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The Model Lighting Ordinance James R. Benya, PE, FIES, IALD, LC BENYA LIGHTING DESIGN And The Benya Burnett Consultancy.

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Presentation on theme: "The Model Lighting Ordinance James R. Benya, PE, FIES, IALD, LC BENYA LIGHTING DESIGN And The Benya Burnett Consultancy."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Model Lighting Ordinance James R. Benya, PE, FIES, IALD, LC BENYA LIGHTING DESIGN And The Benya Burnett Consultancy

2 History 2005 Joint IDA/IES Task Force Formed 2006 First drafts circulated, lighting zones determined 2007 BUG invented, changes to TM15 proposed 2008 Changes to TM15, attempted reconciliation with LRC’s OSP 2009 First Public Review 2010 Second Public Review 2011 Final Draft Approved by IDA and IES; work on performance method continues

3 Basic Concepts Limit the total light in the environment to actual need by lighting zone Prevent direct upward light radiation Restrict light trespass onto adjacent properties Reduce glare

4 LIGHTING ZONES

5 Lighting Zones First used in California and Arizona to isolate observatories from sky glow of cities Current international method developed by CIE and introduced in IES RP Criteria in US –Impact on local environment –Ambient light level of local environment –Adaptation of the viewer –Expectation of light –Ability to make lighting operation dynamic

6 Lighting Zones LZ0: No ambient lighting Areas where the natural environment will be seriously and adversely affected by lighting. Impacts include disturbing the biological cycles of flora and fauna and/or detracting from human enjoyment and appreciation of the natural environment. Human activity is subordinate in importance to nature. The vision of human residents and users is adapted to the darkness, and they expect to see little or no lighting. When not needed, lighting should be extinguished.

7 Lighting Zones LZ1: Low ambient lighting Areas where lighting might adversely affect flora and fauna or disturb the character of the area. The vision of human residents and users is adapted to low light levels. Lighting may be used for safety and convenience but it is not necessarily uniform or continuous. After curfew, most lighting should be extinguished or reduced as activity levels decline.

8 Lighting Zones LZ2: Moderate ambient lighting Areas of human activity where the vision of human residents and users is adapted to moderate light levels. Lighting may typically be used for safety and convenience but it is not necessarily uniform or continuous. After curfew, lighting may be extinguished or reduced as activity levels decline.

9 Lighting Zones LZ3: Moderately high ambient lighting Areas of human activity where the vision of human residents and users is adapted to moderately high light levels. Lighting is generally desired for safety, security and/or convenience and it is often uniform and/or continuous. After curfew, lighting may be extinguished or reduced in most areas as activity levels decline.

10 Lighting Zones LZ4: High ambient lighting Areas of human activity where the vision of human residents and users is adapted to high light levels. Lighting is generally considered necessary for safety, security and/or convenience and it is mostly uniform and/or continuous. After curfew, lighting may be extinguished or reduced in some areas as activity levels decline.

11 “Bug” lights?!?

12 BUG Rating System B acklight U plight G lare

13 BUG Changes Upcoming Before Uplight rating included lower hemisphere VH values After Uplight rating includes only uplight

14 Example BUG Rating

15 BUG Thinking 100 w MH Type III FCO B2 U0 G2 175 w MH Type III FCO B3 U0 G3

16 BUG Thinking 100 w MH Type III FCO B2 U0 G2 100 w MH Type III FCO Houseside Shield B1 U0 G1

17 BUG Thinking Don’t use luminaires with uplight To get lower ratings use smaller lumen packages To get better B ratings, consider house side shields Maximum source package for G4~40,000 lumens High lumen packages only for special applications such as retail or sports lighting

18 Decorative BUG Fully shielded bell, 150 watt HPS, B3 U0 G3 Drop teardrop refractor 110 w LED, B3 U3 G3

19 MLO STRUCTURE

20 Preamble The purpose of this Ordinance is to provide regulations for outdoor lighting that will: a. Permit the use of outdoor lighting that does not exceed the minimum levels specified in IES recommended practices for night-time safety, utility, security, productivity, enjoyment, and commerce.

21 Preamble The purpose of this Ordinance is to provide regulations for outdoor lighting that will: b. Minimize adverse offsite impacts of lighting such as light trespass, and obtrusive light.

22 Preamble The purpose of this Ordinance is to provide regulations for outdoor lighting that will: c. Curtail light pollution, reduce skyglow and improve the nighttime environment for astronomy.

23 Preamble The purpose of this Ordinance is to provide regulations for outdoor lighting that will: d. Help protect the natural environment from the adverse effects of night lighting from gas or electric sources.

24 Preamble The purpose of this Ordinance is to provide regulations for outdoor lighting that will: e. Conserve energy and resources to the greatest extent possible.

25 General Requirements Applicability –All outdoor lighting except roadway –Optional streetlighting section Exemptions –Signs –Monuments, flag –Repairs –Underwater lighting - Temporary Lighting -Emergency lighting -Low volt landscape lighting (LZ2-4)

26 General Requirements Applicability –Special plans and government regulations take precedence Controls –Automatic on/off –Reduced lighting after curfew

27 Non-Residential Lighting Limits Prescriptive Method Lumens per unit area allowance based on need and LZ Absolute photometry Includes general lighting lumens and specific use “use it or lose it” lumens Designed to match ASHRAE/IES 90.1 and may be interchangeable Performance Method Off site impact is evaluated Maximum off site impacts by LZ Takes reflected light into account Very similar to LRC’s OSP method Designed to be computed using standard radiosity software

28 Residential Lighting Lumen limits per luminaire per lighting zone All exterior lighting shielded except for one luminaire per domicile Limits to floodlighting and landscape lighting include lumens and aiming

29 Special Situations and Permits High intensity lighting –Aerial lasers –Searchlights Complex and Non-conforming Uses –Special activity and high light level uses –Special permitting process laid out

30 Special permits for 1. Sports facilities, including but not limited to unconditioned rinks, open courts, fields, and stadiums. 2. Construction lighting. 3. Lighting for industrial sites having special requirements, such as petrochemical manufacturing or storage, shipping piers, etc. 4. Parking structures. 5. Urban parks 6. Ornamental and architectural lighting of bridges, public monuments, statuary and public buildings. 7. Theme and amusement parks. 8. Correctional facilities.

31 Existing Lighting Amortization New uses and structures Abandonment and change of use Additions and/or alterations

32 MLO STATUS

33 Status Approved by IDA and IES Boards Ready for review and beginning the adoption process Final adjustments being made to BUG system and several related requirements to be approved by IDA and IES Boards Suggested for International use to EU and Great Britain

34 Status Included in part in the following codes and standards (site lumen allowance dropped in favor of outdoor lighting power allowance) for LEED 2012 CalGreen ASHRAE/IES 189.1

35 The Model Lighting Ordinance


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