and built on his plum pudding model to show that most of the atom was empty. Most of the mass was held in a tiny central nucleus with electrons flying around it like planets around the Sun. When JJ retired I took over his job at the Cavendish.

22 C2 1.1 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd My name is Neils Bohr and I was born in 1885 in Copenhagen. I worked with Rutherford and JJ Thompson and in 1913 I published a paper that showed how electrons flying around the atom fitted into shells – they didn’t just move randomly! I worked hard all of my life on atomic physics and only just escaped from Germany when the Nazis came to power. I ended up for a while in America where I worked on the atomic bomb project. After the war I spent a lot of time campaigning for peaceful uses of nuclear technology – including writing to the United Nations.

23 C2 1.1 AQA Science © Nelson Thornes Ltd My name is James Chadwick and I was born in 1885 in Cheshire. And yes, I also worked with Rutherford! My discovery was the neutron. It’s a tiny particle in the nucleus with a mass of one unit but no charge at all. It explains how different atoms of the same element can have different weights. It was an essential part of the theory that has led to the modern understanding of atoms.


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