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How was it developed? Collaboration and community is a central tenet of the work. Conscious effort to bring stakeholders who have not talked in the same.

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Presentation on theme: "How was it developed? Collaboration and community is a central tenet of the work. Conscious effort to bring stakeholders who have not talked in the same."— Presentation transcript:

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2 How was it developed? Collaboration and community is a central tenet of the work. Conscious effort to bring stakeholders who have not talked in the same room, for an extended period of time. Background Information

3 In January 2010, National Council for the Social Studies and the Campaign for the Civic Mission of Schools convened 15 national organizations in civics, economics, and history, to have a conversation about common state standards for social studies.

4 American Association of Geographers American Bar Association American Historical Association Center for Civic Education Campaign for the Civic Mission of Schools Constitutional Rights Foundation/USA Constitutional Rights Foundation/Chicago Council for Economic Education National Council for Geographic Education National Council for History Education National Council for the Social Studies National Geographic Society National History Day Street Law, Inc. World History Association

5 The social studies is an interdisciplinary exploration of the social sciences and humanities, including civics, history, economics, and geography, in order to develop responsible, informed, and engaged citizens and to foster civic, global, historical, geographic, and economic literacy.

6 Social Studies Assessment, Curriculum and Instruction (SSACI) Collaborative at CCSSO – 23 States and Two Affiliate Members: – Los Angeles County Office of Education – University of Delaware State-level expertise and guidance in social studies

7 How was it developed? American Association of Geographers American Bar Association American Historical Association Center for Civic Education Campaign for the Civic Mission of Schools Constitutional Rights Foundation/USA Constitutional Rights Foundation/Chicago Council for Economic Education National Council for Geographic Education National Council for History Education National Council for the Social Studies National Geographic Society National History Day Street Law, Inc. World History Association

8 How was it developed? Keith C. Barton, Indiana University Stephen Buckles, Vanderbilt University Flannery Burke, Saint Louis University Jim Charkins, California State University S.G. Grant, Binghamton University Susan W. Hardwick, University of Oregon John Lee, North Carolina State University Peter Levine, Tufts University Meira Levinson, Harvard University Anand Marri, Columbia University Chauncey Monte-Sano, University of Michigan Robert Morrill, Virginia Polytechnic Kathy Swan, University of Kentucky Karen Thomas-Brown, University of Michigan- Dearborn Cynthia Tyson, The Ohio State University Bruce VanSledright, University of Maryland Merry Wiesner-Hanks University of Wisconsin- Milwaukee

9 How was it developed? Lisa Lacefield, Arkansas John White, Arkansas Charlee Passig Archuleta, Colorado Anton Schulzki, Colorado Wendy Harrington, Delaware Sally J. Meyer, Georgia William S. Rakosnik, Georgia Pamela M.T. (Takehiro) King, Hawaii Carrie Sato, Hawaii Mitzie Higa, Hawaii Rob Dittmer, Iowa Nancy Peterson, Iowa Beth Levinsky, Illinois Jeffrey W. Lightfoot, Illinois Michael Hutchison, Indiana Callie Marksbary, Indiana Amanda Jessee, Kansas James K. Robb, Kansas Barry Leonard, Kentucky Thad Elmore, Kentucky Rebecca K. Valbuena, California Michael A. Long, California Kimberly Loisel, Maryland Dr. Donna Phillips, Maryland Shane Gower, Maine Barbara Perry, Maine David Johnson, Michigan Raymond Walker, Michigan Debra Williams, Missouri Roxanna Mechem, Missouri Mary G. Stevens, North Carolina Traci Barger, North Carolina Lonnie Moore, Nebraska Mary Lynn Reiser, Nebraska Tim Dove, Ohio Gloria Wu, Ohio Laura Finney, Ohio Pam Merrill, Oklahoma Tara Gray, Washington Sabrina Shaw, Washington Lauren Mittermann, Wisconsin Tina Flood, Wisconsin

10 How was it developed? American Heritage Bill of Rights Institute C-Span Center for Economic Education and Entrepreneurship, U of Delaware Citizen Me Colonial Williamsburg Council of Economic Education DBQ Project Junior Achievement Federal Judicial Center-History Office Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, Economic Education Freedom Forum First Amendment Center Heritage Education Services—National Park Services Library of Congress Mikva Challenge, Chicago National Archives National Constitution Center Newseum Smithsonian Institution Smithsonian American Art Museum Smithsonian American Indian Museum Teaching for Change What So Proudly We Hail

11 Social Studies Assessment, Curriculum and Instruction Collaborative 23 States/Affiliates 15 Professional Organizations 17 Writers 50 Teachers 10 Editors 4 Graphic Designers 27 Curricular and Cultural Organizations Over 3000 respondents

12 What is the C3 Framework? Prepares the nation’s young people for college, careers, and civic life; Inquiry is its foundation; Formed by core * disciplines of civics, economics, geography, and history; Composed of deep and enduring understandings, concepts, and skills from the disciplines. Emphasizes skills and practices as preparation for democratic decision- making. Shares in the responsibilities for literacy instruction in K-12 education. *Appendices for Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology (9-12)

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14  Dimension 1 Developing Questions and Planning Inquiries  Dimension 2 Applying Disciplinary Tools and Concepts (Civics, Economics, Geography, and History)  Dimension 3 Evaluating Sources and Using Evidence  Dimension 4 Communicating Conclusions and Taking Informed Action

15 Compelling questions focus on real social problems, issues, and curiosities about how the world works Intellectually meaty Kid friendly Examples: Was the American Revolution revolutionary? Was the Civil Rights movement of the 1960’s a success? Why do we need rules?

16 Supporting questions scaffold students’ investigations into the ideas and issues behind a compelling question. Examples: What were the regulations imposed on the colonists under the Townshend Acts? What legislation was enacted as a result of the Civil Rights Movement? What are some rules that families follow?

17 Literacies derived from the Common Core State Standards in English language Arts/Literacy form an essential thread required by the actual demands of college, work, and civic life.

18 Active and responsible citizens are able to identify and analyze public problems, deliberate with other people about how to define and address issues, take constructive action together, reflect on their actions, create and sustain groups, and influence institutions both large and small. They vote, serve on juries when called, follow the news and current events, and participate in voluntary groups and efforts. Teaching students to be able to act in these ways—as citizens—significantly enhances preparation for college and career.

19 C3 Framework Bulletin will have text of C3 Framework with introductory and explanatory articles. Special Issue of Social Education, November/December, edited by Michelle Herczog, NCSS President-Elect C3 Strand at the NCSS Annual Conference in St. Louis, November 22-24, 2013 NCSS Bulletin - C3 Practice Examples from Curricular Partners

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