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C3 Framework for Social Studies Standards Adapted from Swan, Griffin, Lee & Grant, 2013 © Preview Questions: If there were no barriers (time, access to.

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Presentation on theme: "C3 Framework for Social Studies Standards Adapted from Swan, Griffin, Lee & Grant, 2013 © Preview Questions: If there were no barriers (time, access to."— Presentation transcript:

1 C3 Framework for Social Studies Standards Adapted from Swan, Griffin, Lee & Grant, 2013 © Preview Questions: If there were no barriers (time, access to resources, etc.), what would high quality learning in social studies look like? Your legislator asks you to define in 3-4 bullet points why social studies education is essential. What do you tell her?

2 College, Career and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards: State guidance for enhancing the rigor of K-12 civics, economics, geography and history What is the C3 Framework? Adapted from Swan, Griffin, Lee & Grant, 2013 ©

3 What is the C3 Framework? Adapted from Swan, Griffin, Lee & Grant, 2013 © The C3 Framework’s objectives are to enhance the rigor of the social studies disciplines; build the critical thinking, problem solving, and participatory skills necessary for students to become engaged citizens; and align academic programs in social studies to the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies. Michelle Herczog, NCSS President-Elect, 2013

4 Origins and Development PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES of the C3 Framework Why a framework and not a set of standards? - standards now viewed as top-down (state’s rights?) - framework is flexible for states and districts - NCSS Standards elaborate on content and can be used with C3 Framework What audiences are served by the C3 Framework? - states- guide to upgrading their standards - practitioners- to improve their local programs What are the objectives of the C3 Framework? 1) enhance rigor 2) build critical thinking. problem-solving, and participatory skills 3) align academic programs in social studies to the Common Core State Standards in ELA and Literacy in History/Social Studies 2010 – 2011 : NCSS and the Campaign for the Civic Mission of Schools convened a meeting with 15 organizations to begin a conversation : C3 Framework writing, revision and publication

5 Origins and Development Relationship to Common Core Standards The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) copyrighted the term “Common Core” and has reserved it for the Common Core standards in Mathematics and Language Arts. The CCSSO collaborative – Social Studies Assessment Curriculum and Instruction (SSACI)- initiated a conversation that led to the C3 Framework task force…but… CCSSO decided it would not pursue or support national social studies standards, feeling it would distract from Common Core

6 Are Common Core and PARCC Assessments political ??? [Ohio SBOE Member] Smith said: “My question is if the PARCC assessments are tied to a Socialist, Communist agenda. This will not facilitate this American culture that we live in. There is a growing number of people that have concerns about the agenda that is being promoted. When the door is opened, we do have to guard the democracy and the very core of this agenda because it is against the very principles that we were founded upon.” September 2013 Swan, Griffin, Lee & Grant, 2013 ©

7 Relationship to Common Core r COMMON CORE Other national Initiatives

8 How was it developed? Adapted from Swan, Griffin, Lee & Grant, 2013 © Task Force - key national organizations related to social studies SSACI – collaborative of 25 states and institutions Writing Team Other Critical Voices Teacher Collaborative Council C3 Development – collaboration and broad input were essential

9 Task Force and SSACI Collaborative Task Force American Association of Geographers American Bar Association American Historical Association Center for Civic Education Campaign for the Civic Mission of Schools Constitutional Rights Foundation/USA Constitutional Rights Foundation/Chicago Council for Economic Education National Council for Geographic Education National Council for History Education National Council for the Social Studies National Geographic Society National History Day Street Law, Inc. World History Association Arizona Arkansas Colorado District of Columbia Georgia Hawaii Iowa Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maine Maryland Michigan Missouri Montana Nebraska North Carolina Ohio (Bill Muthig) Utah Washington Wisconsin Wyoming Los Angeles County University of Delaware SSACI Collaborative

10 Writing Team Keith C. Barton, Indiana University Stephen Buckles, Vanderbilt University Flannery Burke, Saint Louis University Jim Charkins, California State University S.G. Grant, Binghamton University Susan W. Hardwick, University of Oregon John Lee, North Carolina State University Peter Levine, Tufts University Meira Levinson, Harvard University Anand Marri, Columbia University Chauncey Monte-Sano, University of Michigan Robert Morrill, Virginia Polytechnic Kathy Swan, University of Kentucky Karen Thomas-Brown, University of Michigan-Dearborn Cynthia Tyson, The Ohio State University Bruce VanSledright, University of Maryland Merry Wiesner-Hanks University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

11 Teacher Collaborative Council Lisa Lacefield, Arkansas John White, Arkansas Charlee Passig Archuleta, Colorado Anton Schulzki, Colorado Wendy Harrington, Delaware Sally J. Meyer, Georgia William S. Rakosnik, Georgia Pamela M.T. (Takehiro) King, Hawaii Carrie Sato, Hawaii Mitzie Higa, Hawaii Rob Dittmer, Iowa Nancy Peterson, Iowa Beth Levinsky, Illinois Jeffrey W. Lightfoot, Illinois Michael Hutchison, Indiana Callie Marksbary, Indiana Amanda Jessee, Kansas James K. Robb, Kansas Barry Leonard, Kentucky Thad Elmore, Kentucky Rebecca K. Valbuena, California Michael A. Long, California Kimberly Loisel, Maryland Dr. Donna Phillips, Maryland Shane Gower, Maine Barbara Perry, Maine David Johnson, Michigan Raymond Walker, Michigan Debra Williams, Missouri Roxanna Mechem, Missouri Mary G. Stevens, North Carolina Traci Barger, North Carolina Lonnie Moore, Nebraska Mary Lynn Reiser, Nebraska Tim Dove, Ohio Tim Dove, Ohio Gloria Wu, Ohio Gloria Wu, Ohio Laura Finney, Ohio Laura Finney, Ohio Pam Merrill, Oklahoma Tara Gray, Washington Sabrina Shaw, Washington Lauren Mittermann, Wisconsin Tina Flood, Wisconsin

12 Critical Voices American Heritage Bill of Rights Institute C-Span Center for Economic Education and Entrepreneurship, U of Delaware Citizen Me Colonial Williamsburg Council of Economic Education DBQ Project Junior Achievement Federal Judicial Center-History Office Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, Economic Education Freedom Forum First Amendment Center Heritage Education Services—National Park Services Library of Congress Mikva Challenge, Chicago National Archives National Constitution Center Newseum Smithsonian Institution Smithsonian American Art Museum Smithsonian American Indian Museum Teaching for Change What So Proudly We Hail

13 Next Steps Over 3000 respondents from the social studies community provided targeted feedback on the C3 Framework during the month of April. * OCSS Executive Board and the Ohio S.S. Supervisors Network both provided feedback These stakeholders represented K-12 educators, university faculty, state education personnel, professional organization representatives, educational publishers, and cultural organizations. The respondents offered an overwhelmingly positive reaction to the content, structure, and format of the document. NCSS recently published the document. (CCSSO also published a version) Get it online at: When will the C3 Framework be published? Adapted from Swan, Griffin, Lee & Grant, 2013 ©

14 Inquiry Arc of the C3 Framework What is the C3 Framework? Adapted from Swan, Griffin, Lee & Grant, 2013 ©

15 What is the C3 Framework? 1.Preparation for college, careers, and civic life; 2.Inquiry is its foundation; 3.core* disciplines of civics, economics, geography, and history; * the appendix includes Psychology, Sociology, and Anthropology 4.deep and enduring understandings, concepts, and skills 5.skills and practices as preparation for democratic decision-making. 6.Shares responsibilities for literacy instruction in K-12 education. Foundations of Social Studies Adapted from Swan, Griffin, Lee & Grant, 2013 ©

16 Dimension 1: Developing Questions and Planning Inquiries Dimension 2: Applying Disciplinary Tools and Concepts (Civics, Economics, Geography, and History) Dimension 3: Evaluating Sources and Using Evidence Dimension 4: Communicating Conclusions and Taking Informed Action What is the C3 Framework? Adapted from Swan, Griffin, Lee & Grant, 2013 ©

17 Dimension 1: Developing Questions and Planning Inquiries Dimension 2: Applying Disciplinary Tools and Concepts (Civics, Economics, Geography, and History) Dimension 3: Evaluating Sources and Using Evidence Dimension 4: Communicating Conclusions and Taking Informed Action What is the C3 Framework? Adapted from Swan, Griffin, Lee & Grant, 2013 ©

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23 Swan, Griffin, Lee & Grant, 2013 © What is the C3 Framework?

24 We do that! Teacher- generated Student- generated Think of a project or activity you use which you would consider to be a good inquiry-based activity. Who generates the compelling or essential question and the supporting questions that guide the work? Who identifies the potential sources of information, narrows or expands them, and identifies the most effective path for research and workflow? Who determines the criteria for evaluating the evidence? Who identifies the best medium or media to communicate the findings?

25 Dimension 1 Questioning is key to student learning. The C3 Framework encourages the use of compelling and supporting questions, both teacher- and student- generated, as a central element of the teaching and learning process. C3 Framework, 2013 The Four Dimensions highlighted in the table, center on the use of questions to spark curiosity, guide instruction, deepen investigations, acquire rigorous content, and apply knowledge and ideas in real world settings to enable students to become active and engaged citizens in the twenty-first century. Social Education, Sept., 2103 Compelling Questions - Compelling questions focus on enduring issues and concerns….and unresolved issues that require students to construct arguments in response. “Was the American Revolution revolutionary?” Supporting Questions - focus on descriptions, definitions, and processes and require students to construct explanations that advance claims of understanding in response. “What were the regulations imposed on the colonists under the Townshend Acts?”

26 Dimension 2—Applying Disciplinary Tools and Concepts Adapted from Swan, Griffin, Lee & Grant, 2013 © Dimension 2- Disciplines

27 Geography K-12 Pathway Adapted from Swan, Griffin, Lee & Grant, 2013 © Geographic Representations: Spatial Views of the World Dimension 2- Disciplines

28 Geography K-12 Pathway Adapted from Swan, Griffin, Lee & Grant, 2013 © Dimension 2- Disciplines Human-Environment Interaction: Place, Regions, and Culture

29 What is the C3 Framework? Civic Engagement Adapted from Swan, Griffin, Lee & Grant, 2013 © Now more than ever, students need the intellectual power to recognize societal problems, ask good questions and develop robust investigations into them, consider possible solutions and consequences, separate evidence-based claims from parochial opinions, and communicate and act upon what they learn. C3 Framework, 2013 Now more than ever, students need the intellectual power to recognize societal problems, ask good questions and develop robust investigations into them, consider possible solutions and consequences, separate evidence-based claims from parochial opinions, and communicate and act upon what they learn. C3 Framework, 2013 Dimension 2- Disciplines

30 What is the C3 Framework? Civic Engagement Adapted from Swan, Griffin, Lee & Grant, 2013 © Dimension 2- Disciplines

31 What is the C3 Framework? Dimension 3 - Evaluating Sources and Using Evidence Gathering and Evaluating Sources Developing Claims and Using Evidence

32 What is the C3 Framework? Dimension 3 - Evaluating Sources and Using Evidence Each dimension has direct connections with the ELA/Literacy standards

33 What is the C3 Framework? Common Core ELA The C3 Framework fully incorporates and extends the expectations for literacy learning put forward in the ELA Common Core. We view the literacy skills detailed in the ELA Common Core as establishing a foundation for inquiry in social studies. These literacy skills are an indispensable part of social studies. Adapted from Swan, Griffin, Lee & Grant, 2013 ©

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35 What is the C3 Framework? Dimension 4 - Communicating Conclusions and Taking Informed Action Most inquiries will culminate in a range of activities and assessments that support the goals of college and career readiness. They should also support the third feature of the C3 Framework: readiness for civic life. C3 Framework, 2013

36 What is the C3 Framework? Dimension 4 - Communicating Conclusions and Taking Informed Action

37 What is the C3 Framework? Dimension 4 - Communicating Conclusions and Taking Informed Action

38 Next Steps How will the C3 Framework be used? States indicated they would make good use of the Framework: – For standards creation; – As a companion to existing standards; – To guide professional development and development of curricular resources; – To explain to policy makers: “What is social studies and how does it contribute to the 3 C’s?” – Other? Adapted from Swan, Griffin, Lee & Grant, 2013 ©

39 C3 Framework for Social Studies Standards Adapted from Swan, Griffin, Lee & Grant, 2013 © Presented by Dan Langen


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